These are movies that have fewer than 5,000 votes by audience members, but at least 25 votes from critics. These movies are then filtered so that only the ones that have at least 85 percent of critics enjoying the movie are shown.

As you'll notice a lot of the following recommendations are documentaries and art house films. If you'd like to read a list that excludes these genres, check out the filtered great unknown list.

Leave No Trace (2018) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

Leave No Trace takes an effectively low-key approach to a potentially sensationalistic story -- and further benefits from brilliant work by Ben Foster and Thomasin McKenzie.



The Tale (2018) 

98% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

The Tale handles its extraordinarily challenging subject matter with sensitivity, grace, and the power of some standout performances led by a remarkable Laura Dern.



The Sisters Brothers (2018) 

84% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

The Sisters Brothers rides familiar genre trails in occasionally unexpected ways - a satisfying journey further elevated by its well-matched leading men.



The Miseducation of Cameron Post (2018) 

86% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

The Miseducation of Cameron Post tells its timely coming-of-age story with wit, compassion, and an affecting overall generosity of spirit.



Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far on Foot (2018) 

75% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far on Foot avoids inspirational biopic clichés thanks to sensitive work from writer-director Gus Van Sant and the admirable efforts of a well-chosen cast.



McQueen (2018) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

McQueen offers an intimate, well-sourced, and overall moving look at a young life and brilliant career that were tragically cut short.



The Wild Pear Tree (2018) 

87% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

A boundless place of exile where all hopes and dreams merge with despair like the coinciding destinies of fathers and sons



Bad Times at the El Royale (2018) 

72% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Smart, stylish, and packed with solid performances, Bad Times at the El Royale delivers pure popcorn fun with the salty tang of social subtext.



Happy as Lazzaro (2018) 

94% of critics love it, but only 500 people have rated it.

Lazzaro is a naive and optimistic twenty-year-old farmer; Tancredi is instead a young man with a fervid imagination.



Dogman (2018) 

72% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Dogman offers a grim character study set apart by Marcello Fonte's performance and director Matteo Garrone's tight grip on the material.



Blindspotting (2018) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

As timely as it is overall impactful, Blindspotting blends buddy comedy with seething social commentary, and rises on the strength of Daveed Diggs' powerful performance.



Minding the Gap (2018) 

100% of critics love it, but only 300 people have rated it.

Minding the Gap draws on more than a decade of documentary footage to assemble a poignant picture of young American lives that resonates far beyond its onscreen subjects.



Three Identical Strangers (2018) 

95% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

Surreal and surprising, Three Identical Strangers effectively questions the nature of reality and identity.



Won't You Be My Neighbor? (2018) 

98% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

Won't You Be My Neighbor? takes a fittingly patient and honest look at the life and legacy of a television pioneer whose work has enriched generations.



RBG (2018) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

RBG might be preaching to the choir of viewers who admire Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, but it does so effectively.



Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind (2018) 

95% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind offers a poignant -- albeit tantalizingly incomplete -- peek behind the curtain of a brilliant performer's tragically curtailed life and career.



Thunder Road (2018) 

95% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

Written and directed by Jim Cummings, who also stars alongside Nican Robinson, Jocelyn DeBoer, Macon Blair, Bill Wise, Jordan Fox, and Chelsea Edmundson.



The Bleeding Edge (2018) 

100% of critics love it, but only 700 people have rated it.

Weaving emotionally powerful stories of people whose lives have been irrevocably harmed, the film asks: what life-saving technologies may actually be killing us?



Active Measures (2018) 

83% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

In ACTIVE MEASURES, Bryan exposes a 30-year history of covert political warfare devised by Vladmir Putin to disrupt, influence, and ultimately control world events, democratic nations through cyber attacks, propaganda campaigns, and corruption.



Climax (2018) 

89% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Challenging and rewarding in equal measure, Climax captures writer-director Gaspar Noé working near his technically brilliant and visually distinctive peak.



Dealt (2017) 

95% of critics love it, but only 700 people have rated it.

One of the most renowned card magicians of all time, Richard Turner astounds audiences around the world with his legendary sleight of hand.



Unrest (2017) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,100 people have rated it.

Journalist Jennifer Brea documents her struggle with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, also known as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.



The Wife (2017) 

84% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

The Wife relies on the strength of Glenn Close's performance to drive home the power of its story -- and she proves thoroughly, grippingly up to the task.



A Prayer Before Dawn (2017) 

91% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

A Prayer Before Dawn is far from an easy watch, but this harrowing prison odyssey delivers rich rewards -- led by an outstanding central performance from Joe Cole.



78/52: Hitchcock's Shower Scene (2017) 

88% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

78/52: Hitchcock's Shower Scene takes a look at one of modern cinema's most memorable moments, offering insights of value to cineastes and casual viewers alike.



First They Killed My Father (2017) 

88% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

First They Killed My Father tackles its subject matter with grace, skill, and empathy, offering a ground-level look at historic atrocities that resonates beyond its story's borders.



A Bag of Marbles (2017) 

85% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

Patrick Bruel resonates as the Jewish family patriarch Roman, while newcomers Dorian Le Clech and Batyste Fleurial register an almost agonizing vulnerability as hapless innocents trying to outrun the barbarous machinery of war.



Lean on Pete (2017) 

92% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

Lean on Pete avoids mawkish melodrama, offering an empathetic yet clear-eyed portrayal of a young man at a crossroads that confirms Charley Plummer as a major talent.



My Happy Family (2017) 

100% of critics love it, but only 800 people have rated it.

Who upset her?



1945 (2017) 

96% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

1945 sifts through the aftermath of the Holocaust to offer a sober, well-crafted look at a variety of weighty themes.



The Work (2017) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

The Work takes a gut-wrenching look at lives all too often written off as lost causes, persuasively arguing that growth and change can be waiting where we least expect it.



Summer 1993 (2017) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Summer 1993 (Estiu 1993) finds writer-director Carla Simón drawing on personal memories to create a thoughtful drama elevated by outstanding work from its young leads.



Columbus (2017) 

98% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

Wonderfully acted and artfully composed, Columbus balances the clean lines of architecture against the messiness of love, with tenderly moving results.



BPM (Beats Per Minute) (2017) 

98% of critics love it, but only 5,000 people have rated it.

Moving without resorting to melodrama, BPM offers an engrossing look at a pivotal period in history that lingers long after the closing credits roll.



The Silent Child (2017) 

91% of critics love it, but only 700 people have rated it.

When fresh faced social worker, Joanne turns up we see Libby transform.



The Rider (2017) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

The Rider's hard-hitting drama is only made more effective through writer-director Chloé Zhao's use of untrained actors to tell the movie's fact-based tale.



The Farthest (2017) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

Informative, enthusiastic and accessible, The Farthest will inspire even the most grounded of viewers to look up in wonder once in a while.



Cries from Syria (2017) 

100% of critics love it, but only 400 people have rated it.

As peaceful protests were held, the government retaliated with extreme force, resulting in a full-blown civil war.



Chasing Coral (2017) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

Chasing Coral offers a breathtakingly beautiful look at some of the Earth's most incredible natural wonders while delivering a sobering warning about their uncertain future.



City of Ghosts (2017) 

97% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

City of Ghosts takes a hard-hitting, ground-level look at atrocities in a part of the world that may seem foreign to many viewers, but whose impact will be no less devastating.



Last Men in Aleppo (2017) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

Heartbreaking and hopeful, Last Men in Aleppo paints an urgent portrait of war-torn Syria, putting faces on an ongoing and complicated conflict.



Oklahoma City (2017) 

96% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

OKLAHOMA CITY traces the events--including the deadly encounters between American citizens and law enforcement at Ruby Ridge and Waco--that led McVeigh to commit the worst act of domestic terrorism in American history.



Get Me Roger Stone (2017) 

87% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

As informative as it is entertaining, Get Me Roger Stone offers a close-up look at the right-wing gadfly who helped shape the 2016 presidential election.



Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story (2017) 

95% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

Inspiring and tragic, Bombshell is a bittersweet celebration and reclamation of Hedy Lemarr's journey from Hollywood legend to technology genius.



LA 92 (2017) 

91% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Twenty-five years after the verdict in the Rodney King trial sparked several days of protests, violence and looting in Los Angeles, LA 92 immerses viewers in that tumultuous period through stunning and rarely seen archival footage.



