Documentaries and art movies have been filtered out. These are movies that have fewer than 5,000 votes by audience members, but at least 25 votes from critics. These movies are then filtered so that only the ones that have at least 85 percent of critics enjoying the movie are shown.

The Wizard of Lies (2017) 

71% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

The Wizard of Lies doesn't really shed much new light on its fact-based story, but thanks to solid direction and a talented cast, it still proves consistently watchable.



The Killing of a Sacred Deer (2017) 

73% of critics love it, but only 200 people have rated it.

The highly anticipated drama The Killing of a Sacred Deer reunites director Yorgos Lanthimos with The Lobster star Colin Farrell who plays Steven, a charismatic surgeon forced to make an unthinkable sacrifice after his life starts to fall apart and the behaviour of a teenage boy he has taken under his wing turns sinister.



Divines (2016) 

86% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

In a ghetto near Paris where drugs and religion reign supreme, Dounia is hungry for her share of power and success.



Ethel & Ernest (2016) 

94% of critics love it, but only 600 people have rated it.

An entertaining and heart-warming story about two people who fall in love against the background of immense social change in the mid 20th Century.



Hairspray Live! (2016) 

79% of critics love it, but only 900 people have rated it.

Hairspray Live! shimmers with outstanding performances, an engaging story, and songs that let its stars shine.



Neruda (2016) 

94% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

Inventive, intelligent, and beautifully filmed, Neruda transcends the traditional biopic structure to look at the meaning beyond the details of its subject's life.



Quand on a 17 ans (2016) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

Being 17 rides the roiling emotions of adolescence through a coming-of-age melodrama whose narrative turbulence smartly reflects the confusion of its protagonists.



The Age of Shadows (2016) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

The Age of Shadows justifies its imposing length with a richly detailed period drama whose sprawling size is matched by strong acting, impressive craft, and narrative depth.



The Young Offenders (2016) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Jock is a legendary bike thief who plays a daily game of cat-and-mouse with the bike-theft-obsessed Garda Sergeant Healy.



Hamilton's America (2016) 

100% of critics love it, but only 300 people have rated it.

A commendable introduction to the Broadway phenomenon, Hamilton's America serves up a delightful dose of behind-the-scenes footage, perceptive commentators, and -- perhaps most gratifying -- Miranda's infectious enthusiasm for the historical icon himself.



James White (2015) 

91% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Led by powerfully complementary performances from Christopher Abbott and Cynthia Nixon, James White offers an affecting calling card for debuting writer-director Josh Mond.



Parched (2015) 

94% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

Parched world premiered at the 2015 Toronto International Film Festival.



Last Cab to Darwin (2015) 

90% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

In LAST CAB TO DARWIN, Rex (Michael Caton), a cab driver in the mining town Broken Hill, has spent his life avoiding getting close to people - even his best friend and occasional lover Polly (Ningali Lawford-Wolf), who lives across the road.



Krisha (2015) 

97% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

Raw, bracingly honest, and refreshingly unconventional, Krisha wrings fresh -- and occasionally uncomfortable -- truths from a seemingly familiar premise.



Court (2014) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

Court takes a penetrating, timely look at issues facing Indian society while serving as an excellent calling card for debuting writer-director Chaitanya Tamhane.



Margarita with a Straw (2014) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,100 people have rated it.

Undeterred by cerebral palsy, she embarks on a journey of sexual discovery.



The Inevitable Defeat of Mister & Pete (2013) 

91% of critics love it, but only 4,500 people have rated it.

The Inevitable Defeat of Mister & Pete uses its compelling streetwise setting -- and powerful performances from its young leads -- to offer a refreshing twist on the coming-of-age formula.



Ilo Ilo (2013) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Quietly compassionate and rich in detail, Ilo Ilo is a strikingly mature debut from writer-director Anthony Chen.



Bethlehem (2013) 

78% of critics love it, but only 1,100 people have rated it.

Balancing complex Middle Eastern politics against a universal human drama, director Yuval Adler fashions Bethlehem into a thought-provoking, well-acted character study.



The History of Future Folk (2012) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

High on quirky smarts and low on splashy special effects, The History of Future Folk is an unusual -- and unusually fun -- slice of sci-fi.



