Documentaries and art movies have been filtered out. These are movies that have fewer than 5,000 votes by audience members, but at least 25 votes from critics. These movies are then filtered so that only the ones that have at least 85 percent of critics enjoying the movie are shown.

Leave No Trace (2018) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

Leave No Trace takes an effectively low-key approach to a potentially sensationalistic story -- and further benefits from brilliant work by Ben Foster and Thomasin McKenzie.



The Tale (2018) 

98% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

The Tale handles its extraordinarily challenging subject matter with sensitivity, grace, and the power of some standout performances led by a remarkable Laura Dern.



The Sisters Brothers (2018) 

84% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

The Sisters Brothers rides familiar genre trails in occasionally unexpected ways - a satisfying journey further elevated by its well-matched leading men.



The Miseducation of Cameron Post (2018) 

86% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

The Miseducation of Cameron Post tells its timely coming-of-age story with wit, compassion, and an affecting overall generosity of spirit.



Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far on Foot (2018) 

75% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far on Foot avoids inspirational biopic clichés thanks to sensitive work from writer-director Gus Van Sant and the admirable efforts of a well-chosen cast.



The Wild Pear Tree (2018) 

87% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

A boundless place of exile where all hopes and dreams merge with despair like the coinciding destinies of fathers and sons



Bad Times at the El Royale (2018) 

72% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Smart, stylish, and packed with solid performances, Bad Times at the El Royale delivers pure popcorn fun with the salty tang of social subtext.



Dogman (2018) 

72% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Dogman offers a grim character study set apart by Marcello Fonte's performance and director Matteo Garrone's tight grip on the material.



Blindspotting (2018) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

As timely as it is overall impactful, Blindspotting blends buddy comedy with seething social commentary, and rises on the strength of Daveed Diggs' powerful performance.



Thunder Road (2018) 

95% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

Written and directed by Jim Cummings, who also stars alongside Nican Robinson, Jocelyn DeBoer, Macon Blair, Bill Wise, Jordan Fox, and Chelsea Edmundson.



The Wife (2017) 

84% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

The Wife relies on the strength of Glenn Close's performance to drive home the power of its story -- and she proves thoroughly, grippingly up to the task.



First They Killed My Father (2017) 

88% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

First They Killed My Father tackles its subject matter with grace, skill, and empathy, offering a ground-level look at historic atrocities that resonates beyond its story's borders.



A Bag of Marbles (2017) 

85% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

Patrick Bruel resonates as the Jewish family patriarch Roman, while newcomers Dorian Le Clech and Batyste Fleurial register an almost agonizing vulnerability as hapless innocents trying to outrun the barbarous machinery of war.



Lean on Pete (2017) 

92% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

Lean on Pete avoids mawkish melodrama, offering an empathetic yet clear-eyed portrayal of a young man at a crossroads that confirms Charley Plummer as a major talent.



Columbus (2017) 

98% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

Wonderfully acted and artfully composed, Columbus balances the clean lines of architecture against the messiness of love, with tenderly moving results.



The Silent Child (2017) 

91% of critics love it, but only 700 people have rated it.

When fresh faced social worker, Joanne turns up we see Libby transform.



The Rider (2017) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

The Rider's hard-hitting drama is only made more effective through writer-director Chloé Zhao's use of untrained actors to tell the movie's fact-based tale.



A Taxi Driver (2017) 

95% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

A Taxi Driver brings a ground-level perspective and a refreshingly light touch to a fact-based story with sobering implications.



Foxtrot (2017) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Foxtrot uses topical themes to deliver a bruising sociopolitical statement that's equally effective taken simply as an absorbing, well-acted drama.



Negative Space (2017) 

100% of critics love it, but only 600 people have rated it.

Always leaving on business trips, the father connects with Sam by teaching him how to pack a suitcase efficiently.



What Will People Say (2017) 

78% of critics love it, but only 700 people have rated it.

What Will People Say? argues that institutional sexism starts at home -- and the results can be as powerful as they are difficult to watch.



Ethel & Ernest (2016) 

96% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Gentle, poignant, and vividly animated, Ethel & Ernest is a warm character study with an evocative sense of time and place.



Big Fish & Begonia (2016) 

90% of critics love it, but only 1,100 people have rated it.

Big Fish & Begonia's richly rendered blend of animation styles perfectly complements its bighearted, surprisingly complex cautionary fish tale.



The Young Offenders (2016) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Jock is a legendary bike thief who plays a daily game of cat-and-mouse with the bike-theft-obsessed Garda Sergeant Healy.



Divines (2016) 

82% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

In a ghetto near Paris where drugs and religion reign supreme, Dounia is hungry for her share of power and success.



The Age of Shadows (2016) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

The Age of Shadows justifies its imposing length with a richly detailed period drama whose sprawling size is matched by strong acting, impressive craft, and narrative depth.



Sami Blood (2016) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

She must soon choose between new academic opportunities or staying true to her cultural identity, all while weathering the storms of adolescence.



Glory (2016) 

93% of critics love it, but only 700 people have rated it.

Tsanko Petrov, a railroad worker, finds millions of leva on the train tracks.



In Between (2016) 

98% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

In Between takes a light yet nuanced approach to dramatizing complex, timely themes, further enriched by outstanding cinematography and powerful performances.



Parched (2015) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

Parched world premiered at the 2015 Toronto International Film Festival.



April and the Extraordinary World (2015) 

96% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Bursting with a colorful imagination befitting its promise-packed title, April and the Extraordinary World offers spectacular delights for animation fans willing to venture off the beaten path.



Holding the Man (2015) 

79% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

Heart-wrenching performances center Holding the Man, an achingly beautiful portrayal of love and death that may be too real for some.



Last Cab to Darwin (2015) 

91% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

In LAST CAB TO DARWIN, Rex (Michael Caton), a cab driver in the mining town Broken Hill, has spent his life avoiding getting close to people - even his best friend and occasional lover Polly (Ningali Lawford-Wolf), who lives across the road.



Our Little Sister (2015) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Our Little Sister uses the story of one fractured family to offer universal -- and deeply moving -- observations on the human condition.



Krisha (2015) 

97% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

Raw, bracingly honest, and refreshingly unconventional, Krisha wrings fresh -- and occasionally uncomfortable -- truths from a seemingly familiar premise.



James White (2015) 

91% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

Led by powerfully complementary performances from Christopher Abbott and Cynthia Nixon, James White offers an affecting calling card for debuting writer-director Josh Mond.



Sweet Bean (2015) 

82% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

Sweet Bean's deliberate pace demands patience, but the satisfying simplicity of its story -- and Kirin Kiki's absorbing performance -- yield an array of riches well worth the wait.



Marguerite (2015) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Touching, funny, and thoughtful, Marguerite honors its real-life inspiration with a well-acted and ultimately inspirational look at the nature of art and the value of a dream.



Right Now, Wrong Then (2015) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

Right Now, Wrong Then offers diverging perspectives on a chance meeting -- and thought-provoking observations on human interactions in general.



Lilting (2014) 

83% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

Skillfully weaving multiple delicate tonal strands into a quietly affecting whole, Lilting serves as a thoroughly compelling calling card for writer-director Hong Khaou.



Margarita with a Straw (2014) 

82% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Undeterred by cerebral palsy, she embarks on a journey of sexual discovery.



Diplomacy (2014) 

93% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

For filmgoers who value character development and smart dialogue over plot, Diplomacy yields rich, powerfully acted rewards.



Marie's Story (2014) 

69% of critics love it, but only 800 people have rated it.

Based on true events, Marie's Story recounts the courageous journey of a young nun and the lives she would change forever, confronting failures and discouragement with joyous faith and love.



Theeb (2014) 

97% of critics love it, but only 7,000 people have rated it.

Led by an outstanding performance from Jacir Eid Al-Hwietat in the title role, Theeb is a startlingly assured first effort from director/co-writer Naji Abu Nowar.



Güeros (2014) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

A striking effort that synthesizes disparate influences with inventive flair, Güeros marks a bold step forward for modern Mexican cinema.



Zero Motivation (2014) 

86% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

Darkly funny and understatedly absurd, Zero Motivation is a refreshing addition to the canon of irreverent war comedies -- and an intriguing calling card for writer-director Talya Lavie.



Kilo Two Bravo (2014) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

Kilo Two Bravo honors its fact-based story with an almost unbearably tense drama that captures the horrors -- and the human cost -- of modern warfare.



Court (2014) 

98% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

Court takes a penetrating, timely look at issues facing Indian society while serving as an excellent calling card for debuting writer-director Chaitanya Tamhane.



Metro Manila (2013) 

93% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

Infusing thriller tropes with a searing glimpse of modern-day corruption, Metro Manila is just as gripping as any action blockbuster -- and twice as thought-provoking.



Home from Home: Chronicle of a Vision (2013) 

84% of critics love it, but only 600 people have rated it.

Spectacular landscapes and an ultra-high definition shooting format elevate Edgar Reitz's Home Away From Home from an unforgettable story to a breathtaking cinematic experience.



The Inevitable Defeat of Mister & Pete (2013) 

89% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

The Inevitable Defeat of Mister & Pete uses its compelling streetwise setting -- and powerful performances from its young leads -- to offer a refreshing twist on the coming-of-age formula.



The Rocket (2013) 

96% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

A feel-good success crafted with care, Kim Mordaunt's story of two young kids in Laos is a heartfelt audience pleaser while remaining sensitive toward its subjects.



Child's Pose (2013) 

91% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

It isn't necessarily an easy watch, but thanks to Netzer's interesting direction and a riveting performance from Gheorghiu, Child's Pose is rewarding.