A Taxi Driver (2017) 

95% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

A Taxi Driver brings a ground-level perspective and a refreshingly light touch to a fact-based story with sobering implications.



Foxtrot (2017) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Foxtrot uses topical themes to deliver a bruising sociopolitical statement that's equally effective taken simply as an absorbing, well-acted drama.



Negative Space (2017) 

100% of critics love it, but only 600 people have rated it.

Always leaving on business trips, the father connects with Sam by teaching him how to pack a suitcase efficiently.



Jane (2017) 

98% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

Jane honors its subject's legacy with an absorbing, beautifully filmed, and overall enlightening look at her decades of invaluable work.



What Will People Say (2017) 

78% of critics love it, but only 700 people have rated it.

What Will People Say? argues that institutional sexism starts at home -- and the results can be as powerful as they are difficult to watch.



One Cut of the Dead (2017) 

100% of critics love it, but only 600 people have rated it.

A cast of relative unknowns, a brilliantly disguised low budget and an epic, 37-minute opening single take makes Shin'ichiro Ueda's feature debut a bright, breezy and laugh-out-loud hilarious zombie comedy.



David Lynch: The Art Life (2016) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

David Lynch: The Art Life offers a look at the director's life and craft whose unusual approach is in keeping with its subject's singularly strange aesthetic.



Gimme Danger (2016) 

94% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

Its infectious enthusiasm for its subjects - and Iggy Pop's ingratiating presence - more than make up for the effortlessly entertaining Gimme Danger's relative lack of context or depth.



Ethel & Ernest (2016) 

96% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Gentle, poignant, and vividly animated, Ethel & Ernest is a warm character study with an evocative sense of time and place.



Big Fish & Begonia (2016) 

90% of critics love it, but only 1,100 people have rated it.

Big Fish & Begonia's richly rendered blend of animation styles perfectly complements its bighearted, surprisingly complex cautionary fish tale.



The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years (2016) 

95% of critics love it, but only 8,400 people have rated it.

We love them, yeah, yeah, yeah -- and with archival footage like that, you know The Beatles: Eight Days a Week -- The Touring Years can't be bad.



Maudie (2016) 

88% of critics love it, but only 8,500 people have rated it.

Maudie's talented cast -- particularly Sally Hawkins in the title role -- breathe much-needed depth into a story that only skims the surface of a fascinating life and talent.



Betting on Zero (2016) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Ted Braun directed this look at a controversial hedge fund manager who is determined to expose the health food giant Herbalife as a pyramid scheme.



The Eagle Huntress (2016) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

Effectively stirring and bolstered by thrilling visuals, The Eagle Huntress uses its heartwarming message to fill up a feature that might have made for an even more powerful short film.



Life, Animated (2016) 

94% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

Life, Animated offers a heartwarming look at one family's journey, and a fascinating message that's more than enough to outweigh its unanswered questions.



Things to Come (2016) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,800 people have rated it.

A union to cherish between a writer-director and star working at peak power, Things to Come offers quietly profound observations on life, love, and the irrevocable passage of time.



Score: A Film Music Documentary (2016) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

SCORE: A Film Music Documentary offers a long-overdue look at an integral component of cinema whose abbreviated overview of the subject should only leave viewers ready for more.



Kedi (2016) 

98% of critics love it, but only 8,100 people have rated it.

Kedi is a cat fancier's dream, but this thoughtful, beautifully filmed look at Istanbul's street feline population offers absorbing viewing for filmgoers of any purr-suasion.



Endless Poetry (2016) 

92% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

Endless Poetry extends writer-director Alejandro Jodorowsky's singular filmography with another joyously surreal, visually vibrant viewing experience.



Sieranevada (2016) 

91% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Sieranevada targets a narrow viewing demographic, but hits its targets with intelligence, humor, and patient craft.



For the Love of Spock (2016) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

And the timing seemed right, as the 50th anniversary of Star Trek the original series was not that far away.



Gleason (2016) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Gleason stands out among sports-themed documentaries by offering a clear-eyed look at its subject's physical deterioration -- and an intimate portrait of the family affected by his ordeal.



The Young Offenders (2016) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Jock is a legendary bike thief who plays a daily game of cat-and-mouse with the bike-theft-obsessed Garda Sergeant Healy.



Divines (2016) 

82% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

In a ghetto near Paris where drugs and religion reign supreme, Dounia is hungry for her share of power and success.



In This Corner of the World (2016) 

97% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

In This Corner of the World offers a unique ground-level perspective on an oft-dramatized period in history, further distinguished by beautiful hand-drawn animation.



The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Mäki (2016) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Mäki sidesteps sports biopic clichés with a beautifully filmed, well-acted look at the balance between career fulfillment and personal happiness.



Into the Inferno (2016) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Into the Inferno finds director Werner Herzog observing some of the most beautiful -- and terrifying -- wonders of the natural world with his signature blend of curiosity and insight.



The Age of Shadows (2016) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

The Age of Shadows justifies its imposing length with a richly detailed period drama whose sprawling size is matched by strong acting, impressive craft, and narrative depth.



Justin Timberlake + the Tennessee Kids (2016) 

100% of critics love it, but only 800 people have rated it.

), the Netflix Original Film showcases the entertainer's final date of his 20/20 Experience World Tour at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas.



Frantz (2016) 

90% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

Frantz finds writer-director François Ozon thoughtfully probing the aftermath of World War I through the memories and relationships of loved ones left behind.



Tower (2016) 

98% of critics love it, but only 4,500 people have rated it.

Tower probes into a painful chapter of American history with sensitivity and grace -- and revisits its events from a valuable new perspective.



Oasis: Supersonic (2016) 

82% of critics love it, but only 5,000 people have rated it.

Oasis: Supersonic foregoes a comprehensive approach to its multi-platinum subjects in favor of an appreciative -- and stirring -- look at their heady early years.



Dawson City: Frozen Time (2016) 

100% of critics love it, but only 600 people have rated it.

Dawson City: Frozen Time takes a patient look at the past through long-lost film footage that reveals much more than glimpses at life through the camera's lens.



Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World (2016) 

93% of critics love it, but only 7,900 people have rated it.

Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World finds Werner Herzog bringing his distinctive documentarian gifts to bear on a timely topic with typically thought-provoking results.



Jim: The James Foley Story (2016) 

90% of critics love it, but only 700 people have rated it.

A look at the life of journalist James Foley, who was kidnapped in Syria in 2012 and became the first American citizen to be killed by the terrorist group ISIS.



Weiner (2016) 

96% of critics love it, but only 8,200 people have rated it.

Weiner uses sharp insight and untrammeled access to offer a portrait of a political and personal collapse that's as queasy as it is undeniably compelling.



Sami Blood (2016) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

She must soon choose between new academic opportunities or staying true to her cultural identity, all while weathering the storms of adolescence.



Cameraperson (2016) 

99% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

Fresh and inventive yet immediately accessible, Cameraperson distills its subject's life and career into an experience that should prove immediately absorbing even for those unfamiliar with her work.



Fastball (2016) 

89% of critics love it, but only 900 people have rated it.

Hank Aaron and Derek Jeter, with Kevin Costner narrating, lead a cast of baseball legends & scientists who explore the magic within the 396 milliseconds it takes a fastball to reach home plate, and decipher who threw the fastest pitch ever.



Zero Days (2016) 

91% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

Factors beyond Gibney's control prevent Zero Days from offering a comprehensive look at its subject, but the partial picture that emerges remains as frightening as it is impossible to ignore.



Tickling Giants (2016) 

100% of critics love it, but only 700 people have rated it.

Tickling Giants offers a powerful demonstration of how satire can influence government policy -- and a sobering warning regarding the double-edged effects of regime change.



Raman Raghav 2.0 (2016) 

81% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

His strange obsession with Raghavan, a young cop, keeps growing as he closely follows him without his knowledge and often creates situations where both of them come face-to-face.



Sour Grapes (2016) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

That day, he says, he took the first plane to New York, and thus begun his crusade.



One More Time with Feeling (2016) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

A unique one night only cinema event directed by Andrew Dominik (Chopper, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, Killing Them Softly), One More Time With Feeling will be the first ever opportunity anyone will have to hear Skeleton Tree, the sixteenth studio album from Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds.



Glory (2016) 

93% of critics love it, but only 700 people have rated it.