Teddy Bear (2012) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

The 38-year-old bodybuilder Dennis would really like to find true love.



Good Vibrations (2012) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

Directors Lisa Barros D'Sa and Glenn Leyburn team to tell the true story of Terri Hooley, the rebellious Belfast music lover who launched his own record label, dubbed "Good Vibrations," in the 1970s, and quickly emerged as a key figure in the Irish capitol's thriving underground punk scene.



Elena (2012) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

Winner of Cannes' Un Certain Regard Special Jury Prize, Elena is a gripping, modern twist on the classic noir thriller.



Yossi (2012) 

86% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Smart, moving, and deeply empathetic, Yossi is a thoughtful examination of love and grief.



Amreeka (2009) 

87% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

A dramedy that's got a taste for the tragic as well as the poignantly comic, Amreeka adds a new sweetness to the hope and distress of the immigrant experience.



Idiots and Angels (2008) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Angels And Idiots tells its story without dialogue but does include songs from such artists as Tom Waits, Moby, Pink Martini and Nicole Renaud.



Sita Sings the Blues (2008) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

A tour de force for filmmaker Nina Paley, Sita Sings the Blues gives the Ramayana its animated due with a visually vibrant, dazzlingly imaginative triumph.



Roman de gare (2007) 

87% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

Claude Lelouch has crafted an engaging thriller about murder and romance with plenty of stylistic panache.



Dialogue avec mon jardinier (2007) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

Sweet natured and gentle French drama, that is bittersweet but never maudlin, with impressive performances from the leads.



Sanxia haoren (2006) 

91% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Zhangke spellbindingly captures the human cost of rapid industrialization in modern China.



Out of the Blue (2006) 

84% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

The film co-stars Karl Urban; Graeme Tetley co-authored the script with Sarkies.



Man Push Cart (2005) 

87% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

This compassionate portrait of a New York City street vendor is as beautiful as it is melancholy.



The Last Hangman (2005) 

77% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

Director Adrian Shergold doesn't shy away from the darker elements of the movie's subject, and Timothy Spall is mesmerizing as the title character.



The Beautiful Country (2004) 

77% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

The plight of Asian refugees is sensitively rendered, and the movie builds, with the help of Nolte, to a wrenchingly poignant conclusion.



Zero Day (2003) 

68% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

American independent filmmaker Benjamin Coccio makes his writing and directing debut with the pseudo-documentary drama Zero Day.



In This World (2002) 

88% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

Using documentary-style filmmaking to blur the lines between fact and fiction. In This World tells a harrowing but important story about the plight of refugees.



Friends: The Stuff You've Never Seen (2001) 

87% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

The Exorcist has withstood the test of time, and it still has that renegade feel and the power to shock.



The Incredible Adventures of Wallace & Gromit (2001) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

A compilation of the first three Wallace & Gromit short films: "A Grand Day Out", "The Wrong Trousers", and "A Close Shave".



Homicide: The Movie (2000) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

Several members past and present of the Baltimore Police Department's homicide squad are brought back together when their former skipper and current mayoral candidate, Al "G" Giardelli (Yaphet Kotto), is gunned down by a would-be assassin.



Dinner Rush (2000) 

90% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

With the aid of a witty script and a well-acted ensemble, Dinner Rush is a tasty dish.



Two Family House (2000) 

88% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

In 1956, factory worker and frustrated singer Buddy Visalo, who realizes his dream to buy a two family house in Staten Island for himself and his wife Estelle and convert the ground floor into a neighborhood bar where he can perform, encounters unexpected problems and romantic complications when attempting to evict tenants.



Last Resort (2000) 

94% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

Critics are raving about Last Resort, saying it's a convincing, touching tale. Particularly impressive is the lack of script during the film's shoot.



Une liaison pornographique (1999) 

85% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

Jacques Viala, Paul Pavel, Herve Sogne.



Spring Forward (1999) 

87% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Shot in sequence over a one-year period, Spring Forward received a third-place mention for best first feature at the 1999 Toronto Film Festival.