The Dance of Reality (2013) 

93% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

This long-overdue return from Alejandro Jodorowsky finds him just as overflowing with imagination -- and heart -- as fans have come to expect.



We Are the Best! (2013) 

96% of critics love it, but only 7,500 people have rated it.

Sweet, empathetic, and shot through with a palpable joy, We Are the Best! offers a tender tribute to the bittersweet tumult of adolescence.



A Touch of Sin (2013) 

93% of critics love it, but only 6,200 people have rated it.

Its screenplay isn't as graceful as the choreography of its action sequences, but A Touch of Sin offers enough stylishly satisfying violence to muscle past its rough spots.



Norte, the End of History (2013) 

91% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

Its four-hour length is undeniably imposing, but Norte, the End of History rewards patient viewers with an absorbing, visually expansive viewing experience.



A Wolf at the Door (2013) 

84% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Inspired by real events, Brazilian filmmaker Fernando Coimbra's debut feature captures the heightened anxiety of every parent's worst nightmare, casting a light upon the cruelties of which humans are capable.



Ilo Ilo (2013) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

Quietly compassionate and rich in detail, Ilo Ilo is a strikingly mature debut from writer-director Anthony Chen.



The Attack (2012) 

86% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

Tense and suspenseful while remaining smart and understated, The Attack honors its complex subject with an intelligent script and captivating performances.



The Patience Stone (2012) 

86% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

It may prove frustratingly slow for some viewers, but more contemplative filmgoers will find themselves rewarded by The Patience Stone's quietly fierce storytelling, as well as a searing starring turn from Golshifteh Farahani.



Hannah Arendt (2012) 

88% of critics love it, but only 6,200 people have rated it.

Led by a powerful performance from Barbara Sukowa, Hannah Arendt does a commendable job of dramatizing the life of a complex public figure.



War Witch (2012) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

War Witch is a mature, intense drama that embraces the bruatlity of its subject and invites the audience to sympathize with its protagonist's nightmarish circumstances.



Good Vibrations (2012) 

94% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

Directors Lisa Barros D'Sa and Glenn Leyburn team to tell the true story of Terri Hooley, the rebellious Belfast music lover who launched his own record label, dubbed "Good Vibrations," in the 1970s, and quickly emerged as a key figure in the Irish capitol's thriving underground punk scene.



Sister (2012) 

95% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Simon (Kacey Mottet Klein) lives with his older sister (Lea Seydoux) in a housing complex below a luxury Swiss ski resort.



Any Day Now (2012) 

79% of critics love it, but only 5,500 people have rated it.

However, when their unconventional living arrangement is discovered by the authorities, Rudy and Paul must fight a biased legal system to adopt the child they have come to love as their own.



The Other Son (2012) 

80% of critics love it, but only 5,100 people have rated it.

"The Other Son" is the moving and provocative tale of two young men -- one Israeli, the other Palestinian -- who discover they were accidentally switched at birth, and the complex repercussions facing them and their respective families.



Still Mine (2012) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

James Cromwell and Geneviève Bujold are outstanding in this tender, affecting, insightful drama about the bonds and sacrifices of marriage.



Tabu (2012) 

87% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

Acclaimed director Miguel Gomes returns with a sumptuous, eccentric two-part tale centered on Aurora, shown first as an impulsive, cantankerous elderly woman in present-day Lisbon.



The History of Future Folk (2012) 

94% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

High on quirky smarts and low on splashy special effects, The History of Future Folk is an unusual -- and unusually fun -- slice of sci-fi.



Out in the Dark (2012) 

75% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

One fateful night in Tel Aviv, he meets Roy (Aloni), an Israeli lawyer, and the two fall in love.



It's Such a Beautiful Day (2012) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,900 people have rated it.

A collection of three shorts by Don Hertzfeldt, It's Such a Beautiful Day is an impossibly dense and affecting piece of animated art.



Elena (2012) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

Winner of Cannes' Un Certain Regard Special Jury Prize, Elena is a gripping, modern twist on the classic noir thriller.



Pariah (2011) 

93% of critics love it, but only 6,900 people have rated it.

Pulsing with authenticity and led by a stirring lead performance from Adepero Oduye, Pariah is a powerful coming out/coming-of-age film that signals the arrival of a fresh new talent in writer/director Dee Rees.



North Sea Texas (2011) 

81% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

Strong direction and delicate performances save Noordzee, Texas from its narrative cliches.



The Snows of Kilimanjaro (2011) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

Despite losing his job, Michel lives happily with Marie-Claire.



Chico & Rita (2010) 

86% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

With an original soundtrack by legendary Cuban pianist and five-time Grammy-winning composer Bebo Valdes, Chico & Rita captures a defining moment in the evolution of history and jazz, and features the music of (and animated cameos by) Thelonious Monk, Charlie Parker, Cole Porter, Dizzy Gillespie, Woody Herman, Tito Puente, Chano Pozo, and others.



Amreeka (2009) 

87% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

A dramedy that's got a taste for the tragic as well as the poignantly comic, Amreeka adds a new sweetness to the hope and distress of the immigrant experience.



The Black Balloon (2008) 

87% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

A tender and witty portrayal of a family coping with autism, The Black Balloon is heartfelt without being schmaltzy or moralizing.



Idiots and Angels (2008) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

Angels And Idiots tells its story without dialogue but does include songs from such artists as Tom Waits, Moby, Pink Martini and Nicole Renaud.



Goodbye Solo (2008) 

94% of critics love it, but only 5,100 people have rated it.

An original and thoughtful human drama, Goodbye Solo looks at relationships and loneliness while proving director Ramin Bahrani's is an important American voice.



Sita Sings the Blues (2008) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

A tour de force for filmmaker Nina Paley, Sita Sings the Blues gives the Ramayana its animated due with a visually vibrant, dazzlingly imaginative triumph.



Conversations with My Gardener (2007) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

Sweet natured and gentle French drama, that is bittersweet but never maudlin, with impressive performances from the leads.



Roman de gare (2007) 

87% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

Claude Lelouch has crafted an engaging thriller about murder and romance with plenty of stylistic panache.



Ten Canoes (2006) 

98% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

Ten Canoes combines adventure, comedy, and anthropology to explore an Aborigine folk tale both fallibly human and legendary. Helmer Rolf de Heer depicts a barely represented oral tradition with a clean style.



Blame it on Fidel (2006) 

93% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

Blame it on Fidel is a charming comedy of manners, class, and politics, elevated by a remarkable performance from lead child actor Nina Kervel.



Kenny (2006) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,400 people have rated it.

Kenny uses its seemingly lowbrow mockumentary premise as the foundation for a well-acted and surprisingly thoughtful character study.



Reprise (2006) 

87% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

With Reprise, first-time director Joachim Trier effectively captures the spirit of young adulthood, and announces his arrival as a filmmaker to be watched.



Out of the Blue (2006) 

84% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

The film co-stars Karl Urban; Graeme Tetley co-authored the script with Sarkies.



Half Moon (2006) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Bahman Ghobadi's Half Moon is a beautiful and often humorous look into the lives of Kurdish wanderers.



Times and Winds (2006) 

87% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Lilting and meditative, Reha Erdem's story of three adolescents in rural Turkey captivates with intimate details and long takes of the endless countryside.



Tuya's Marriage (2006) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

The breathtaking landscapes of Inner Mongolia are a powerful backdrop for this quietly intense, dryly comical film.



Look Both Ways (2005) 

75% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

With animated sequences adding imaginative quirkiness to the mix, this movie about death and disaster is insightful, empathic, and more uplifting than one would think.



Pierrepoint: The Last Hangman (2005) 

77% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Director Adrian Shergold doesn't shy away from the darker elements of the movie's subject, and Timothy Spall is mesmerizing as the title character.



Man Push Cart (2005) 

87% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

This compassionate portrait of a New York City street vendor is as beautiful as it is melancholy.



The Beautiful Country (2004) 

77% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

The plight of Asian refugees is sensitively rendered, and the movie builds, with the help of Nolte, to a wrenchingly poignant conclusion.



Ae Fond Kiss... (2004) 

88% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

Casim Khan (Atta Yaqub) lives with his Punjabi-born Muslim family in Scotland.



Saving Face (2004) 

85% of critics love it, but only 8,600 people have rated it.

A charming tale of a love affair that overcomes cultural taboos.



Off the Map (2003) 

69% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

Excellent performances mark this leisurely paced film.



The Saddest Music in the World (2003) 

78% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

Guy Maddin perfectly recreates the look and feel of a 1930s in this bizarre picture.



Baadasssss! (2003) 

90% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

An entertaining and intriguing tribute to a father from his son.



The Memory of a Killer (2003) 

83% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

Even though The Memory of a Killer is standard genre fare, it is also engaging and stylish.



Better Luck Tomorrow (2002) 

81% of critics love it, but only 8,300 people have rated it.

A promising work by Lin, the energetic Better Luck Tomorrow is disturbing and thought-provoking.



In This World (2002) 

88% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

Using documentary-style filmmaking to blur the lines between fact and fiction. In This World tells a harrowing but important story about the plight of refugees.



The Grey Zone (2001) 

69% of critics love it, but only 8,100 people have rated it.

A grim and devastating tale of the Holocaust.



The House of Mirth (2000) 

81% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

Despite being a period piece, The House of Mirth's depiction of social cruelty still feels chilling and relevant for today.



Two Family House (2000) 

88% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

In 1956, factory worker and frustrated singer Buddy Visalo, who realizes his dream to buy a two family house in Staten Island for himself and his wife Estelle and convert the ground floor into a neighborhood bar where he can perform, encounters unexpected problems and romantic complications when attempting to evict tenants.