Tsanko Petrov, a railroad worker, finds millions of leva on the train tracks.



The Ivory Game (2016) 

80% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

Hard-hitting and ambitious to a fault, The Ivory Game serves as a fittingly urgent call to action against a looming threat against vulnerable wildlife and a fragile ecosystem.



Abacus: Small Enough to Jail (2016) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Abacus: Small Enough to Jail transcends its less-than-dramatic trappings to present a gripping real-life legal thriller with far-reaching implications.



In Between (2016) 

98% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

In Between takes a light yet nuanced approach to dramatizing complex, timely themes, further enriched by outstanding cinematography and powerful performances.



Tab Hunter Confidential (2015) 

87% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

Tab Hunter Confidential offers clear-eyed perspective on a less-examined chapter from Hollywood's past -- and an enjoyable look at the life of a retired former heartthrob.



Racing Extinction (2015) 

81% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

The Oceanic Preservation Society, the group behind the Academy Award (R) winning film THE COVE, is back for "6".



De Palma (2015) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

De Palma may not make believers out of the director's detractors, but they'll likely share longtime fans' fascination with his career's worth of entertaining stories.



(Dis)Honesty: The Truth About Lies (2015) 

88% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

From scandalous headlines to little white lies, (Dis)Honesty - The Truth About Lies explores the complex impact dishonesty has on our lives and everyday society.



Twinsters (2015) 

91% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

The film explores the ideas of family, adoption, nature vs. nurture and the power of social media.



Parched (2015) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

Parched world premiered at the 2015 Toronto International Film Festival.



Requiem for the American Dream (2015) 

92% of critics love it, but only 5,200 people have rated it.

In a series of interviews spanning four years, leftist social critic Noam Chomsky discusses how the concentration of wealth and power among a small elite has polarized American society and brought about the decline of the middle class.



All Things Must Pass: The Rise and Fall of Tower Records (2015) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

In 1999, Tower Records made $1 billion.



April and the Extraordinary World (2015) 

96% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Bursting with a colorful imagination befitting its promise-packed title, April and the Extraordinary World offers spectacular delights for animation fans willing to venture off the beaten path.



The Witness (2015) 

91% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

The Witness can't hope to truly untangle the true crime case at its center, but offers a series of fascinating -- and troubling -- insights in the attempt.



Holding the Man (2015) 

79% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

Heart-wrenching performances center Holding the Man, an achingly beautiful portrayal of love and death that may be too real for some.



Last Cab to Darwin (2015) 

91% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

In LAST CAB TO DARWIN, Rex (Michael Caton), a cab driver in the mining town Broken Hill, has spent his life avoiding getting close to people - even his best friend and occasional lover Polly (Ningali Lawford-Wolf), who lives across the road.



Janis: Little Girl Blue (2015) 

93% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

Respectful without veering into hagiography and inquisitive without being intrusive, Janis: Little Girl Blue offers an insightful glimpse into the life of a rock 'n' roll legend.



Sherpa (2015) 

97% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

A brawl on Everest?



Hitchcock/Truffaut (2015) 

95% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

Essential viewing for cineastes while still offering rich rewards for neophytes, Hitchcock/Truffaut offers an affectionate -- and well-crafted -- tribute to a legend.



Truman (2015) 

98% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Well-written, well-acted, and patiently crafted, Truman takes an affecting look at a long friendship separated by distance but undimmed by time.



Our Little Sister (2015) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Our Little Sister uses the story of one fractured family to offer universal -- and deeply moving -- observations on the human condition.



Call Me Lucky (2015) 

84% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

Barry Crimmins was a volatile but brilliant bar comic who became an honored peace activist and influential political satirist.



Ixcanul (2015) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

Ixcanul opens a window into a little-seen corner of the world -- and finds universal truths about the human condition that should resonate with patient viewers.



How to Change the World (2015) 

95% of critics love it, but only 600 people have rated it.

In 1971 a brave group of young activists set sail from Vancouver in an old fishing boat.



Listen to Me Marlon (2015) 

95% of critics love it, but only 4,500 people have rated it.

Listen to Me Marlon offers a fascinating look at the inner life of a Hollywood icon, told in his own words.



The Hunting Ground (2015) 

93% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

The Hunting Ground isn't director Kirby Dick's strongest work as a filmmaker, but the movie's powerful message more than trumps any technical weaknesses.



The People vs. Fritz Bauer (2015) 

86% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

Attorney General Fritz Bauer receives crucial evidence on the whereabouts of SS-Obersturmbannfuhrer Adolf Eichmann.



Krisha (2015) 

97% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

Raw, bracingly honest, and refreshingly unconventional, Krisha wrings fresh -- and occasionally uncomfortable -- truths from a seemingly familiar premise.



What Happened, Miss Simone? (2015) 

88% of critics love it, but only 5,600 people have rated it.

What Happened, Miss Simone? is a compelling -- albeit necessarily incomplete -- overview of its complex subject's singular artistic legacy and fascinating life.



James White (2015) 

91% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

Led by powerfully complementary performances from Christopher Abbott and Cynthia Nixon, James White offers an affecting calling card for debuting writer-director Josh Mond.



Sweet Bean (2015) 

82% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

Sweet Bean's deliberate pace demands patience, but the satisfying simplicity of its story -- and Kirin Kiki's absorbing performance -- yield an array of riches well worth the wait.



Aferim! (2015) 

97% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

Smart, visually arresting, and scathingly funny, Aferim! depicts a world that many American filmgoers have never seen -- but will still, in many respects, find utterly familiar.



Marguerite (2015) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Touching, funny, and thoughtful, Marguerite honors its real-life inspiration with a well-acted and ultimately inspirational look at the nature of art and the value of a dream.



Ingrid Bergman: In Her Own Words (2015) 

98% of critics love it, but only 1,100 people have rated it.

Ingrid Bergman in Her Own Words distills its subject's legendary charm while offering viewers a new personal perspective on the life of one of Hollywood's more celebrated stars.



Right Now, Wrong Then (2015) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

Right Now, Wrong Then offers diverging perspectives on a chance meeting -- and thought-provoking observations on human interactions in general.



Winter on Fire: Ukraine's Fight for Freedom (2015) 

87% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

What started as peaceful student demonstrations supporting European integration morphed into a full-fledged violent revolution calling for the resignation of the nation's president.



The Tribe (2014) 

87% of critics love it, but only 7,100 people have rated it.

A bleak, haunting drama whose wordless dialogue speaks volumes, The Tribe is a bold, innovative take on silent films for a contemporary audience.



Glen Campbell: I'll Be Me (2014) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

The heartrendingly honest Glen Campbell: I'll Be Me offers a window into Alzheimer's that should prove powerful viewing for Campbell fans and novices alike.



Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films (2014) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films pays tribute to the titular studio with an affectionate look back that's arguably more entertaining than much of Cannon's own B-movie product.



The Dark Horse (2014) 

96% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

Led by an outstanding performance from Cliff Curtis, The Dark Horse tackles complex themes with a richly layered, unpredictable, and deeply affecting story.



An Honest Liar (2014) 

97% of critics love it, but only 4,900 people have rated it.

A thoughtful and surprisingly layered documentary enlivened by its subject, An Honest Liar serves as a well-deserved tribute to a fascinating life.



The Green Prince (2014) 

78% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

The Green Prince doesn't answer all the questions it raises, but it's still timely, gripping -- and ultimately uplifting -- viewing.



Meet the Patels (2014) 

86% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

Meet the Patels works on multiple levels, offering an affably entertaining documentary about one man looking for love while posing thoughtful questions about cultural assimilation and modern romance.



Next Goal Wins (2014) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

AGAINST THIS BACKDROP OF SERIAL UNDERACHIEVEMENT, THE TEAM FACE THE DAUNTING PROSPECT OF A QUALIFICATION CAMPAIGN FOR THE UPCOMING 2014 WORLD CUP IN BRAZIL.



Rich Hill (2014) 

84% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

As compassionate as it is infuriating, Rich Hill offers a sobering glimpse of American poverty.



Matt Shepard Is a Friend of Mine (2014) 

100% of critics love it, but only 900 people have rated it.

(C) Run Rabbit Run Media



Lilting (2014) 

83% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

Skillfully weaving multiple delicate tonal strands into a quietly affecting whole, Lilting serves as a thoroughly compelling calling card for writer-director Hong Khaou.