Slam (1998) 

61% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

In prison, he meets Lauren Bell, a beautiful writing teacher who recognizes Raymond's unique talents and inspires him to use his unique power of creative expression.



Career Girls (1997) 

87% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

Two seemingly self-assured and successful friends reminisce about their college days only to unpack the emotional baggage they have both been carrying for six long years.



The Hanging Garden (1997) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

A troubled homosexual man returns to his super-dysfunctional family in Nova Scotia to attend the wedding of his foul-mouthed sister and his former friend.



The Young Poisoner's Handbook (1995) 

85% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

Graham begins his career by slowly poisoning his step-mum with tainted sweets and altered medicine.



Heavy (1995) 

85% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

His mother, Dolly owns the establishment.



In the Bleak Midwinter (1995) 

80% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

Director and star Kenneth Branagh would in fact release his own film version of Shakespeare's classic play a year later, but this comedy provides his fictional counterpart with far less in terms of production value.



Vanya on 42nd Street (1994) 

88% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

Beautiful performances and the subtle hand of master Louis Malle make this adaptation of Chekov's Uncle Vanya an eccentric presentation of an enduring classic.



Fear of a Black Hat (1993) 

85% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Writer/director Rusty Cundieff's satire of gangsta rappers, focusing on a hiphop trio who release a Christmas album called "Ho Ho 'Hos."



City of Hope (1991) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Set in the fictional New Jersey metropolis of Hudson, three intricately interwoven tales involving real estate, robbery, and racial tension comprise a complex study of crime, corruption, and political machinery.



Let Him Have It (1991) 

80% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

Led by a gripping performance from Christopher Eccleston, Let Him Have It sounds a compelling call for justice on behalf of its real-life protagonist.



Avalon (1990) 

82% of critics love it, but only 4,000 people have rated it.

The third of director Barry Levinson's autobiographical "Baltimore Trilogy" (the first two entries were Diner and Tin Men), Avalon covers nearly forty years in the lives of an immigrant Jewish family.



A Dry White Season (1989) 

80% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

Set in South Africa during the mid '70s when apartheid was still the norm, this provocative drama centers on a white schoolmaster's gradual awakening to the horrors of government-sanctioned racism.



Longtime Companion (1989) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

The ensemble drama is told through a series of vignettes that begins with the first New York Times report on the mysterious "cancer" that had resulted in the deaths of a growing number of homosexual men and ends eight years later, after the disease has thoroughly and devastatingly affected the movie's close-knit core group of characters.



Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988) 

78% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Bracingly original and beautifully composed, Distant Voices, Still Lives is an invigorating period drama that finds director Terence Davies in peak form.



The Year My Voice Broke (1987) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

The life of a teen in an isolated small town is the subject of Australian writer/director John Duigan's film, set in 1962 in New South Wales.



'Round Midnight (1986) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Saxophonist Dexter Gordon portrays Dale Turner, a fictional musician inspired by a number of famed jazz figures, including Bud Powell and Lester Young.



Secret Honor (1984) 

76% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

'Secret Honor' is a filmed version of Donald Freed and Arnold Stone's one-man play wherein the disgraced Richard M. Nixon ruminates over his failed career and suggests that he was really nothing more than the puppet of a sinister "committee" seeking global power.



Wise Blood (1979) 

89% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

Set in the Deep South during the postwar era, Wise Blood stars Brad Dourif as an aimless veteran, who decides to become a Bible-thumping preacher (for a questionable concern called "The Church Wihout Christ") principally because he hasn't anything better lined up.



The Great Santini (1979) 

94% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

He drills his family unmercifully, like recruits.



North Dallas Forty (1979) 

87% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

Muddled overall, but perceptive and brutally realistic, North Dallas Forty also benefits from strong performances by Nick Nolte and Charles Durning. Football fans will likely find it fascinating.



Bound for Glory (1976) 

84% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

Based on the autobiography of iconic folk singer Woody Guthrie, who wrote "This Land Is Your Land."



The Day of the Locust (1975) 

64% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

The story, unfolding via flashback, is told from the viewpoint of a noted art director and features a number of ugly incidents from behind-the-scenes Tinseltown.