Dinner Rush (2000) 

91% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

With the aid of a witty script and a well-acted ensemble, Dinner Rush is a tasty dish.



Last Resort (2000) 

94% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Critics are raving about Last Resort, saying it's a convincing, touching tale. Particularly impressive is the lack of script during the film's shoot.



The Winslow Boy (1999) 

97% of critics love it, but only 5,200 people have rated it.

Just after the family toasts, Arthur discovers that his youngest son, Ronnie, is back early from the Naval College at Osbourne--dismissed for stealing a five shilling postal note.



Spring Forward (1999) 

87% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Shot in sequence over a one-year period, Spring Forward received a third-place mention for best first feature at the 1999 Toronto Film Festival.



Twin Falls Idaho (1999) 

77% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

In this film, conjoined twins Blake and Francis Falls share many vital organs.



Limbo (1999) 

71% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

When Joe meets Donna De Angelo (Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio), however, he starts to come out of his shell.



Felicia's Journey (1999) 

87% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

A solitary middle-aged bachelor and a naive Irish teenager transform one another's lives to arrive at a place of recognition, redemption and wisdom in Felicia's Journey, writer/director Atom Egoyan's adaptation of William Trevor's celebrated 1994 novel.



Liberty Heights (1999) 

87% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

A moving film with moments of humor, Liberty Heights succeeds in capturing the feel of the '50s with great performances and sensitive direction.



Ratcatcher (1999) 

84% of critics love it, but only 6,200 people have rated it.

Critics find Ratcatcher to be hauntingly beautiful, though its story is somewhat hard to stomach.



Jesus' Son (1999) 

81% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

(He certainly fails with Michelle).



Not One Less (1999) 

95% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

When he is called away to tend to his dying mother for a month, the Mayor calls in an inexperienced 13 year-old replacement, Wei Minzhi; much to Teacher Gao's dismay.



The General (1998) 

81% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

Throughout his adult life, Martin Carhillderived satisfaction from making fools out of authority figures.



Hilary and Jackie (1998) 

86% of critics love it, but only 7,800 people have rated it.

Brilliant performances, lush cinematography, and complex storytelling deserve audience's attention.



Last Night (1998) 

83% of critics love it, but only 8,200 people have rated it.

An engrossing, poignant film, Last Night examines the end of the world through humorous and thought-provoking dialogue.



Kirikou and the Sorceress (1998) 

96% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

Kirikou and the Sorceress is a beautifully uplifting throwback to a simpler animated era, with refreshingly unique art and a timeless soundtrack.



The Butcher Boy (1997) 

77% of critics love it, but only 7,200 people have rated it.

Neil Jordan's superb adaptation of Pat McCabe's disturbing 1992 novel about a 12-year-old Irish boy's descent into madness.



Career Girls (1997) 

87% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Two seemingly self-assured and successful friends reminisce about their college days only to unpack the emotional baggage they have both been carrying for six long years.



Eve's Bayou (1997) 

81% of critics love it, but only 7,900 people have rated it.

Finding her beliefs in family loyalty crumbling, the young girl visits voodoo priestess Elzora (Diahann Carroll).



Rosewood (1997) 

85% of critics love it, but only 7,300 people have rated it.

In early January 1923, a tiny Florida town primarily inhabited by prosperous African American families was burned to the ground by angry whites from a neighboring town.



Ulee's Gold (1997) 

94% of critics love it, but only 4,500 people have rated it.

Ulee retrieves her but runs into Jimmy's former partners who demand money from him.



The Wings of the Dove (1997) 

83% of critics love it, but only 7,600 people have rated it.

British director Ian Softley's take on this lesser-known Henry James novel offers a tightly-woven, witty look at clashing social classes in turn-of-the-century Europe as it tells the tale of a strong-willed aristocratic girl who takes drastic measures to marry her lower-class lover.



Citizen Ruth (1996) 

80% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

Yet Ruth soon finds her new friends are also only interested in her value as a media icon.



Jude (1996) 

80% of critics love it, but only 8,000 people have rated it.

Remaining quite true to the tone and narrative style of Thomas Hardy's ultimate tragic novel Jude the Obscure, this British period drama follows the hopeless attempts of a bright country boy to realize his dream of attending a university.



The Whole Wide World (1996) 

76% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Renee Zellweger and Vincent D'Onofrio both deliver fine performances and are a believable (if unconventional) romantic couple; D'Onofrio also co-produced.



My Family (1995) 

84% of critics love it, but only 4,900 people have rated it.

Featuring Jennifer Lopez in her first major big-screen role, Gregory Nava's My Family traces three generations of the Sanchez's, a Mexican-American family living in East Los Angeles.



Land and Freedom (1995) 

76% of critics love it, but only 7,100 people have rated it.

The internecine conflicts and heated passions of the Spanish Civil War, brought to glorious life by soft-smoldering firebrand Ken Loach.



The Secret of Roan Inish (1994) 

95% of critics love it, but only 6,800 people have rated it.

The Secret of Roan Inish is a gentle fairy tale filled with optimism that's suitable for the whole family.



Vanya on 42nd Street (1994) 

88% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

Beautiful performances and the subtle hand of master Louis Malle make this adaptation of Chekov's Uncle Vanya an eccentric presentation of an enduring classic.



Fear of a Black Hat (1993) 

85% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

Writer/director Rusty Cundieff's satire of gangsta rappers, focusing on a hiphop trio who release a Christmas album called "Ho Ho 'Hos."



King of the Hill (1993) 

96% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

A subtle, affecting, character-driven coming-of-age story, King of the Hill is one of Steven Soderbergh's best and most criminally overlooked films.



Raining Stones (1993) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Jim Allen wrote this comedy/drama about a poor British family struggling to raise the money for their daughter's first Communion dress.



A Midnight Clear (1992) 

86% of critics love it, but only 5,600 people have rated it.

Beautifully filmed and wonderfully acted, A Midnight Clear is a holiday war film in search of a wider audience.



One False Move (1992) 

98% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

Carl Franklin made his directorial bow with the story of three LA drug dealers who, after committing a rather messy murder, hide out in a rural Arkansas town.



Passion Fish (1992) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

Back home, Mary-Alice frightens off a succession of home-care nurses until a young black woman named Chantelle (Alfre Woodard) arrives to give the job a try.



City of Hope (1991) 

94% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Set in the fictional New Jersey metropolis of Hudson, three intricately interwoven tales involving real estate, robbery, and racial tension comprise a complex study of crime, corruption, and political machinery.



Enchanted April (1991) 

83% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

Mike Newell's adaptation of Elizabeth von Arnim's moves at a more generous pace than the 1935 version, allowing excellent performances from Miranda Richardson and Joan Plowright to flourish.



Homicide (1991) 

91% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

A Jewish homicide detective investigates a seemingly minor murder and falls in with a Zionist group as a result.



Let Him Have It (1991) 

81% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

Led by a gripping performance from Christopher Eccleston, Let Him Have It sounds a compelling call for justice on behalf of its real-life protagonist.



Proof (1991) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,500 people have rated it.

The story of a blind man's search for the ultimate truth.



Avalon (1990) 

82% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

The third of director Barry Levinson's autobiographical "Baltimore Trilogy" (the first two entries were Diner and Tin Men), Avalon covers nearly forty years in the lives of an immigrant Jewish family.



Life Is Sweet (1990) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

The youngish parents, Wendy (Alison Steadman) and Andy (Jim Broadbent) live with their 20-something twin daughters, Nicola (Jane Horrocks) and Natalie (Claire Skinner).



Metropolitan (1990) 

91% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

An ironically comic look at Manhattan's endangered debutante scene, Metropolitan chronicles the rise and ultimate decline of a group of young Park Avenue socialites who gather nightly to discuss love, honor, and the impending demise of their class.



A Dry White Season (1989) 

83% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Set in South Africa during the mid '70s when apartheid was still the norm, this provocative drama centers on a white schoolmaster's gradual awakening to the horrors of government-sanctioned racism.



Creature Comforts (1989) 

92% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

Creature Comforts is an Oscar-winning animated short from Aardman Animations and director Nick Park, the creator of the Wallace & Gromit series.



Longtime Companion (1989) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

Longtime Companion is a sensitive ensemble AIDS drama, lensed with sympathy which builds to a moving finale.



Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988) 

80% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

Bracingly original and beautifully composed, Distant Voices, Still Lives is an invigorating period drama that finds director Terence Davies in peak form.



Miracle Mile (1988) 

88% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Miracle Mile starts conventionally enough, with bashful musician Anthony Edwards going ga-ga over waitress Mare Winningham.



84 Charing Cross Road (1987) 

86% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

Despite several attempts, they never manage to meet.



The Year My Voice Broke (1987) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

The life of a teen in an isolated small town is the subject of Australian writer/director John Duigan's film, set in 1962 in New South Wales.



'Round Midnight (1986) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

Saxophonist Dexter Gordon portrays Dale Turner, a fictional musician inspired by a number of famed jazz figures, including Bud Powell and Lester Young.



Lost in America (1985) 

96% of critics love it, but only 5,200 people have rated it.

A satire of the American fantasy of leaving it all behind, Lost in America features some of Albert Brooks' best, most consistent writing and cultural jabs.



Murphy's Romance (1985) 

72% of critics love it, but only 5,600 people have rated it.

Newly divorced Emma Moriarty (Sally Field) moves herself and her young son to a small Arizona town, hoping to establish a horse farm.