Alive Inside (2014) 

73% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

It's somewhat clumsily expressed, but Alive Inside offers such an uplifting message that it's ultimately hard to resist.



Keep on Keepin' On (2014) 

97% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Offering keen observations and infectious warmth, Keep On Keepin' On is a joy for jazz buffs and novices alike.



20,000 Days on Earth (2014) 

95% of critics love it, but only 7,100 people have rated it.

Revealing yet respectful, 20,000 Days on Earth is essential viewing for any Nick Cave fan.



Margarita with a Straw (2014) 

82% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Undeterred by cerebral palsy, she embarks on a journey of sexual discovery.



The Connection (2014) 

76% of critics love it, but only 5,200 people have rated it.

The Connection doesn't do itself any favors by forcing comparisons to The French Connection, but it's a reasonably entertaining thriller in its own right.



Far from Men (2014) 

83% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

Pursued by horsemen seeking summary justice and vengeful settlers, the two men decide to confront the unknown.



All This Mayhem (2014) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Brothers Tas and Ben Pappas, two boys from Melbourne who took the skateboarding world by storm, defeated Tony Hawk and crowned International World Champions within a year.



Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem (2014) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,000 people have rated it.

On paper, GETT: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem might seem less than thrilling, but on the screen, it delivers two hours of nonstop, tightly wound, brilliantly acted drama.



Diplomacy (2014) 

93% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

For filmgoers who value character development and smart dialogue over plot, Diplomacy yields rich, powerfully acted rewards.



Marie's Story (2014) 

69% of critics love it, but only 800 people have rated it.

Based on true events, Marie's Story recounts the courageous journey of a young nun and the lives she would change forever, confronting failures and discouragement with joyous faith and love.



Theeb (2014) 

97% of critics love it, but only 7,000 people have rated it.

Led by an outstanding performance from Jacir Eid Al-Hwietat in the title role, Theeb is a startlingly assured first effort from director/co-writer Naji Abu Nowar.



The Last Man on the Moon (2014) 

93% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

The Last Man on the Moon takes a justifiably reverent look at a largely unexplored chapter in the history of American space exploration -- and a side of astronaut's lives that's rarely considered.



The Overnighters (2014) 

98% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

Hard-hitting, absorbing, and painfully relevant, The Overnighters offers an urgent and compassionate picture of life in 21st century America.



Red Army (2014) 

93% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

Fun and fascinating, Red Army delivers absorbing documentary drama for hockey fans and sports novices alike.



Last Days in Vietnam (2014) 

95% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

As gripping as it is inspiring, Last Days in Vietnam offers a surprisingly fresh -- and heart-wrenching -- perspective on the end of the Vietnam War.



She's Beautiful When She's Angry (2014) 

94% of critics love it, but only 900 people have rated it.

SHE'S BEAUTIFUL takes us from the founding of NOW, when ladies wore hats and gloves, to the emergence of more radical factions of women's liberation; from intellectuals like Kate Millett to the street theatrics of WITCH (Women's International Conspiracy from Hell!).



The Battered Bastards of Baseball (2014) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

What did Deputy Clem from Bonanza know about baseball?



Virunga (2014) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,100 people have rated it.

Virunga offers a heart-rending glimpse of natural wonders vulnerable to the atrocities of greed -- and the people devoting their lives to defending them.



Night Will Fall (2014) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Documentary that includes archive footage of a documentary made by Alfred Hitchcock and Sidney Bernstein about concentration camps.



Stations of the Cross (2014) 

91% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

A drama of thought-provoking depth as well as a showcase for newcomer Lea van Acken, Stations of the Cross hits hard and leaves a lingering impact.



Güeros (2014) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

A striking effort that synthesizes disparate influences with inventive flair, Güeros marks a bold step forward for modern Mexican cinema.



The Look of Silence (2014) 

96% of critics love it, but only 7,400 people have rated it.

The Look of Silence delivers a less shocking -- yet just as terribly compelling -- companion piece to Joshua Oppenheimer's The Act of Killing.



Dior and I (2014) 

83% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

Dior and I will obviously appeal to fashion fans, but this beautifully tailored documentary may draw in even the least sartorially inclined.



Zero Motivation (2014) 

86% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

Darkly funny and understatedly absurd, Zero Motivation is a refreshing addition to the canon of irreverent war comedies -- and an intriguing calling card for writer-director Talya Lavie.



Kilo Two Bravo (2014) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

Kilo Two Bravo honors its fact-based story with an almost unbearably tense drama that captures the horrors -- and the human cost -- of modern warfare.



Merchants of Doubt (2014) 

83% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

Merchants of Doubt is a thought-provoking documentary assembled with energy and style, even if it doesn't dig as deep as it could.



A Hard Day (2014) 

79% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Making matters worse, a witness steps forward, a detective named Park.



Court (2014) 

98% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

Court takes a penetrating, timely look at issues facing Indian society while serving as an excellent calling card for debuting writer-director Chaitanya Tamhane.



Labyrinth of Lies (2014) 

82% of critics love it, but only 5,500 people have rated it.

Labyrinth of Lies artfully blends fact with well-intentioned fiction to offer a thought-provoking look at how the lessons of history can be easily lost or forgotten.



The Seven Five (2014) 

85% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

Meet the dirtiest cop in New York City history.



I Am Divine (2013) 

96% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

With warmth and affection, I Am Divine offers an engaging portrait of the complex personality behind a trailblazing cinematic figure.



The Armstrong Lie (2013) 

82% of critics love it, but only 6,200 people have rated it.

Smartly constructed and scathingly sharp, The Armstrong Lie presents an effective indictment of its unscrupulous subject -- as well as the sports culture that spawned him.



Gore Vidal: The United States of Amnesia (2013) 

80% of critics love it, but only 800 people have rated it.

Gore Vidal's professional life spans more than 50 years of American politics and letters.



The Punk Singer (2013) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

It verges on hagiography, but given the deeply compelling nature of its subject's story, The Punk Singer can be forgiven its lack of objectivity.



Metro Manila (2013) 

93% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

Infusing thriller tropes with a searing glimpse of modern-day corruption, Metro Manila is just as gripping as any action blockbuster -- and twice as thought-provoking.



Home from Home: Chronicle of a Vision (2013) 

84% of critics love it, but only 600 people have rated it.

Spectacular landscapes and an ultra-high definition shooting format elevate Edgar Reitz's Home Away From Home from an unforgettable story to a breathtaking cinematic experience.



Terms and Conditions May Apply (2013) 

85% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

Admit it: you don't really read the endless terms and conditions connected to every website you visit, phone call you make or app you download.



The Inevitable Defeat of Mister & Pete (2013) 

89% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

The Inevitable Defeat of Mister & Pete uses its compelling streetwise setting -- and powerful performances from its young leads -- to offer a refreshing twist on the coming-of-age formula.



Let the Fire Burn (2013) 

97% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Smartly edited and heartbreakingly compelling, Let the Fire Burn uses archival footage to uncover a troubling -- and still deeply resonant -- chapter in American history.



The Stone Roses: Made of Stone (2013) 

75% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

In 2012, a resurrection no one thought possible took place when legendary band, The Stone Roses reformed after 16 years.



The Rocket (2013) 

96% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

A feel-good success crafted with care, Kim Mordaunt's story of two young kids in Laos is a heartfelt audience pleaser while remaining sensitive toward its subjects.



Child's Pose (2013) 

91% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

It isn't necessarily an easy watch, but thanks to Netzer's interesting direction and a riveting performance from Gheorghiu, Child's Pose is rewarding.



Inequality for All (2013) 

90% of critics love it, but only 7,400 people have rated it.

While it arrives in a glut of similarly themed documentaries, Inequality for All distinguishes itself with a compelling presentation of an important message, as well as much-needed splashes of wit.



Blood Brother (2013) 

72% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

Every day he encounters the bitter reality of HIV infection.



The Dance of Reality (2013) 

93% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

This long-overdue return from Alejandro Jodorowsky finds him just as overflowing with imagination -- and heart -- as fans have come to expect.



Cutie and the Boxer (2013) 

94% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

A beautifully-made documentary that explores the challenges and richness of both marriage and art through the lens of a fascinating and complex couple.



We Are the Best! (2013) 

96% of critics love it, but only 7,500 people have rated it.