The Sunshine Boys (1975) 

81% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

Thanks to the sparkling chemistry between its stars and Herbert Ross' gentle direction, this sweetly ambling comedy ranks among Neil Simon's finest screen adaptations.



Farewell, My Lovely (1975) 

84% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

This remake of the 1944 film, 'Murder, My Sweet,' also based on the Raymond Chandler novel, concerns private eye Philip Marlowe's attempts to locate Velma, a former dancer at a seedy nightclub and the girlfriend of Moose Malloy, a petty criminal just out of prison.



Smile (1975) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

While much humor is found in the brutal competitiveness of the young contestants, the film's sharpest barbs are saved for the pageant's shallow yet driven organizers.



Overlord (1975) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

Quiet Tom leaves home and enters the world of war in the British Army with its anxious days of marching and training and waiting only to meet his quick and violent death on the beaches at Normandy on D-Day, June 6, 1944.



Harry and Tonto (1974) 

87% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Accompanied by his pet, an aged cat named Tonto, Harry sets out upon an odyssey to Los Angeles.



California Split (1974) 

92% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

With a free-flowing storyline, much improvisation, and a multi-channel soundtrack, filmmaker Robert Altman creates a challenging, not always successful portrait of two different gamblers united by their compulsion for gaming.



Thieves Like Us (1974) 

89% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

The film is a remake of They Live By Night, yet it is distinguished by Robert Altman's's distinctive, detailed characterizations.



Bang the Drum Slowly (1973) 

88% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

Bang the Drum Slowly is a touching melodrama that explores the inner workings of a baseball club and its players' personalities with remarkable depth.



Kanashimi no Beradonna (1973) 

83% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

This well-crafted Japanese animated feature adapts the novel Belladonna by Jules Michelet in a unique manner.



Sounder (1972) 

88% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

After suffering months of poverty, the father (Paul Winfield) steals in order to support his family.



Minnie and Moskowitz (1971) 

83% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

The disparate duo meet in his lot.



A New Leaf (1971) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Indigent playboy Graham (Walter Matthau), who has squandered his inherited trust fund and needs to get a new source of money, begins to ply his affections upon Henrietta.



Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971) 

91% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

This critically well-received movie was unexpectedly successful at the box office.



Out 1, noli me tangere (1971) 

100% of critics love it, but only 600 people have rated it.

Carlotta Films US will release OUT 1: Noli me Tangere in its full 12 hour 55 minute original version, newly restored and digitized for nationwide theatrical and home release.



The Boys in the Band (1970) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

closet case, and one midnight cowboy party favor gather in a Greenwich Village apartment for the birthday of self-described "ugly, pockmarked Jew fairy" Leonard Frey (later Motel the Tailor in Fiddler on the Roof) but nasty host Kenneth Nelson insists on playing those truth games.



Deep End (1970) 

88% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

Set at the fag-end of the '60s in a decidedly unglamorous and unswinging London (though actually filmed, very persuasively, in Hamburg), Skolimowski's pleasingly skewed variation on the coming-of-age sex comedy posits a bizarre, totally unsentimental education for its adolescent protagonist (Moulder-Brown), a somewhat naive school-leaver newly employed at a run-down swimming baths and obsessively pining for a colleague (Asher).



The Honeymoon Killers (1970) 

94% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

Martha Beck (Shirley Stoler) is a lonely nurse who takes care of her invalid mother in Mobile, Alabama.



Medium Cool (1969) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

"I love to shoot film" is the sanguine motto of TV lensman John Cassellis (Robert Forster) in Haskell Wexler's 1969 Medium Cool, a semi-documentary investigation of image-making and politics.



A Boy Named Charlie Brown (1969) 

94% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

The story centers on a national spelling bee.



Oh! What a Lovely War (1969) 

75% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

The awesome all-star cast includes Laurence Olivier, Ralph Richardson, Maggie Smith, John Gielgud, Michael Redgrave, Jack Hawkins, John Mills, Susannah York, Dirk Bogarde and Phyllis Calvert.



Petulia (1968) 

90% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Petulia's forward nature and desperate tenderness betray her fear of her sullen, abusive, pretty-boy husband (Richard Chamberlain).



Marat/Sade (1967) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Film debut of Glenda Jackson.