The Hit (1984) 

84% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

After kidnapping Parker, nothing goes as planned.



Love Streams (1984) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

Robert has several women staying at his place (research sources!



Places in the Heart (1984) 

96% of critics love it, but only 7,800 people have rated it.

Places in the Heart is a quiet character piece with grand ambitions that it more than fulfills, thanks to absorbing work from writer-director Robert Benton and a tremendous cast.



Secret Honor (1984) 

76% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

'Secret Honor' is a filmed version of Donald Freed and Arnold Stone's one-man play wherein the disgraced Richard M. Nixon ruminates over his failed career and suggests that he was really nothing more than the puppet of a sinister "committee" seeking global power.



A Soldier's Story (1984) 

90% of critics love it, but only 7,000 people have rated it.

The cast of A Soldier's Story features early supporting performances from several African-American actors who would go on to greater prominence, including Denzel Washington, David Alan Grier, and Robert Townsend.



Never Cry Wolf (1983) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,000 people have rated it.

Based on the autobiographical novel by Farley Mowat, Carroll Ballard's film chronicles the work of Tyler (Charles Martin Smith), a biologist who sets out alone on a government-sponsored mission to study the lives of Arctic wolves, an experience which ultimately becomes a journey of self-discovery as well.



Tender Mercies (1983) 

85% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

Mac Sledge (Robert Duvall), a once-famous country western singer, wakes up broke, alone and hung over in a tiny Texas motel run by widowed Rosa Lee (Tess Harper).



Under Fire (1983) 

88% of critics love it, but only 4,900 people have rated it.

This outrage (which actually occurred when journalist Bill Stewart was inhumanly shot by a Somoza soldier in full view of the video camera) soon makes global news and helps to hasten the overthrow of the corrupt dictatorship.



The Draughtsman's Contract (1982) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,400 people have rated it.

Mrs. Herbert's daughter (Ann Louise Lambert), in turn, seduces Neville -- her relationship with her husband Talman (Hugh Fraser) has become boring.



Frances (1982) 

68% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

Other actual personages depicted herein include Clifford Odets (played by Jeffrey DeMunn), Harold Clurman (Jordan Charney) and Ralph Edwards (Donald Craig).



My Favorite Year (1982) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,200 people have rated it.

It is 1954, and the larger-than-life, swahbuckling movie star Alan Swann is set to make his first television appearance on the hugely popular show, The Comedy Cavalcade.



White Dog (1982) 

92% of critics love it, but only 4,900 people have rated it.

Julie Sawyer (Kristy McNichol) hits a handsome white dog with her car one night and then nurses it back to health.



Polyester (1981) 

89% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

Francine Fishpaw (Divine) is a housewife whose life has become a living hell.



Prince of the City (1981) 

91% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

Wired for sound, Williams almost immediately stumbles upon a police conspiracy to smuggle narcotics to informants in order to insure cooperation.



Gloria (1980) 

91% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

The film won the Golden Lion Award at the 1980 Berlin Film Festival.



My Bodyguard (1980) 

85% of critics love it, but only 6,900 people have rated it.

T. Bill debuts as an affectionate director, keenly aware of growing pains.



The Stunt Man (1980) 

89% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

The Stunt Man is a preposterously entertaining thriller with a clever narrative and Oscar-worthy (nomination, at least!) Peter O'Toole performance.



The Great Santini (1979) 

94% of critics love it, but only 4,000 people have rated it.

He drills his family unmercifully, like recruits.



The In-Laws (1979) 

90% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Dentist Sheldon Kornpett (Alan Arkin) is a respectable man.



Norma Rae (1979) 

88% of critics love it, but only 8,000 people have rated it.

Norma Rae, a young Southern woman working at a cotton mill, encounters a union organizer and decides to join the effort to reform working conditions.



North Dallas Forty (1979) 

87% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Muddled overall, but perceptive and brutally realistic, North Dallas Forty also benefits from strong performances by Nick Nolte and Charles Durning. Football fans will likely find it fascinating.



Wise Blood (1979) 

89% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

Set in the Deep South during the postwar era, Wise Blood stars Brad Dourif as an aimless veteran, who decides to become a Bible-thumping preacher (for a questionable concern called "The Church Wihout Christ") principally because he hasn't anything better lined up.



The Buddy Holly Story (1978) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,300 people have rated it.

Gary Busey's sterling performance as Buddy Holly graces this entertaining film biography of this pioneering rock and roll performer.



Martin (1978) 

90% of critics love it, but only 7,800 people have rated it.

George A. Romero's contribution to vampire lore contains the expected gore and social satire -- but it's also surprisingly thoughtful, and boasts a whopper of a final act.



An Unmarried Woman (1978) 

89% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

Paul Mazursky's An Unmarried Woman follows the turmoil of a woman named Erica (Jill Clayburgh), whose comfortable domestic life is thrown into turmoil when her husband Martin (Michael Murphy) reveals over lunch that he is in love with another woman.



Opening Night (1977) 

91% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Opening Night is as dense and difficult as one would expect from John Cassavetes, but even the director's detractors will be unable to deny the power of Gena Rowlands' performance.



Bound for Glory (1976) 

85% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

Based on the autobiography of iconic folk singer Woody Guthrie, who wrote "This Land Is Your Land."



The Day of the Locust (1975) 

64% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

The story, unfolding via flashback, is told from the viewpoint of a noted art director and features a number of ugly incidents from behind-the-scenes Tinseltown.



Farewell, My Lovely (1975) 

84% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

This remake of the 1944 film, 'Murder, My Sweet,' also based on the Raymond Chandler novel, concerns private eye Philip Marlowe's attempts to locate Velma, a former dancer at a seedy nightclub and the girlfriend of Moose Malloy, a petty criminal just out of prison.



Night Moves (1975) 

82% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

Private eye Harry Moseby is hired by actress Arlene Iverson to locate her missing daughter Delly.



Overlord (1975) 

86% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Quiet Tom leaves home and enters the world of war in the British Army with its anxious days of marching and training and waiting only to meet his quick and violent death on the beaches at Normandy on D-Day, June 6, 1944.



The Sunshine Boys (1975) 

81% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

Thanks to the sparkling chemistry between its stars and Herbert Ross' gentle direction, this sweetly ambling comedy ranks among Neil Simon's finest screen adaptations.



The Travelling Players (1975) 

85% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

In 1952 a travelling actor's troupe roams the countryside performing a popular Greek pastoral play, which soon becomes a thinly disguised version of the "Oresteia."



Alice in the Cities (1974) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

Phillip takes Alice in hand on a trek across Germany to locate the girl's grandmother.



California Split (1974) 

92% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

With a free-flowing storyline, much improvisation, and a multi-channel soundtrack, filmmaker Robert Altman creates a challenging, not always successful portrait of two different gamblers united by their compulsion for gaming.



Harry and Tonto (1974) 

87% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

Accompanied by his pet, an aged cat named Tonto, Harry sets out upon an odyssey to Los Angeles.



Thieves Like Us (1974) 

89% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

The film is a remake of They Live By Night, yet it is distinguished by Robert Altman's's distinctive, detailed characterizations.



Scenes from a Marriage (1974) 

88% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

Marianne and Johan always seemed like the perfect couple.



Bang the Drum Slowly (1973) 

91% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

Bang the Drum Slowly is a touching melodrama that explores the inner workings of a baseball club and its players' personalities with remarkable depth.



Coffy (1973) 

79% of critics love it, but only 8,400 people have rated it.

After her sister becomes a heroin addict, a nurse (Pam Grier) takes gun in hand and goes undercover to track down the dealers responsible for her sister's condition.



The Friends of Eddie Coyle (1973) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

The Friends of Eddie Coyle sees Robert Mitchum in transformative late-career mode in a gritty and credible character study.



O Lucky Man! (1973) 

82% of critics love it, but only 5,500 people have rated it.

al.)



The Paper Chase (1973) 

84% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

This filmization of John Jay Osborn Jr.'s novel Paper Chase ended up one of the surprise hits of the 1973-74 movie season.



Belladonna of Sadness (1973) 

86% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

Belladonna of Sadness has more than enough brilliant visual artistry to keep audiences enraptured even as the film's narrative reach slightly exceeds its grasp.



1776 (1972) 

68% of critics love it, but only 7,700 people have rated it.

With the Boston Harbor still stained from over-taxed British tea, a revolution is brewing in the colonies!



The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant (1972) 

86% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

Petra Von Kant (Margit Carstensen) is a fashion designer.



The Candidate (1972) 

89% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

The Candidate may not get all the details right when it comes to modern campaigning, but it captures political absurdity perfectly -- and boasts typically stellar work from Robert Redford to boot.



Fat City (1972) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

Fat City is a bleak, mordant, slice of life boxing drama that doesn't pull its punches.



Sounder (1972) 

88% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

After suffering months of poverty, the father (Paul Winfield) steals in order to support his family.



The Harder They Come (1972) 

89% of critics love it, but only 5,100 people have rated it.

This gritty, groundbreaking film brought reggae music to the international stage, made Jimmy Cliff a star worldwide.



Carnal Knowledge (1971) 

88% of critics love it, but only 7,500 people have rated it.

With a script by satirist and cartoonist Jules Feiffer, Mike Nichols's Carnal Knowledge (1971) ruthlessly exposed the damage wrought by pre-1960s sexual mores.



Minnie and Moskowitz (1971) 

78% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

The disparate duo meet in his lot.



A New Leaf (1971) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

Indigent playboy Graham (Walter Matthau), who has squandered his inherited trust fund and needs to get a new source of money, begins to ply his affections upon Henrietta.



Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971) 

92% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

This critically well-received movie was unexpectedly successful at the box office.



Two-Lane Blacktop (1971) 

94% of critics love it, but only 7,800 people have rated it.

The surface story is a quixotic cross country road race between dapper sociopath playboy Warren Oates driving a showroom GTO and ultra-laconic proto-grunge hippie gearheads James Taylor and Dennis Wilson behind the wheel of their primer gray souped-up '55 Chevy.



The Honeymoon Killers (1970) 

94% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

Martha Beck (Shirley Stoler) is a lonely nurse who takes care of her invalid mother in Mobile, Alabama.



The Boys in the Band (1970) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

closet case, and one midnight cowboy party favor gather in a Greenwich Village apartment for the birthday of self-described "ugly, pockmarked Jew fairy" Leonard Frey (later Motel the Tailor in Fiddler on the Roof) but nasty host Kenneth Nelson insists on playing those truth games.



Deep End (1970) 

89% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

Set at the fag-end of the '60s in a decidedly unglamorous and unswinging London (though actually filmed, very persuasively, in Hamburg), Skolimowski's pleasingly skewed variation on the coming-of-age sex comedy posits a bizarre, totally unsentimental education for its adolescent protagonist (Moulder-Brown), a somewhat naive school-leaver newly employed at a run-down swimming baths and obsessively pining for a colleague (Asher).



Performance (1970) 

84% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

This psychological crime thriller finds Chas (James Fox) as a crook on the run from the law.



The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1970) 

92% of critics love it, but only 6,400 people have rated it.

'Private Life' is both an elegiac evocation of late Victorian England and a boldly modern take on the dark side of the "real" Sherlock Holmes.



Scrooge (1970) 

75% of critics love it, but only 8,400 people have rated it.

Scrooge feels compassion for Tiny Tim (Richard Beaumont), the crippled but hopeful son of his underpaid and overworked bookkeeper Bob Crachit (David Collings).



Funeral Parade of Roses (1969) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

This violent dramatic bloodbath concerns a love triangle in a gay bar in Tokyo.



A Boy Named Charlie Brown (1969) 

94% of critics love it, but only 4,000 people have rated it.

The story centers on a national spelling bee.



Medium Cool (1969) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

"I love to shoot film" is the sanguine motto of TV lensman John Cassellis (Robert Forster) in Haskell Wexler's 1969 Medium Cool, a semi-documentary investigation of image-making and politics.



Oh! What a Lovely War (1969) 

76% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

The awesome all-star cast includes Laurence Olivier, Ralph Richardson, Maggie Smith, John Gielgud, Michael Redgrave, Jack Hawkins, John Mills, Susannah York, Dirk Bogarde and Phyllis Calvert.



Faces (1968) 

85% of critics love it, but only 6,800 people have rated it.

Richard leaves his sexually unresponsive wife Maria to cavort with a prostitute.



Petulia (1968) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

Petulia's forward nature and desperate tenderness betray her fear of her sullen, abusive, pretty-boy husband (Richard Chamberlain).



The Swimmer (1968) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

In this film, Burt Lancaster plays a wealthy, middle-aged advertising man, who embarks on a revelatory journey through suburban Connecticut.



Targets (1968) 

88% of critics love it, but only 5,100 people have rated it.

A startling directorial debut by Peter Bogdanovich mixes an homage to Boris Karloff horror films with a timely sniper story to create a thriller with modern baggage and old school shock and awe.



Marat/Sade (1967) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,100 people have rated it.

Film debut of Glenda Jackson.



Accident (1967) 

85% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

A film arguably ahead of its time, Accident boasts strong performances to match its thought-provoking themes.



The Taming of the Shrew (1967) 

85% of critics love it, but only 7,100 people have rated it.

It may not be reverent enough for purists, but This Taming of the Shrew is too funny -- and fun -- for the rest of us to resist.



Far from the Madding Crowd (1967) 

72% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

Julie Christie plays Bathsheba Everdene, a country heiress who is loved by three different men: Terence Stamp, Peter Finch and Alan Bates.



Hombre (1967) 

92% of critics love it, but only 6,800 people have rated it.

When the passengers fight back, Boone takes Rush as a hostage.



The President's Analyst (1967) 

80% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

When Coburn becomes expendable, he finds a pair of strong allies in the form of likeable political assassin Godfrey Cambridge and gay Soviet spy Severn Darden.



Born Free (1966) 

93% of critics love it, but only 7,000 people have rated it.

Joy and George Adamson (portrayed by real-life married couple Virginia McKenna and Bill Travers) involuntarily domesticate several lions while living in Kenya.



King of Hearts (1966) 

93% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

During World War I, Scottish soldier Private Plumpick (Academy Award (R) Nominee, Alan Bates) is sent on a mission to a village in the French countryside to disarm a bomb set by the retreating German army.



Chimes at Midnight (1965) 

97% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

In this memorable adaptation of Shakespeare's Henry IV, Parts 1 and 2, the friendship between the rogue Falstaff and the wild Prince Hal is fated to end when the young man gives up his dissolute life and assumes the throne England after the death of his father, King Henry IV.



The Collector (1965) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,600 people have rated it.

A neurotic recluse whose only pleasure is butterfly collecting, Clegg wins $200,000 in the British Football Pool.



The Killers (1964) 

78% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

Though it can't best Robert Siodmak's classic 1946 version, Don Siegel's take on the Ernest Hemingway story stakes out its own violent territory, and offers a terrifically tough turn from Lee Marvin.



The Naked Kiss (1964) 

92% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

She falls in love with Grant (Michael Dante), the town's philanthropist and most eligible bachelor, but a sinister secret he's hiding mars their chance for a happy ending.



Nothing But a Man (1964) 

95% of critics love it, but only 900 people have rated it.

Duff, an itinerant black railroad laborer (Ivan Dixon), romances and marries Josie, a small-town preacher's daughter (Abbey Lincoln).



The Pumpkin Eater (1964) 

63% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Anne Bancroft stars as a restless, twice-married British woman with six children, whose third husband is a fledgling screenwriter (Peter Finch).



Topkapi (1964) 

90% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

Sexy Melina Mercouri (Mrs. Dassin) is probably the best of the batch: the others are faffling Robert Morley, unreliable Gilles Segal and Jess Hahn.



Billy Liar (1963) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

He takes comfort in an understanding girl named Liz (Julie Christie).



Lilies of the Field (1963) 

90% of critics love it, but only 6,800 people have rated it.

In this film, a traveling laborer meets five nuns in the Arizona desert.



Shock Corridor (1963) 

93% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

The late Sam Fuller's feral nightmare about a gung-ho reporter seeking his Pulitizer story inside a mental institution.



This Sporting Life (1963) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

Appropriately hard-hitting on narrative as well as physical levels, The Sporting Life remains a British "kitchen sink" classic that's beautiful to look at and leaves a lingering mark.



Advise & Consent (1962) 

81% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

Among the participants are veteran Dixiecrat Charles Laughton, freshman Senator Don Murray and powerseeker George Grizzard.



The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1962) 

70% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

Dry and full of angst, this British New Wave classic features potent social commentary and a star making performance by Tom Courtenay as a textbook example of the "angry young man."



Lonely Are the Brave (1962) 

90% of critics love it, but only 4,000 people have rated it.

David Miller helmed screenwriter Dalton Trumbo's mournful masterpiece, a hymn to rugged individualism and freedom slowly being strangled to death by voracious urban development.



Long Day's Journey Into Night (1962) 

93% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

Set in 1912 New England, the story takes place in the summer home of aging actor James Tyrone (Ralph Richardson) and his family.



Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

An excellent production with one of Quinn's best performances, ably assisted by Rooney and Gleason.



A Raisin in the Sun (1961) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,400 people have rated it.

His wife Ruth (Ruby Dee) takes in laundry to help make ends meet and watches over their son.



Elmer Gantry (1960) 

96% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

Elmer Gantry (Burt Lancaster), a drunken, dishonest street preacher allegedly patterned on Billy Sunday, wrangles a job with the travelling tent ministry conducted by Sister Sharon Falconer (Jean Simmons).



Wild River (1960) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

Some dated fuzzy-headed liberalism aside, Wild River is a masterful recreation of a difficult, complex period in American history.



The Mouse That Roared (1959) 

89% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

In this film, the tiny country of Grand Fenwick faces economic ruin when their chief export of wine loses out to a California vintage.



The Nun's Story (1959) 

93% of critics love it, but only 6,800 people have rated it.

Though frequently disillusioned in her efforts to spread good will -- at one point she is nearly killed by a mental patient (Colleen Dewhurst) -- Sister Luke perseveres.



Room at the Top (1959) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

Ruthless young working-class Englishman Laurence Harvey takes a job in a North Country village controlled by millionaire Donald Wolfit.



Our Man in Havana (1959) 

86% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

Graham Greene wrote this witty comedy inspired by Cold War paranoia.



Auntie Mame (1958) 

92% of critics love it, but only 8,600 people have rated it.

Auntie Mame began as a novel by Patrick Dennis (aka Ed Fitzgerald), then was adapted into a long-running Broadway play by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee.



The Horse's Mouth (1958) 

92% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

The painting is completed and promptly destroyed.



I Want to Live! (1958) 

92% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

However, the film belongs to Susan Hayward who gives a intense, shattering performance without one false note.



The Long, Hot Summer (1958) 

87% of critics love it, but only 7,300 people have rated it.

In time, Will gets the idea that Quick might be a good match for his daughter Clara (Joanne Woodward) and a better choice to take over his business dealings than Jody.