Sweet, empathetic, and shot through with a palpable joy, We Are the Best! offers a tender tribute to the bittersweet tumult of adolescence.



The Unknown Known (2013) 

81% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

Viewers hoping to see Donald Rumsfeld admit making mistakes in public office (or hoping Errol Morris will force him to give straight answers) may find The Unknown Known frustrating -- but no less fascinating.



Why Don't You Play in Hell? (2013) 

79% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

Deliriously manic and gleefully tasteless, Why Don't You Play in Hell? delivers infectious genre fun.



Human Capital (2013) 

81% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

Part character study, part socioeconomic fable, Human Capital offers trenchant commentary as well as absorbing drama.



Muscle Shoals (2013) 

96% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Essential for soul fans and entertaining for novices, Muscle Shoals offers a compelling, warts-and-all glimpse at one of the most fascinating stories in modern American music.



The Crash Reel (2013) 

95% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

Smart, compassionate, and moving, The Crash Reel uses the familiar sport-doc formula to subvert expectations and ask challenging questions about ambition and achievement.



Narco Cultura (2013) 

88% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Disturbing, thought-provoking, and timely, Narco Cultura sheds some crucial light on an important -- and underserved -- subject.



Dirty Wars (2013) 

84% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

Some viewers may find fault with director Rick Rowley's filmmaking methods, but they aren't distracting enough to keep Dirty Wars from serving as a terribly compelling argument against elements of American foreign policy.



Maidentrip (2013) 

81% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

14-year-old Laura Dekker sets out-camera in hand-on a two-year voyage in pursuit of her dream to be the youngest person ever to sail around the world alone.



Mistaken for Strangers (2013) 

91% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

A suitably complicated look at fraternal bonds, Mistaken for Strangers offers more depth and insight than the usual tour documentary.



A Touch of Sin (2013) 

93% of critics love it, but only 6,200 people have rated it.

Its screenplay isn't as graceful as the choreography of its action sequences, but A Touch of Sin offers enough stylishly satisfying violence to muscle past its rough spots.



Norte, the End of History (2013) 

91% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

Its four-hour length is undeniably imposing, but Norte, the End of History rewards patient viewers with an absorbing, visually expansive viewing experience.



The Missing Picture (2013) 

98% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

Thrillingly unorthodox and emotionally searing without being didactic, The Missing Picture is a uniquely poignant documentary -- and so much more.



A Wolf at the Door (2013) 

84% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Inspired by real events, Brazilian filmmaker Fernando Coimbra's debut feature captures the heightened anxiety of every parent's worst nightmare, casting a light upon the cruelties of which humans are capable.



Living Is Easy with Eyes Closed (2013) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

This unlikely trio form a bond and decide to follow their dreams in hopes of finding their freedom.



Ilo Ilo (2013) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

Quietly compassionate and rich in detail, Ilo Ilo is a strikingly mature debut from writer-director Anthony Chen.



Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon (2013) 

77% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

Its unabashedly positive tone may strike some viewers as disingenuous, but even if Supermensch doesn't tell the whole story, it's an undeniably entertaining one.



Tim's Vermeer (2013) 

89% of critics love it, but only 7,800 people have rated it.

Entertaining and profound in equal measure, Tim's Vermeer uses its seemingly esoteric subject to pose fascinating questions about art and obsession.



The Return to Homs (2013) 

92% of critics love it, but only 500 people have rated it.

When revolution breaks out the charismatic young man becomes an iconic protest leader and singer.



The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness (2013) 

91% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

About Hayao Miyazaki's life and Studio Ghibli.



Apur Panchali (2013) 

95% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

Jafar Panahi's Taxi offers another round of trenchant societal commentary from a director whose entire filmography stands as a daring act of dissent.



The Attack (2012) 

86% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

Tense and suspenseful while remaining smart and understated, The Attack honors its complex subject with an intelligent script and captivating performances.



How to Make Money Selling Drugs (2012) 

76% of critics love it, but only 7,100 people have rated it.

A shockingly candid examination of how a street dealer can rise to cartel lord with relative ease, How to Make Money Selling Drugs is an insider's guide to the violent but extremely lucrative drug industry.



Casting By (2012) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,100 people have rated it.

"Outstanding" - Leonard Maltin; Combining over 240 interviews, extensive archival footage, animated stills & documents with a moving original score, Director Tom Donahue has meticulously crafted the untold tale of the Hollywood casting director.



The Other Dream Team (2012) 

87% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

Led by the unique skills of Sarunas Marciulionis and Arvydas Sabonis, the 1992 Lithuanian Olympic basketball team helped their country break free from the shackles of Communism.



The Patience Stone (2012) 

86% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

It may prove frustratingly slow for some viewers, but more contemplative filmgoers will find themselves rewarded by The Patience Stone's quietly fierce storytelling, as well as a searing starring turn from Golshifteh Farahani.



Hannah Arendt (2012) 

88% of critics love it, but only 6,200 people have rated it.

Led by a powerful performance from Barbara Sukowa, Hannah Arendt does a commendable job of dramatizing the life of a complex public figure.



War Witch (2012) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

War Witch is a mature, intense drama that embraces the bruatlity of its subject and invites the audience to sympathize with its protagonist's nightmarish circumstances.



Like Someone in Love (2012) 

82% of critics love it, but only 6,200 people have rated it.

In his second film outside his native Iran, director Abbas Kiarostami maintains the mysterious, reflective mood of previous triumphs.



Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry (2012) 

97% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

From 2008 to 2010, Beijing-based journalist and filmmaker Alison Klayman gained unprecedented access to Ai Weiwei.



Good Vibrations (2012) 

94% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

Directors Lisa Barros D'Sa and Glenn Leyburn team to tell the true story of Terri Hooley, the rebellious Belfast music lover who launched his own record label, dubbed "Good Vibrations," in the 1970s, and quickly emerged as a key figure in the Irish capitol's thriving underground punk scene.



Beware of Mr. Baker (2012) 

98% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Free of the hagiographic overtones that dog many documentary profiles, Beware of Mr. Baker presents a clear-eyed, thoroughly gripping look at one of rock's greatest -- and most personally problematic -- musicians.



Beauty Is Embarrassing (2012) 

90% of critics love it, but only 800 people have rated it.

The film chronicles the vaulted highs and the crushing lows of a commercial artist struggling to find peace and balance between his work and his art.



Sister (2012) 

95% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Simon (Kacey Mottet Klein) lives with his older sister (Lea Seydoux) in a housing complex below a luxury Swiss ski resort.



Something from Nothing: The Art of Rap (2012) 

85% of critics love it, but only 4,900 people have rated it.

Ice-T takes us on an intimate journey into the heart and soul of hip-hop with the legends of rap music.



A Band Called Death (2012) 

93% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

A Band Called Death is not only a fascinating portrait of a pioneering rock group, but also a tribute to family ties and perseverance in the face of hardship.



Any Day Now (2012) 

79% of critics love it, but only 5,500 people have rated it.

However, when their unconventional living arrangement is discovered by the authorities, Rudy and Paul must fight a biased legal system to adopt the child they have come to love as their own.



The Other Son (2012) 

80% of critics love it, but only 5,100 people have rated it.

"The Other Son" is the moving and provocative tale of two young men -- one Israeli, the other Palestinian -- who discover they were accidentally switched at birth, and the complex repercussions facing them and their respective families.



Marina Abramovic: The Artist Is Present (2012) 

95% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

Seductive, fearless, and outrageous, Marina Abramovic has been redefining what art is for nearly forty years.



Still Mine (2012) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

James Cromwell and Geneviève Bujold are outstanding in this tender, affecting, insightful drama about the bonds and sacrifices of marriage.



Mea Maxima Culpa: Silence in the House of God (2012) 

97% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

In MEA MAXIMA CULPA: SILENCE IN THE HOUSE OF GOD, Oscar (R)-winning filmmaker Alex Gibney examines the abuse of power in the Catholic Church through the story of four courageous deaf men, who in the first known case of public protest, set out to expose the priest who abused them.



Jason Becker: Not Dead Yet (2012) 

82% of critics love it, but only 700 people have rated it.

When doctors diagnosed 19-year-old rock star Jason Becker with Lou Gehrig's Disease, they said he would never make music again and that he wouldn't live to see his 25th birthday.