Far from the Madding Crowd (1967) 

72% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

Julie Christie plays Bathsheba Everdene, a country heiress who is loved by three different men: Terence Stamp, Peter Finch and Alan Bates.



The President's Analyst (1967) 

80% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

When Coburn becomes expendable, he finds a pair of strong allies in the form of likeable political assassin Godfrey Cambridge and gay Soviet spy Severn Darden.



Accident (1967) 

85% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

A film arguably ahead of its time, Accident boasts strong performances to match its thought-provoking themes.



Nothing But a Man (1964) 

95% of critics love it, but only 800 people have rated it.

Duff, an itinerant black railroad laborer (Ivan Dixon), romances and marries Josie, a small-town preacher's daughter (Abbey Lincoln).



Seance on a Wet Afternoon (1964) 

84% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Adapted by director Bryan Forbes from a novel by Mark McShane, Seance on a Wet Afternoon is a compelling psychological melodrama made doubly powerful by Stanley's mesmerizing performance.



The Pumpkin Eater (1964) 

63% of critics love it, but only 900 people have rated it.

Anne Bancroft stars as a restless, twice-married British woman with six children, whose third husband is a fledgling screenwriter (Peter Finch).



Billy Liar (1963) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

He takes comfort in an understanding girl named Liz (Julie Christie).



This Sporting Life (1963) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Adapted by David Storey from his own novel, this drama stars Richard Harris as an athletic coal miner who aspires to the greener pastures of professional rugby.



Long Day's Journey Into Night (1962) 

93% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Set in 1912 New England, the story takes place in the summer home of aging actor James Tyrone (Ralph Richardson) and his family.



Wild River (1960) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Some dated fuzzy-headed liberalism aside, Wild River is a masterful recreation of a difficult, complex period in American history.



Our Man in Havana (1959) 

86% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

Graham Greene wrote this witty comedy inspired by Cold War paranoia.



Room at the Top (1959) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

Ruthless young working-class Englishman Laurence Harvey takes a job in a North Country village controlled by millionaire Donald Wolfit.



I Want to Live! (1958) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

However, the film belongs to Susan Hayward who gives a intense, shattering performance without one false note.



The Horse's Mouth (1958) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

The painting is completed and promptly destroyed.



Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? (1957) 

90% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Director Frank Tashlin uses Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter as an excuse to take satirical potshots at everything from TV commercials to the unwieldiness of CinemaScope.



Forty Guns (1957) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

The story centers on Barbara Stanwyck who plays a powerful female landowner who basically runs an entire Arizona county with an iron fist.



While the City Sleeps (1956) 

88% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

This leads to a great deal of infighting amongst Price's reporters, especially cynical journalist Dana Andrews, photographer James Craig, "sob sister" Ida Lupino, and wire service chief George Sanders.



Magnificent Obsession (1954) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

The dead man's wife, Jane Wyman, refuses to accept Hudson's apologies.



Salt of the Earth (1954) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

With the exception of five actors (including future Waltons star Will Geer), the cast is comprised of non-professionals, mostly participants of the real-life strike action upon which the film is based.



Little Fugitive (1953) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

A boy from Brooklyn, wrongly led to believe that he killed another child with his rifle by an 'ornery older brother, flees to the fantasy and fun of Coney Island to escape in this all-but forgotten drama that proves that big budgets and studios are not always needed to create a memorable, internationally distinguished gem.



The Importance of Being Earnest (1952) 

93% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

Jack is also in love with Algernon's attractive cousin Gwendolen (Joan Greenwood).



Clash by Night (1952) 

73% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

Desperate for security and happiness, Barbara Stanwyck enters into a loveless marriage with cloddish but likeable fisherman Paul Douglas.



Pat and Mike (1952) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy take competition to a romantic-comic highpoint in this elegantly directed sports comedy by George Cukor.



The Lusty Men (1952) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Complications arise when Mitchum falls hard for Kennedy's wife.



On Dangerous Ground (1951) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

The film includes a memorable score by Alfred Hitchcock favorite Bernard Herrmann.



The Steel Helmet (1951) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

One of the greatest war films ever made, this film still retains considerable power when compared with today's more explicit offerings.