Man of the West (1958) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

In this western, Link Jones travels to Fort Worth to hire a new schoolteacher there.



Separate Tables (1958) 

71% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

Among the guests are an alleged war hero (David Niven), a timid spinster (Deborah Kerr) and her domineering mother (Gladys Cooper), and a divorced couple (Burt Lancaster, Rita Hayworth) trying to re-ignite their romance despite the presence of his mistress (Wendy Hiller).



Shadows (1958) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

Shadows was John Cassavetes' first directorial effort.



Forty Guns (1957) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

The story centers on Barbara Stanwyck who plays a powerful female landowner who basically runs an entire Arizona county with an iron fist.



Curse of the Demon (1957) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,000 people have rated it.

In this film, American Professor Dana Andrews investigates a devil-worshipping cult active in England.



The Three Faces of Eve (1957) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Ironically, Joanne Woodward would herself play a psychologist confronted with a multiple-personality case in the Emmy-winning 1976 TV movie Sybil.



Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? (1957) 

90% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Director Frank Tashlin uses Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter as an excuse to take satirical potshots at everything from TV commercials to the unwieldiness of CinemaScope.



Baby Doll (1956) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

Enter crafty Sicilian Eli Wallach (who, like supporting actor Rip Torn, makes his film debut herein), who covets both Malden's wife and business.



Bigger Than Life (1956) 

92% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

A seriously ill schoolteacher becomes dependent on a "miracle" drug that begins to affect his sanity.



The Harder They Fall (1956) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

This offering is one of the finest boxing films ever made, following a sportswriter who suffers a number of moral dilemmas as he agrees to promote a fixed fight.



While the City Sleeps (1956) 

88% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

This leads to a great deal of infighting amongst Price's reporters, especially cynical journalist Dana Andrews, photographer James Craig, "sob sister" Ida Lupino, and wire service chief George Sanders.



Written on the Wind (1956) 

81% of critics love it, but only 6,000 people have rated it.

Rock Hudson falls in love with Stack's nymphomaniac sister Dorothy Malone.



Blackboard Jungle (1955) 

75% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

This gritty, unflinching film centers on Richard Dadier, a war vet who gets a job teaching in a tough inner-city school.



Lola Montès (1955) 

83% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

Max Ophuls' final film (and his only movie in color) is a cinematic tour-de-force masquerading as a biography, in this case a dazzling fictionalized life of the notorious 19th century dancer, actress, and courtesan.



The Man with the Golden Arm (1955) 

85% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

Based on the novel by Nelson Algren, the film stars Frank Sinatra as Frankie Machine, expert card dealer (hence the title).



Summertime (1955) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,200 people have rated it.

In this romantic drama a Yankee secretary goes on a Venetian vacation and ends up falling in love with a handsome native.



Hobson's Choice (1954) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

The winner of the British Film Institute "Best Film" award of 1954, Hobson's Choice chalked up another international success for director David Lean.



Magnificent Obsession (1954) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

The dead man's wife, Jane Wyman, refuses to accept Hudson's apologies.



Salt of the Earth (1954) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

With the exception of five actors (including future Waltons star Will Geer), the cast is comprised of non-professionals, mostly participants of the real-life strike action upon which the film is based.



The Naked Spur (1953) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,500 people have rated it.

His first quarry is fugitive killer Robert Ryan.



The Band Wagon (1953) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

A lavish, enduring backstage musical from Vincente Minnelli, The Band Wagon tells the tale of Tony Hunter (Fred Astaire who was 54 at the time) a multi-talented but aging movie star who heads for the Great White Way in hopes of bolstering his flagging career.



Julius Caesar (1953) 

95% of critics love it, but only 7,100 people have rated it.

Joseph L. Mankiewicz directed this exquisite version of William Shakespeare's play.



Little Fugitive (1953) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

A boy from Brooklyn, wrongly led to believe that he killed another child with his rifle by an 'ornery older brother, flees to the fantasy and fun of Coney Island to escape in this all-but forgotten drama that proves that big budgets and studios are not always needed to create a memorable, internationally distinguished gem.



Clash by Night (1952) 

73% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Desperate for security and happiness, Barbara Stanwyck enters into a loveless marriage with cloddish but likeable fisherman Paul Douglas.



The Importance of Being Earnest (1952) 

88% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

Jack is also in love with Algernon's attractive cousin Gwendolen (Joan Greenwood).



The Lusty Men (1952) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

Complications arise when Mitchum falls hard for Kennedy's wife.



Pat and Mike (1952) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy take competition to a romantic-comic highpoint in this elegantly directed sports comedy by George Cukor.



The Browning Version (1951) 

88% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

The film's rich montage of incident and character detail builds to intense emotional heights that make this version of +The Browning Version a classic.



On Dangerous Ground (1951) 

93% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

The film includes a memorable score by Alfred Hitchcock favorite Bernard Herrmann.



The Steel Helmet (1951) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

One of the greatest war films ever made, this film still retains considerable power when compared with today's more explicit offerings.



The Tales of Hoffmann (1951) 

85% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

An anthology of fantastic and romantic adventures, recounted by the fableist Hoffmann (Robert Rounseville) and featuring Moira Shearer (The Red Shoes), Ludmilla Tcherina, and Ann Ayars.



Born Yesterday (1950) 

95% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

In this adaptation of Garson Kanin's Broadway hit, Judy Holliday stars as Billie Dawn, a strident ex-chorus girl who is the mistress of junk tycoon Harry Brock.



Panic in the Streets (1950) 

95% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

The carrier was an illegal alien, murdered by criminals Jack Palance and Zero Mostel.



Where the Sidewalk Ends (1950) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,000 people have rated it.

In disposing of the body, Dixon inadvertently places the blame for the killing on cab driver Jiggs Taylor (Tom Tully).



Champion (1949) 

91% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

He wins his early fights with ease and eventually becomes champion of the world.



A Letter to Three Wives (1949) 

94% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

Thelma Ritter shows up in a hilarious unbilled bit as a slatternly domestic, while an equally uncredited Carl "Alfalfa" Switzer makes a quick entrance and exit as a bellhop.



Passport to Pimlico (1949) 

92% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

Passport to Pimlico is one of the most charmingly whimsical Ealing Studios comedies of the late 1940s-early 1950s.



Whisky Galore (1949) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

The tiny Scots Island of Todday suffers from a wartime whisky shortage.



D.O.A. (1949) 

87% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

Frank Bigelow (Edmond O'Brien), a certified public accountant, goes on vacation in San Francisco.



Brighton Rock (1948) 

94% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

Pinky, the psychotic, razor-toting gang leader, romances and marries a teenage waitress in order to keep her silent about one of his nefarious crimes.



Call Northside 777 (1948) 

73% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

This drama was based upon the true story of journalist Jim McGuire and wrongly convicted prisoner Joe Majczek.



Easter Parade (1948) 

90% of critics love it, but only 8,300 people have rated it.

A nightclub performer hires a naive chorus girl to become his new dance partner to make his former partner jealous and to prove he can make any partner a star.



The Fallen Idol (1948) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

Young Bobby Henrey idolizes household butler Ralph Richardson.



Force of Evil (1948) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

Joe Morse wants to consolidate all the small-time numbers racket operators into a single powerful organization.



I Remember Mama (1948) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

The film is narrated by Mama's daughter Katrin (Barbara Bel Geddes), recalling the trials and tribulations of her family in turn-of-the-century San Francisco.



Letter from an Unknown Woman (1948) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,000 people have rated it.

Golden Age Hollywood romance doesn't get much better than Letter From an Unknown Woman, a powerful tale of doomed love.



Macbeth (1948) 

88% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

This haunting, eccentric Macbeth may be hampered by budget constraints, but Orson Welles delivers both behind and in front of the camera.



Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (1948) 

82% of critics love it, but only 8,300 people have rated it.

With Loy and Douglas in supporting roles, its family entertainment with the classic Grant style.



Portrait of Jennie (1948) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

In this film, Joseph Cotten plays an artist who meets an intriguing schoolgirl named Jennie.



They Live by Night (1948) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

"This boy



Unfaithfully Yours (1948) 

93% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

Preston Sturges' Unfaithfully Yours is a typically witty and wild screwball comedy starring Rex Harrison as a symphony conductor named Alfred de Carter who is convinced his wife (Linda Darnell) is having an affair.



Body and Soul (1947) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

The cinematography is also exceptional.



Crossfire (1947) 

80% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Because of the film's subtext of prejudice and anti-Semitism, filmmaker Edward Dmytryk became one of the first 10 Hollywood figures blacklisted by McCarthy's House Committee on Un-American Activities.



Kiss of Death (1947) 

86% of critics love it, but only 4,000 people have rated it.

To make matters even more complicated, Louie soon comes calling and pressures Nick into testifying against Tommy.



Nightmare Alley (1947) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

Nightmare Alley is the story of a con man who recruits a couple of amatuers as his partners.



Odd Man Out (1947) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

Meanwhile, a vast police manhunt is launched -- a net that closes steadily, remorselessly in upon him.



Green for Danger (1946) 

76% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

At a World War II emergency hospital, a postman dies under anesthetic during a relatively minor operation.



The Spiral Staircase (1946) 

85% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

Spiral Staircase is a thriller about a mute servant (Dorothy McGuire) who works in an spooky mansion that may house a killer who has been murdering women who have physical deformities.



The Yearling (1946) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

Claude Jarman Jr. plays Jody Baxter, the lonely son of just-getting-by farmers Pa and Ma Baxter (Gregory Peck and Jane Wyman).