How to Survive a Plague (2012) 

98% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

Angry, powerful, and stirring, How to Survive a Plague is a brilliantly constructed documentary about the activists who pushed for action to combat the AIDS epidemic.



Shut Up and Play the Hits (2012) 

84% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

On April 2nd, 2011, LCD Soundsystem played its final show at Madison Square Garden.



The House I Live In (2012) 

93% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

Why We Fight director Eugene Jarecki shifts his focus from the military industrial complex to the War on Drugs in this documentary exploring the risks that prohibition poses to freedom, and the tragedy of addicts being treated as criminals.



West of Memphis (2012) 

95% of critics love it, but only 8,800 people have rated it.

Both a sobering look at a true crime story and a scathing indictment of the American justice system, West of Memphis is a real-life horror story told with fury and compassion.



The Pervert's Guide to Ideology (2012) 

92% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

Cultural theorist superstar Slavoj iek re-teams with director Sophie Fiennes (The Pervert's Guide to Cinema) for another wildly entertaining romp through the crossroads of cinema and philosophy.



Tabu (2012) 

87% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

Acclaimed director Miguel Gomes returns with a sumptuous, eccentric two-part tale centered on Aurora, shown first as an impulsive, cantankerous elderly woman in present-day Lisbon.



Drug War (2012) 

94% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

A taut, solidly constructed action thriller with uncommon intelligence, Drug War delivers exhilarating set pieces without skimping on sophisticated filmmaking.



Caesar Must Die (2012) 

91% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

Winner of the Golden Bear at the Berlinale, Paolo and Vittorio Taviani's Caesar Must Die deftly melds narrative and documentary in a transcendently powerful drama-within-a-drama.



Neighboring Sounds (2012) 

91% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

A history of violence and oppression threatens to engulf the residents of an affluent seaside community in Neighboring Sounds, a thrilling debut from filmmaker Kleber Mendonca Filho.



The History of Future Folk (2012) 

94% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

High on quirky smarts and low on splashy special effects, The History of Future Folk is an unusual -- and unusually fun -- slice of sci-fi.



More Than Honey (2012) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

MORE THAN HONEY, a new documentary by the Swiss filmmaker Marcus Imhoof, is looking into the fascinating world of bees, showing small family beekeepers (including the beekeeper of ERSTE Foundation beehive, Heidrun Singer) and industrialized honey farms.



Out in the Dark (2012) 

75% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

One fateful night in Tel Aviv, he meets Roy (Aloni), an Israeli lawyer, and the two fall in love.



Liv & Ingmar (2012) 

92% of critics love it, but only 800 people have rated it.

This film is a love story - encompassing the 42-years and 12-films long relationship between legendary actress Liv Ullmann and master filmmaker Ingmar Bergman.



7 Boxes (2012) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

Crossing the eight blocks of the market seemed easy but things get complicated along the way.



McCullin (2012) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,100 people have rated it.

The made-for-cinema documentary shows how Don McCullin created some of the latter twentieth-century's most iconic images of man's inhumanity to man.



Everything or Nothing (2012) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

Everything or Nothing takes advantage of archival access to offer a look at the making of the Bond franchise that's just as gripping as the best installments in the series.



Crossfire Hurricane (2012) 

88% of critics love it, but only 1,100 people have rated it.

This history of the Rolling Stones features archival footage of the British rock-and-roll giant's 1960s performances, interviews with the group's members, and clips of other documentaries about the band, including Gimme Shelter (1970) and Shine a Light (2008).



The Central Park Five (2012) 

93% of critics love it, but only 6,900 people have rated it.

With THE CENTRAL PARK FIVE, this story of injustice finally gets the telling it deserves.



It's Such a Beautiful Day (2012) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,900 people have rated it.

A collection of three shorts by Don Hertzfeldt, It's Such a Beautiful Day is an impossibly dense and affecting piece of animated art.



Elena (2012) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

Winner of Cannes' Un Certain Regard Special Jury Prize, Elena is a gripping, modern twist on the classic noir thriller.



George Harrison: Living in the Material World (2011) 

86% of critics love it, but only 5,200 people have rated it.

HBO and Martin Scorsese present GEORGE HARRISON: LIVING IN THE MATERIAL WORLD.



Corman's World: Exploits of a Hollywood Rebel (2011) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

But stalking the depths of its post-nuclear bliss, mass paranoia became fuel for Joseph McCarthy's brand of Red Scare terror propaganda.



Pariah (2011) 

93% of critics love it, but only 6,900 people have rated it.

Pulsing with authenticity and led by a stirring lead performance from Adepero Oduye, Pariah is a powerful coming out/coming-of-age film that signals the arrival of a fresh new talent in writer/director Dee Rees.



The Interrupters (2011) 

98% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

Impeccably crafted and edited, The Interrupters is a tough and honest documentary about street violence that truly has the power to inspire change.



Whores' Glory (2011) 

85% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

Whores' Glory, the third film in Michael Glawogger's globalization trilogy (following Megacities, Workingman's Death), is an explicit and unflinching expose of global prostitution.



The Rabbi's Cat (2011) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

Rich with the colors, textures, flavors and music of Mediterranean Africa, the film embarks on a cross continent adventure from the tiled terraces, fountains, quays and cafes of colonial Algiers to Maghrebi tent camps, dusty trading outposts, and deep blue Saharan nights in search of a lost Ethiopian city.



Surviving Progress (2011) 

75% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

But what if progress is actually spiraling us downwards, towards collapse?



The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 (2011) 

91% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 mobilizes a treasure trove of 16mm material shot by Swedish journalists who came to the US drawn by stories of urban unrest and revolution.



Beats, Rhymes & Life: The Travels of A Tribe Called Quest (2011) 

89% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

This documentary focuses less on the music and more on the personality clashes and in-group tensions to great, compelling effect.



North Sea Texas (2011) 

81% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

Strong direction and delicate performances save Noordzee, Texas from its narrative cliches.



Chicken with Plums (2011) 

74% of critics love it, but only 5,000 people have rated it.

Whimsical and melancholy, Chicken with Plums is visually striking and dreamily compelling despite its occasional narrative missteps.



This Is Not a Film (2011) 

96% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

Through simple means and filming, This is Not a Film presents a vital political statement and a snapshot of life in Iran as enemy of the state.



The Last Lions (2011) 

86% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

A resilient lioness in Botswana's Okavango Delta embarks on an epic journey of survival in this nature documentary from National Geographic and award-winning filmmakers Dereck and Beverly Joubert.



TT3D: Closer to the Edge (2011) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

By vividly recounting the TT's legendary rivalries and the Isle of Man's unique road racing history, this 3D feature documentary will discover why modern TT riders still risk their lives to win the world's most dangerous race.



Last Days Here (2011) 

85% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Various acts of self-destruction, multiple band break-ups, and botched record deals have condemned his music to obscurity.



Buck (2011) 

89% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

So says Buck Brannaman, a true American cowboy and sage on horseback who travels the country for nine grueling months a year helping horses with people problems.



Bobby Fischer Against the World (2011) 

86% of critics love it, but only 4,000 people have rated it.

His trajectory propelled him from child prodigy to US champion at age 15 and world champion at 29.



If a Tree Falls: A Story of the Earth Liberation Front (2011) 

87% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Filmmaker Marshall Curry explores the inner workings of the Earth Liberation Front, a revolutionary movement devoted to crippling facilities involved in deforestation, while simultaneously offering a profile of Oregon ELF member Daniel McGowan, who was brought up on terrorism charges for his involvement with the radical group.



We Were Here (2011) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

We Were Here revisits the crises facing the gay community in the early 1980s -- and offers a powerful tribute to the inspiring resolve shown at a time of turmoil.



The Snows of Kilimanjaro (2011) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

Despite losing his job, Michel lives happily with Marie-Claire.



Undefeated (2011) 

96% of critics love it, but only 6,000 people have rated it.

It covers familiar sports documentary territory, but Undefeated proves there are still powerful stories to be told on the high school gridiron.



Declaration of War (2011) 

86% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

The opening night film at this year's Critics Week at the Cannes Film Festival, this exuberant and deeply moving film follows a new couple, Romeo (Jeremie Elkaim) and Juliette (Valerie Donzelli), who must face the ultimate test when they discover their new born child is very ill.