The Browning Version (1951) 

88% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

The film's rich montage of incident and character detail builds to intense emotional heights that make this version of +The Browning Version a classic.



The Tales of Hoffmann (1951) 

85% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

An anthology of fantastic and romantic adventures, recounted by the fableist Hoffmann (Robert Rounseville) and featuring Moira Shearer (The Red Shoes), Ludmilla Tcherina, and Ann Ayars.



Whisky Galore! (1949) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

The tiny Scots Island of Todday suffers from a wartime whisky shortage.



Champion (1949) 

91% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

He wins his early fights with ease and eventually becomes champion of the world.



Passport to Pimlico (1949) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

Passport to Pimlico is one of the most charmingly whimsical Ealing Studios comedies of the late 1940s-early 1950s.



Portrait of Jennie (1948) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

In this film, Joseph Cotten plays an artist who meets an intriguing schoolgirl named Jennie.



Macbeth (1948) 

88% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

This haunting, eccentric Macbeth may be hampered by budget constraints, but Orson Welles delivers both behind and in front of the camera.



I Remember Mama (1948) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

The film is narrated by Mama's daughter Katrin (Barbara Bel Geddes), recalling the trials and tribulations of her family in turn-of-the-century San Francisco.



They Live by Night (1948) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

"This boy



Force of Evil (1948) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Joe Morse wants to consolidate all the small-time numbers racket operators into a single powerful organization.



Unfaithfully Yours (1948) 

93% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

Preston Sturges' Unfaithfully Yours is a typically witty and wild screwball comedy starring Rex Harrison as a symphony conductor named Alfred de Carter who is convinced his wife (Linda Darnell) is having an affair.



Life with Father (1947) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

In this faithful film adaptation of the longest-running non-musical play in Broadway history, William Powell stars as Clarence Day, the benevolent despot of his 1880s New York City household.



Green for Danger (1947) 

75% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

At a World War II emergency hospital, a postman dies under anesthetic during a relatively minor operation.



Brighton Rock (1947) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

Pinky, the psychotic, razor-toting gang leader, romances and marries a teenage waitress in order to keep her silent about one of his nefarious crimes.



The Yearling (1946) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Claude Jarman Jr. plays Jody Baxter, the lonely son of just-getting-by farmers Pa and Ma Baxter (Gregory Peck and Jane Wyman).



Blithe Spirit (1945) 

72% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

Rex Harrison plays a novelist, newly married to straight-laced Constance Cummings.



Hail the Conquering Hero (1944) 

94% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

In this film, Eddie Bracken plays the son of a WWI Marine hero who is the first in his small town to sign up for military service.



This Happy Breed (1944) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

This was the second of four collaborations between author Noel Coward and director David Lean.



Five Graves to Cairo (1943) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

Protagonist John J. Bramble (Franchot Tone) is stranded in the Sahara, the lone survivor of a British tank crew.



Hangmen Also Die! (1943) 

83% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

Czech loyalist Brian Donlevy assassinates the vicious Gestapo leader Heydrich, then goes into hiding.



The More the Merrier (1943) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

This is why elderly Benjamin Dingle (Charles Coburn) is obliged to share a tiny DC apartment with pretty Connie Milligan (Jean Arthur) and handsome Joe Carter (Joel McCrea).



Went the Day Well? (1942) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

But in this stirring, startlingly violent (for its time) masterwork of WW2 propaganda, that's exactly where the plucky locals of Bramley End engage the enemy.



Kings Row (1942) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

In this dark drama, set shortly before WWII, two young men grow up to discover that their idyllic and wholesome Midwestern hometown has a seamy side rife with jealousy, pettiness, and horrific acts.



The Major and the Minor (1942) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

This comedy is about the budding romance between an engaged soldier and a woman posing as a 12-year-old girl.



Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

Robert Montgomery plays saxophone-playing boxer Joe Pendleton, who insists upon piloting his own plane, much to the consternation of his manager Max Corkle (James Gleason).



The Great McGinty (1940) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

McGinty chalks up $74 worth of votes, and when local ward heeler William Demarest can't pony up, McGinty takes direct action by trying to beat up The Boss (Akim Tamiroff).