The Bells of St. Mary's (1945) 

94% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

In this follow-up to Going My Way (1944), Bing Crosby repeats his Oscar-winning characterization of happy-go-lucky priest Father O'Malley.



Christmas in Connecticut (1945) 

87% of critics love it, but only 4,900 people have rated it.

This solves everything, right?



Dead of Night (1945) 

96% of critics love it, but only 6,200 people have rated it.

With four accomplished directors contributing, Dead of Night is a classic horror anthology that remains highly influential.



Leave Her to Heaven (1945) 

90% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

She dismisses the local handyman and then drowns his crippled half-brother Danny (Darryl Hickman).



The Southerner (1945) 

90% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Director Jean Renoir also wrote the script for The Southerner--in fluent English rather than French, as mental exercise.



A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1945) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,500 people have rated it.

The story is told from the point of view of daughter Peggy Ann Garner, a clear-eyed realist who nonetheless would like to believe in her pie-in-the-sky father, whom she loves,



Blithe Spirit (1945) 

75% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

Rex Harrison plays a novelist, newly married to straight-laced Constance Cummings.



Going My Way (1944) 

78% of critics love it, but only 7,300 people have rated it.

Bing Crosby and Barry Fitzgerald are eminently likable, and film is pleasantly sentimental, but Going My Way suffers from a surplus of sweetness.



Hail the Conquering Hero (1944) 

94% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

In this film, Eddie Bracken plays the son of a WWI Marine hero who is the first in his small town to sign up for military service.



Ministry of Fear (1944) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Lang's famous expressionistic style is somewhat muted here, but Henry Sharp's crisp black-and-white cinematography sets a suitably unsettling mood, and the twists and double-crosses of Greene's story unfold at an appropriately quick pace.



National Velvet (1944) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,800 people have rated it.

National Velvet makes the most of a breakout performance from Elizabeth Taylor, delivering a timeless family-friendly tearjerker that avoids straying into the sentimental.



This Happy Breed (1944) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

This was the second of four collaborations between author Noel Coward and director David Lean.



The Uninvited (1944) 

94% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

Once the film's deep dark secret is revealed (courtesy of a virtuoso "mad speech" by supporting actress Cornelia Otis Skinner), Roderick is able to single-handedly exorcise the estate and claim Stella as his bride.



Five Graves to Cairo (1943) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

Protagonist John J. Bramble (Franchot Tone) is stranded in the Sahara, the lone survivor of a British tank crew.



Hangmen Also Die! (1943) 

83% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Czech loyalist Brian Donlevy assassinates the vicious Gestapo leader Heydrich, then goes into hiding.



Heaven Can Wait (1943) 

91% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

At 21, Henry elopes with lovely Martha Strabel (Gene Tierney) stealing her away from her stuffy fiance Albert Van Cleve (Allyn Joslyn), Henry's cousin.



I Walked with a Zombie (1943) 

92% of critics love it, but only 7,100 people have rated it.

Evocative direction by Jacques Tourneur collides with the low-rent production values of exploitateer Val Lewton in I Walked with a Zombie, a sultry sleeper that's simultaneously smarmy, eloquent and fascinating.



Lassie Come Home (1943) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,200 people have rated it.

Based on the novel by Eric Knight (originally serialized in The Saturday Evening Post), Lassie Come Home was released quite some time after Knight's death.



The More the Merrier (1943) 

94% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

This is why elderly Benjamin Dingle (Charles Coburn) is obliged to share a tiny DC apartment with pretty Connie Milligan (Jean Arthur) and handsome Joe Carter (Joel McCrea).



Jane Eyre (1943) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

But Jane's employer, the brooding, tormented Edward Rochester (Orson Welles), terrifies the prim young governess.



The Miracle of Morgan's Creek (1943) 

88% of critics love it, but only 4,500 people have rated it.

The Miracle of Morgan's Creek finds director Preston Sturges at his most zanily subversive -- not to mention hilarious.



I Married a Witch (1942) 

95% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

After several hilarious through-the-years examples (the Civil War-era Fredric March runs off to battle rather than endure his wife's nagging), we are brought up to 1942.



In Which We Serve (1942) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

The real star of In Which We Serve is the British destroyer Torrin.



Kings Row (1942) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

In this dark drama, set shortly before WWII, two young men grow up to discover that their idyllic and wholesome Midwestern hometown has a seamy side rife with jealousy, pettiness, and horrific acts.



The Major and the Minor (1942) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

This comedy is about the budding romance between an engaged soldier and a woman posing as a 12-year-old girl.



The Palm Beach Story (1942) 

96% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

After a deliberately confusing pre-credit sequence (not explained until the film's punch line), Tom Jeffers (Joel McCrea) and Gerry Jeffers (Claudette Colbert) are married.



Road to Morocco (1942) 

91% of critics love it, but only 4,900 people have rated it.

An Oscar was bestowed upon Johnny Burke and Jimmy Van Heusen's ballad "Moonlight Becomes You".



The Talk of the Town (1942) 

92% of critics love it, but only 4,500 people have rated it.

George Stevens' Talk of the Town is a quick-witted comedy driven by wonderful performances by Cary Grant, Ronald Colman and Jean Arthur.



Went the Day Well? (1942) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

But in this stirring, startlingly violent (for its time) masterwork of WW2 propaganda, that's exactly where the plucky locals of Bramley End engage the enemy.



This Gun for Hire (1942) 

92% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

As Raven ducks and dodges the police, detective Michael Crane (Robert Preston) is hot on the trail of Bewster and Gates.



Woman of the Year (1942) 

91% of critics love it, but only 7,200 people have rated it.

As the first romantic-comedy pairing of Tracey and Hepburn, the stars' chemistry is off to a working start and the film's sparkling comedy smooths out any rough patches.



Ball of Fire (1941) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,200 people have rated it.

A splendidly funny twist on the story of Snow White, Ball of Fire boasts a pair of perfect leads in Gary Cooper and Barbara Stanwyck.



The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

The film is also known as All That Money Can Buy and Daniel and the Devil.



Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

Robert Montgomery plays saxophone-playing boxer Joe Pendleton, who insists upon piloting his own plane, much to the consternation of his manager Max Corkle (James Gleason).



The Little Foxes (1941) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

This adaptation of Lillian Hellman's play involves the corrupt machinations of a wealthy Southern family.



Never Give a Sucker an Even Break (1941) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

In this film, W. C. Fields heads to Esoteric studios to pitch a story idea to producer Franklin Pangborn.



Penny Serenade (1941) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,200 people have rated it.

It seems hopeless until kindly adoption agency head Miss Oliver (Beulah Bondi) helps smooth their path.



The Bank Dick (1940) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

In this film, the matchless W. C. Fields plays Egbert Souse, a bibulous denizen of Lompoc who supports his family by winning radio contests.



Christmas in July (1940) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

This modest Preston Sturges comedy stars Dick Powell as an office clerk dreaming of better things and Ellen Drew as his more pragmatic girlfriend.



The Great McGinty (1940) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

McGinty chalks up $74 worth of votes, and when local ward heeler William Demarest can't pony up, McGinty takes direct action by trying to beat up The Boss (Akim Tamiroff).



Night Train to Munich (1940) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

This movie, made just prior to WWII, gave a more temperate view of the Nazis than later movies.



The Sea Hawk (1940) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,400 people have rated it.

Another highlight was the best adventure film score ever written by Erich Wolfgang Korngold; and the script's seriousness was nailed down by various not-so-veiled references not to 16th century Spain but 20th century Nazi Germany.



They Drive by Night (1940) 

95% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

Two hard-boiled truckers are committed to a life as wildcatters.



Dark Victory (1939) 

85% of critics love it, but only 6,800 people have rated it.

A major success and perennial favorite, Dark Victory was later remade as Stolen Hours with Susan Hayward and as a TV movie starring Elizabeth Montgomery.



Destry Rides Again (1939) 

95% of critics love it, but only 6,800 people have rated it.

His detractors laugh even louder when Destry signs on as deputy to drunken sheriff Wash Dimsdale (Charles Winninger).



Dodge City (1939) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

Starring dashing Errol Flynn and beauteous Olivia de Havilland, Dodge City begins with a nailbiting race between a stagecoach and locomotive--representing the transition from the Old West to the new one.



Gunga Din (1939) 

92% of critics love it, but only 7,900 people have rated it.

Now it became the tale of three eternally brawling British sergeants stationed in colonial India: Cutter (Cary Grant), McChesney (Victor McLaglen) and Ballantine (Douglas Fairbanks Jr.).



The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939) 

100% of critics love it, but only 8,200 people have rated it.

In 15th century France, a gypsy girl is framed for murder by the infatuated Chief Justice, and only the deformed bellringer of Notre Dame Cathedral can save her.



Midnight (1939) 

92% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

The farcical complications come thick and fast, culminating in a less funny but still entertaining courtroom scene, in which the never-married Ameche and Colbert must request a divorce!



Of Mice and Men (1939) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

Despite being endlessly parodied in Warner Bros. and MGM cartoons ("Which way did he, go George?



Son of Frankenstein (1939) 

91% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Boris Karloff's final appearance as the Monster is a fitting farewell before the series descended into self-parody.



Young Mr. Lincoln (1939) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

In this biography of Abraham Lincoln, the President is wonderfully portrayed by Henry Fonda.



Boys Town (1938) 

89% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

This film focuses on Father Edward J. Flanagan, whose philosophy that no boy will grow up bad if given a chance in life culminates in his formation of Boys Town in Omaha, Nebraska.



Pygmalion (1938) 

94% of critics love it, but only 5,100 people have rated it.