You've Been Trumped (2011) 

84% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

In this David and Goliath tale for the 21st Century, a group of proud Scottish homeowners take on Donald Trump, as the tycoon prepares to destroy one of Britain's last stretches of coastal wilderness by building a luxury golf resort.



A Simple Life (2011) 

92% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

One day Roger comes home from work to find that Ah Tao has suffered a stroke.



Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory (2011) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

This final version chronicles the last years in prison and eventual release of the three men accused of brutally murdering three boys in West Memphis, Arkansas in 1993.



The Ambassador (2011) 

75% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

As he immerses himself in the life-threatening underworld of nefarious bureaucrats, Brugger encounters blood diamond smuggling, bribery, and even murder -- while somehow managing to crack amazing razor-sharp barbs at every step along the way.



Diana Vreeland: The Eye Has to Travel (2011) 

94% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

An affectionate portrait created with visual flair, Diana Vreeland is entertaining, informative, and stylish, due in large part to its charismatic subject.



Five Broken Cameras (2011) 

95% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

An extraordinary work of both cinematic and political activism, 5 Broken Cameras is a deeply personal, first-hand account of non-violent resistance in Bil'in, a West Bank village threatened by encroaching Israeli settlements.



Chico & Rita (2010) 

86% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

With an original soundtrack by legendary Cuban pianist and five-time Grammy-winning composer Bebo Valdes, Chico & Rita captures a defining moment in the evolution of history and jazz, and features the music of (and animated cameos by) Thelonious Monk, Charlie Parker, Cole Porter, Dizzy Gillespie, Woody Herman, Tito Puente, Chano Pozo, and others.



Mysteries of Lisbon (2010) 

85% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Raul Ruiz's masterful adaptation of the eponymous nineteenth-century Portuguese novel (by Camilo Castelo Branco) evokes the complex intertwined narratives of Victor Hugo and Charles Dickens.



Waste Land (2010) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,900 people have rated it.

Waste Land begins with an eco-friendly premise, but quickly transforms into an uplifting portrait of the power of art and the dignity of the human spirit.



Sound of Noise (2010) 

87% of critics love it, but only 5,100 people have rated it.

Police officer Amadeus Warnebring was born into a musical family with a long history of famous musicians.



Poetry (2010) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,300 people have rated it.

Poetry is an absorbing, poignant drama because it offers no easy answers to its complex central conflict.



Marwencol (2010) 

98% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

Inspiring and fascinating, Marwencol depicts its subject with heartfelt tenderness, raising poignant questions about art and personal tragedy along the way.



Nostalgia for the Light (2010) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

Melding the celestial quest of the astronomers and the earthly one of the women, NOSTALGIA FOR THE LIGHT is a gorgeous, moving, and deeply personal odyssey..--(c) Icarus



GasLand (2010) 

97% of critics love it, but only 9,100 people have rated it.

But is fracking safe?



Neds (2010) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

John McGill is a promising student at a tough Glasgow school who, despite a family background of alcoholism and abuse, looks set to sail into university and a bright future beyond.



The Tillman Story (2010) 

93% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

Passionate, angry, and insightful, The Tillman Story offers a revealing portrait of its subject's inspiring life and untimely death.



Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Radiant Child (2010) 

85% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

He became notorious for his graffiti art under the moniker Samo in the late 1970s on the Lower East Side scene, sold his first painting to Deborah Harry for $200, and became best friends with Andy Warhol.



A Film Unfinished (2010) 

96% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

A heartbreaking, haunting historical document, A Film Unfinished excavates particularly horrible chapter of Holocaust history, and in doing so, the film provides a glimpse into the Nazi propaganda machine.



Honey (2010) 

84% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Yusuf sees his mother becoming sadder everyday.



Bill Cunningham: New York (2010) 

98% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

Suffused with happiness and modest charm, Bill Cunningham New York offers a touching, gently humorous portrait of its subject without invading his jealously guarded privacy.



Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff (2010) 

96% of critics love it, but only 800 people have rated it.

Craig McCall's passionate film about the legendary cinematographer reveals a unique figure in British and international cinema.



Client 9: The Rise and Fall of Eliot Spitzer (2010) 

91% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

This documentary feature takes an in-depth look at the rapid rise and dramatic fall of New York Governor Eliot Spitzer.



Armadillo (2010) 

90% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

Director Janus Metz follows Danish soldiers fighting the Taliban in the Helmand province of southern Afghanistan with sophisticated visual artistry rarely achieved under such raw conditions.



The Autobiography of Nicolae Ceausescu (2010) 

87% of critics love it, but only 700 people have rated it.

Andrei Ujica During the summary trial that he and his wife were submitted to, Nicolae Ceausescu is reviewing his long reign in power: 1965-1989.



Le Quattro Volte (2010) 

92% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

Birth, death, and transformation are examined in Le Quattro Volte, a profound and often funny mediation on the cycles of life on earth.



A Cat in Paris (2010) 

82% of critics love it, but only 7,900 people have rated it.

A Cat in Paris depicts a stylish, imaginative world with a wonderful soundtrack and Hitchcockian overtones.



Fire in Babylon (2010) 

91% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

In a turbulent era of apartheid in South Africa; race riots in England and civil unrest in the Caribbean, the West Indian cricketers, led by the enigmatic Viv Richards, struck a defiant blow at the forces of white prejudice worldwide.



Public Speaking (2010) 

90% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

The film weaves together extemporaneous monologues featuring Fran Lebowitz with archival footage.The effect is a portrait of Fran's worldview and experiences.



The Boys: The Sherman Brothers' Story (2009) 

89% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

"The Boys" documents the extraordinary lives of two radically diverse siblings: the multi-award-winning songwriting team-- the Sherman Brothers (Robert B. Sherman and Richard M. Sherman).



Outrage (2009) 

78% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Outrage walks a difficult moral and ethical line -- and not always successfully -- but despite its flaws, it's a fascinating, provocative look at homosexuality in American politics.



Ajami (2009) 

97% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

This multi-character drama balances intimate portrayals and broad political implications to paint a bracing and moving portrait of the Middle East conflict.



City of Life and Death (2009) 

92% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

Director Lu Chuan directs this black-and-white docudrama account of that horrifying six-week period, with the benefit of an ensemble cast that includes Hideo Nakaizumi as a conscience-stricken Japanese soldier, Fan Wei as the aid to a German humanitarian worker, and Gao Yuanyuan as the head of a refugee camp.



Best Worst Movie (2009) 

95% of critics love it, but only 5,100 people have rated it.

In 1989, unwitting Utah actors starred in the undisputed worst movie in history: "Troll 2" decades later, the legendarily inept film's child star unravels the improbable, heartfelt story of an Alabama dentist-turned-cult movie icon and an Italian filmmaker who come to terms with this genuine, internationally revered cinematic failure.



Waking Sleeping Beauty (2009) 

70% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

It doesn't probe as deep -- or tell as many hard truths -- as it could have, but Don Hahn's look at Disney's rebirth offers a fascinating and surprisingly candorous glimpse into the studio's past.



American: The Bill Hicks Story (2009) 

82% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

A treasure trove of archival material and interviews, American: The Bill Hicks Story is an exuberant celebration about a unique, sorely missed voice in comedy.



Amreeka (2009) 

87% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

A dramedy that's got a taste for the tragic as well as the poignantly comic, Amreeka adds a new sweetness to the hope and distress of the immigrant experience.



The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers (2009) 

96% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

Daniel Ellsberg, a high-level Pentagon official and Vietnam War strategist, concludes that the war is based on decades of lies and leaks 7,000 pages of top secret documents to The New York Times, making headlines around the world.



The Art of the Steal (2009) 

85% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Deeply esoteric and unapologetically one-sided, The Art of the Steal proves a documentary doesn't have to make an objective argument as long as it argues well.



Police, Adjective (2009) 

78% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

(aka Police, Adjective) was an official selection at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival.



The Yes Men Fix the World (2009) 

77% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

The Yes Men aim their barbs at the capitalist fat-cats with gutsy and hilarious performance pranks.



Undertow (2009) 

87% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

Undertow (aka Contracorriente) was an official selection in World Cinema program the 2010 Sundance Film Festival, where it received the Audience Award for Best World Dramatic Feature.



Defamation (2009) 

85% of critics love it, but only 700 people have rated it.

What is anti-Semitism today, two generations after the Holocaust?



Tales from the Golden Age (2009) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

The final 15 years of the Ceausescu regime were the worst in Romania's history.