Christmas in July (1940) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

This modest Preston Sturges comedy stars Dick Powell as an office clerk dreaming of better things and Ellen Drew as his more pragmatic girlfriend.



Midnight (1939) 

92% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

The farcical complications come thick and fast, culminating in a less funny but still entertaining courtroom scene, in which the never-married Ameche and Colbert must request a divorce!



Boys Town (1938) 

89% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

This film focuses on Father Edward J. Flanagan, whose philosophy that no boy will grow up bad if given a chance in life culminates in his formation of Boys Town in Omaha, Nebraska.



The Good Earth (1937) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

The Good Earth is Irving Thalberg's final film production.



The Devil-Doll (1936) 

86% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

Oscar-winner Lionel Barrymore ("It's a Wonderful Life") stars in this classic horror thriller about a Devil's Island escapee who shrinks murderous slaves and sells them to his victims as dolls.



The Informer (1935) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

When director John Ford remade The Informer in 1935, the role of the tragic Irish roisterer Gypo Nolan went to Cyril's brother Victor McLaglen.



Mad Love (1935) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

In his first American film, Peter Lorre portrays egg-bald Dr. Gogol.



Twentieth Century (1934) 

87% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

Despite his successful efforts at turning her into a star, theatrical producer Oscar Jaffe is persona non grata to actress Lily Garland - a situation that he attempts to fix when a coincidence places the two aboard the same train.



The Scarlet Empress (1934) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Complex, visually stunning, and breathtakingly intense, The Scarlet Empress overpowers its flaws with a confident vigor befitting its legendary subject.



Babes in Toyland (1934) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

Two bumbling apprentices to the master toymaker of Toyland try to raise money to help Little Bo-Peep and her sweetheart Tom-Tom.



It's a Gift (1934) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

In this film, W.C. Fields is in fine fettle as small-town grocer Harold Bissonette.



Tarzan and His Mate (1934) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

Accompanying Cavanaugh is Neil Hamilton the former fiance of Jane Porter.



Baby Face (1933) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

When her father dies, this "bound-for-bigger-things" blonde heads to NYC going to work in a bank, where she uses beauty and charms to quickly move up the ladder.



The Private Life of Henry VIII. (1933) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

Alexander Korda's look at the reign of England's oft-married monarch stars Charles Laughton as the title character.



Blonde Venus (1932) 

57% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

In this film, Marlene Dietrich stars as Helen Faraday, a German cabaret singer in the States whose husband, Ned, falls ill.



Hell's Angels (1930) 

76% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

Several early scenes establish Lyon and Hall as unregenerate lotharios, setting up their romantic rivalry over two-timing socialite Jean Harlow.



The Man Who Laughs (1928) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

Though the property was later optioned by Kirk Douglas, The Man Who Laughs was never remade.



The Docks of New York (1928) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

He saves Betty Compson from committing suicide; though the girl displays little gratitude, the inebriated Bancroft impulsively marries her.



The Last Command (1928) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Plot inconsistencies aside, The Last Command is a stunning cinematic achievement, combining the harsh realities of Russia and Hollywood with vonSternberg's unerring sense of visual beauty.



The Cat and the Canary (1927) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

Remade three times in the sound era, this silent version starring Laura LaPlante is considered the definitive rendering.



Underworld (1927) 

84% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

A series of "art" titles fill the screen to establish the mood: "A great city in the dead of night



College (1927) 

88% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

One of Buster's lesser -- but still classic -- silent features.



The Thief of Bagdad (1924) 

96% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

It requires some viewing commitment, but this beautifully assembled showcase for Douglas Fairbanks' acting offers some splendid treats for classic film fans.



A Woman of Paris: A Drama of Fate (1923) 

91% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

The silent film was written, produced and directed by Charles Chaplin, who has a small role as a railroad porter.



The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923) 

95% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

A heart-rending take on the classic book, with a legendary performance by Lon Chaney.



Orphans of the Storm (1921) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

In this film, Henriette brings her blind sister Louise to Paris, in search of a surgeon who might be able to restore her sister's sight.



Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920) 

92% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

In 1920, filmgoers were treated to no fewer than two different film versions of Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.