She tells him, "I sold flowers.



Captains Courageous (1937) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,600 people have rated it.

Spencer Tracy earned an Academy Award for his performance in Captains Courageous and even sings a bit; the story was parodied years later (with a few rather drastic changes) in the Chris Elliott vehicle Cabin Boy.



The Good Earth (1937) 

94% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

The Good Earth is Irving Thalberg's final film production.



The Life of Emile Zola (1937) 

75% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Well-written, well-meaning and solidly acted, The Life of Emile Zola film may ultimately be more earnest than dramatically engaging.



Make Way for Tomorrow (1937) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

When that fails, they must find some place to stay.



Stage Door (1937) 

95% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Lucille Ball, Eve Arden, and Ann Miller also play actresses in this very funny movie,



A Star Is Born (1937) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,500 people have rated it.

replies Esther defiantly.



Topper (1937) 

94% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

The musical score by longtime Hal Roach composer Marvin Hatley is perfectly attuned to the zany goings-on (including snatches of background music from Roach's earlier Laurel and Hardy comedies), while Hoagy Carmichael appears briefly on screen to introduce the film's signature tune, "Old Man Moon."



Young and Innocent (1937) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

The actual villain, whose identity is never in doubt, is George Curzon.



After the Thin Man (1936) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,400 people have rated it.

The Charleses are sucked into another murder case via Nick's lovely cousin Elissa Landi, whose husband Alan Marshall has vanished.



The Devil-Doll (1936) 

86% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Oscar-winner Lionel Barrymore ("It's a Wonderful Life") stars in this classic horror thriller about a Devil's Island escapee who shrinks murderous slaves and sells them to his victims as dolls.



Dodsworth (1936) 

87% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

In this highly acclaimed adaptation of Sinclair Lewis's novel, Walter Huston plays Sam Dodsworth, a good-hearted, middle-aged man who runs an auto manufacturing firm.



Fury (1936) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

Fritz Lang's first American film is a vigorous and perceptive indictment of mob law, starring Spencer Tracy and Sylvia Sidney.



Libeled Lady (1936) 

81% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

In this film, William Powell and Myrna Loy star as Bill Chandler and Connie Allenbury.



The Informer (1935) 

91% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

When director John Ford remade The Informer in 1935, the role of the tragic Irish roisterer Gypo Nolan went to Cyril's brother Victor McLaglen.



Ruggles of Red Gap (1935) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

During one of the Earl's nocturnal forays, nouveau riche American cattle baron Egbert Floud (Charles Ruggles) wins Ruggles in a poker game.



Babes in Toyland (1934) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

Two bumbling apprentices to the master toymaker of Toyland try to raise money to help Little Bo-Peep and her sweetheart Tom-Tom.



The Black Cat (1934) 

87% of critics love it, but only 5,600 people have rated it.

Making the most of its Karloff-Lugosi star pairing and loads of creepy atmosphere, The Black Cat is an early classic in the Universal monster movie library.



The Gay Divorcee (1934) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

One of the finest Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers musicals ever made, this film stars Rogers as a woman seeking a divorce.



It's a Gift (1934) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

In this film, W.C. Fields is in fine fettle as small-town grocer Harold Bissonette.



The Scarlet Empress (1934) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

Complex, visually stunning, and breathtakingly intense, The Scarlet Empress overpowers its flaws with a confident vigor befitting its legendary subject.



Tarzan and His Mate (1934) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

Accompanying Cavanaugh is Neil Hamilton the former fiance of Jane Porter.



Twentieth Century (1934) 

87% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Despite his successful efforts at turning her into a star, theatrical producer Oscar Jaffe is persona non grata to actress Lily Garland - a situation that he attempts to fix when a coincidence places the two aboard the same train.



Baby Face (1933) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

When her father dies, this "bound-for-bigger-things" blonde heads to NYC going to work in a bank, where she uses beauty and charms to quickly move up the ladder.



Dinner at Eight (1933) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

In this comedy/drama, social butterfly Mrs. Oliver Jordan arranges a dinner party that will benefit the business of her husband.



42nd Street (1933) 

95% of critics love it, but only 8,300 people have rated it.

Julian Marsh, a successful Broadway director, produces a new show, in spite of his poor health.



Lady for a Day (1933) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

In this film, May Robson plays Apple Annie, a slatternly Broadway apple peddler.



Little Women (1933) 

91% of critics love it, but only 7,500 people have rated it.

While Jo is away, Amy falls in love and marries Jo's old flame Laurie Laurence (Douglass Montgomery).



The Private Life of Henry VIII. (1933) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

Alexander Korda's look at the reign of England's oft-married monarch stars Charles Laughton as the title character.



Queen Christina (1933) 

89% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

Greta Garbo stars as the title character, a 17th-century Swedish monarch whose life is chronicled from her rise to the throne, to the moment she gave it up for the love of a Spanish ambassador.



Zero for Conduct (1933) 

92% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

The shortest of French filmmaker Jean Vigo's two feature-length films, Zero for Conduct (Zero de Conduite) is also arguably his most influential.



Blonde Venus (1932) 

56% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

In this film, Marlene Dietrich stars as Helen Faraday, a German cabaret singer in the States whose husband, Ned, falls ill.



The Most Dangerous Game (1932) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

This top-notch first screen incarnation (shot on sets built for King Kong (1933)) of the famous short story was redone many times but rarely to such excellent effect.



The Old Dark House (1932) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

This atmospheric thriller features an unforgettable post-Frankenstein horror role for Boris Karloff, as the hulking, disfigured butler Morgan.



Shanghai Express (1932) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

Two notorious women of the night are aboard a train that is hijacked by rebel Chinese.



Tarzan the Ape Man (1932) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

The original and definitive Tarzan sound movie -- following several silent films on the same subject -- stuck fairly closely to the novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs.



Island of Lost Souls (1932) 

96% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

Led by a note-perfect performance from Charles Laughton, Island of Lost Souls remains the definitive film adaptation of its classic source material.



Hell's Angels (1930) 

76% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Several early scenes establish Lyon and Hall as unregenerate lotharios, setting up their romantic rivalry over two-timing socialite Jean Harlow.



The Cocoanuts (1929) 

95% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

A fast-talking Miami hotel manager tries to stay in business during the Florida land rush.



The Cameraman (1928) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,600 people have rated it.

Fast-paced and funny, this silent Buster Keaton comedy has" the Great Stone Face" playing an aspiring newsreel cameraman who falls in love with an office girl and tries to impress her by getting the scoop on a Chinese tong war.



The Crowd (1928) 

95% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

John and Mary are eventually married, raising two children in their tiny New York tenement (complete with a balky toilet-the first time that this particular bathroom fixture ever appeared in an American film).



The Docks of New York (1928) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

He saves Betty Compson from committing suicide; though the girl displays little gratitude, the inebriated Bancroft impulsively marries her.



The Last Command (1928) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Plot inconsistencies aside, The Last Command is a stunning cinematic achievement, combining the harsh realities of Russia and Hollywood with vonSternberg's unerring sense of visual beauty.



The Man Who Laughs (1928) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Though the property was later optioned by Kirk Douglas, The Man Who Laughs was never remade.



The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog (1927) 

95% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

British matinee idol Ivor Novello plays Jonathan Drew, a quiet, secretive young man who rents a room in a London boarding house.



The Cat and the Canary (1927) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Remade three times in the sound era, this silent version starring Laura LaPlante is considered the definitive rendering.



College (1927) 

88% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

One of Buster's lesser -- but still classic -- silent features.



Underworld (1927) 

84% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

A series of "art" titles fill the screen to establish the mood: "A great city in the dead of night



Wings (1927) 

94% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

Subsequent war epics may have borrowed heavily from the original Best Picture winner, but they've all lacked Clara Bow's luminous screen presence and William Wellman's deft direction.



The Big Parade (1925) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

Rich, clean-cut American hero John Gilbert plunges into World War I and some of the most emotionally shattering battle scenes ever filmed.



Seven Chances (1925) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

The hilariously inventive comedy culminates with one of Buster Keaton's most renowned set pieces that finds him pursued through the streets of Los Angeles by a gaggle of wannabe-wives - as well as scores of massive, dislodged boulders.



The Navigator (1924) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,500 people have rated it.

A funny, touching story, this is the tale of a wealthy couple who find themselves cast adrift in an empty cruise liner.



The Thief of Bagdad (1924) 

96% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

It requires some viewing commitment, but this beautifully assembled showcase for Douglas Fairbanks' acting offers some splendid treats for classic film fans.



Greed (1924) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,200 people have rated it.

There he meets and befriends Marcus Schouler (Jean Hersholt).



The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923) 

95% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

A heart-rending take on the classic book, with a legendary performance by Lon Chaney.



Our Hospitality (1923) 

95% of critics love it, but only 6,000 people have rated it.

En route, Keaton befriends pretty Natalie Talmadge, who invites him to dinner.



Orphans of the Storm (1921) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

In this film, Henriette brings her blind sister Louise to Paris, in search of a surgeon who might be able to restore her sister's sight.



Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920) 

92% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

In 1920, filmgoers were treated to no fewer than two different film versions of Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.



Way Down East (1920) 

94% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

New York's Museum of Modern Art obtained a set of prints of Griffith's classic 1920 movie Way Down East and restored them, helped along by the rediscovery of the film's original musical score by Louis Silvers and William F. Peters.



Broken Blossoms (1919) 

95% of critics love it, but only 6,000 people have rated it.

Thought-provoking and beautifully filmed, D.W. Griffith's Broken Blossoms presents a master at the top of his form.