No One Knows About Persian Cats (2009) 

95% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

Bringing a dose of humor and a fresh perspective to a very serious subject, No One Knows About Persian Cats is an exhilarating, quietly powerful tribute to the courage of Iran's underground musicians.



Mugabe and the White African (2009) 

97% of critics love it, but only 900 people have rated it.

As much legal thriller as objective documentary, this account of a farmer's battle with Zimbabwe's regime serves as a powerful and emotional attack upon President Mugabe.



The Hedgehog (2009) 

87% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

As the unlikely friendship deepens, Paloma's own coming of age becomes a much less pessimistic prospect.



Last Train Home (2009) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

Last Train Home is a haunting, vivid documentary exploring the human toll of China's economic boom in intimate, unforgettable detail.



Tulpan (2008) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

Kazakh sheep herders get their cinematic due in this lovely, unsentimental debut from director Sergei Dvortsevoy.



The Black Balloon (2008) 

87% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

A tender and witty portrayal of a family coping with autism, The Black Balloon is heartfelt without being schmaltzy or moralizing.



Standard Operating Procedure (2008) 

78% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

Well researched and finely crafted, Standard Operating Procedure is another gem from master documentarian Errol Morris.



I.O.U.S.A. (2008) 

87% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

A potent and lithely constructed documentary about America's financial crisis, I.O.U.S.A grabs you with figures but holds you with irreverent wit.



Kisses (2008) 

84% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Although admittedly sleight, this gritty but tender coming-of-age Irish drama features some impressive work both in front, and behind the camera.



Every Little Step (2008) 

91% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Fascinating and insightful, Every Little Step is a thoroughly engrossing behind the scenes look at Broadway performers.



Not Quite Hollywood: The Wild, Untold Story of Ozploitation! (2008) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

A raucous, fast-paced celebration of the Ozploitation films that came out of Australia in the 1970s and 1980s.



The Song of Sparrows (2008) 

97% of critics love it, but only 5,000 people have rated it.

A heartfelt, affecting parable, The Song of Sparrows is another gem from Iranian director Majid Majidi.



Idiots and Angels (2008) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

Angels And Idiots tells its story without dialogue but does include songs from such artists as Tom Waits, Moby, Pink Martini and Nicole Renaud.



Goodbye Solo (2008) 

94% of critics love it, but only 5,100 people have rated it.

An original and thoughtful human drama, Goodbye Solo looks at relationships and loneliness while proving director Ramin Bahrani's is an important American voice.



35 Shots of Rum (2008) 

96% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

This slow-moving French family drama is rich, complex, subtle and emotionally eloquent.



The Beaches of Agnès (2008) 

95% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

An enchanting self-portrait by a veteran director, Beach of Agnes is equal parts playful and profound.



Trouble the Water (2008) 

96% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

This incredible documentary displays the tragedy and mismanagement of Katrina along with the heroism of strangers and survivors.



Flow: For Love of Water (2008) 

81% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

Flow is an informative, disturbing and enthralling film that highlights a criminally underreported problem.



Roman Polanski: Wanted and Desired (2008) 

85% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

A courtroom drama and an exploration of celebrity and responsibility.



Sita Sings the Blues (2008) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

A tour de force for filmmaker Nina Paley, Sita Sings the Blues gives the Ramayana its animated due with a visually vibrant, dazzlingly imaginative triumph.



Lorna's Silence (2008) 

85% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

Subtle and emotionally bleak, this gripping thriller features the Dardenne brothers' recognizable penchant for realism and very strong performances.



Under Our Skin (2008) 

80% of critics love it, but only 700 people have rated it.

A scathing indictment of the American medical system, Under Our Skin is timely, frightening stuff.



Of Time and the City (2008) 

94% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

Terrence Davies' heartfelt, sometimes funny new feature documentary is part scrapbook, part confessional.



Burma VJ: Reporting from a Closed Country (2008) 

96% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

A powerfully visceral docu-drama highlighting the evils of censorship and the essential need for freedom of speech.



Import Export (2007) 

84% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

A grim and disturbing vision from Ulrich Seidl, makes for an uncomfortable and uncompromising picture of life, that is anything but comfy and pedestrian.



I Have Never Forgotten You: The Life & Legacy of Simon Wiesenthal (2007) 

80% of critics love it, but only 1,100 people have rated it.

Academy Award-winning actress Nicole Kidman narrates.



Planet B-Boy (2007) 

82% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Lee's dazzling documentary makes a compelling argument for breakdancing as an art form.



Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten (2007) 

89% of critics love it, but only 5,500 people have rated it.

Displaying Joe Strummer warts and all, The Future is Unwritten succeeds as both an engrossing documentary and a comprehensive examination of one of music's most legendary figures.



Conversations with My Gardener (2007) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

Sweet natured and gentle French drama, that is bittersweet but never maudlin, with impressive performances from the leads.



My Brother Is an Only Child (2007) 

85% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

Luchetti takes advantage of the storyline's historical context without sacrificing his cast's fine performances or the script's light wit.



Helvetica (2007) 

88% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

In 2005 a number of provocative, award-winning ads appeared that touted the Helvetica font; Gary Hustwit explores the subject protractedly with his feature-length essay film Helvetica.



Roman de gare (2007) 

87% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

Claude Lelouch has crafted an engaging thriller about murder and romance with plenty of stylistic panache.



U2 3D (2007) 

93% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

3D transports the viewer to an intimate seat at a U2 performance, for an exhilarating musical experience at the price of a movie ticket.



Nanking (2007) 

95% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

This powerful and horrific documentary brings the atrocities committed at Nanking to light without sugarcoating any of the brutality.



The Devil Came on Horseback (2007) 

98% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

The Devil Came on Horseback is both a strong primer on the complexities of the situation in Darfur and a harrowing first-person doc.



For the Bible Tells Me So (2007) 

98% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

A timely and poignant examination of gays, their families and religion.



My Kid Could Paint That (2007) 

94% of critics love it, but only 4,000 people have rated it.

Director Amir Bar-Lev grapples with exposing the authenticity of four-year-old Marla's paintings at the sake of burdening her publicly shamed family to transfixing results.



No End in Sight (2007) 

95% of critics love it, but only 7,900 people have rated it.

Charles Ferguson's documentary provides a good summary of the decisions that led to the mess in post-war Iraq, and offers politically interested audiences something they'd been looking for: a lowdown on the decision making.



War Dance (2007) 

85% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

War/Dance is beautifully filmed, and effectively captures the heartbreaking and uplifting experiences of its subjects.



In the Shadow of the Moon (2007) 

94% of critics love it, but only 6,000 people have rated it.

Director David Sington poetically interwove 20th Century's cosmonautic history with its effect on the public's view of their country, their heroes and their future.



Shotgun Stories (2007) 

89% of critics love it, but only 6,800 people have rated it.

Thanks to a talented cast and its uncommon depth, Nichols' debut manages to rise above its overly familiar plot.



In Search of a Midnight Kiss (2007) 

85% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

Funny, quirky, and bittersweet, In Search of a Midnight Kiss is a romantic comedy with a heart and a brain -- and stands as a sharp debut for director Alex Holdridge.



Chop Shop (2007) 

96% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

Filled with excellent performances, Ramin Bahrani's deft sophomore effort is a heartfelt, hopeful neorealist look at the people who live in the gritty underbelly of New York City.



Pete Seeger: The Power of Song (2007) 

95% of critics love it, but only 400 people have rated it.

Pete Seeger: The Power of Song is both a tribute to a legendary singer and an informative account of the birth of American counterculture.



Confessions of a Superhero (2007) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

Now far from her former days as a Midwest beauty queen, Jennifer Gehrt walks the city streets dressed as whip-wielding do-gooder Wonder Woman.



Blind Mountain (2007) 

87% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Li's characters are imperfectly drawn, and the film follows a somewhat problematic arc, but Blind Mountain is nonetheless deeply compelling viewing.



Young@Heart (2007) 

88% of critics love it, but only 4,500 people have rated it.

Full of endearing characters, this doc about a choir of "seniors behaving badly" is uplifting and delightful.



My Winnipeg (2007) 

94% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

My Winnipeg is a charmingly irreverent 'docu-fantasy' from the unpredictable mind of Guy Maddin.



Up the Yangtze (2007) 

96% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

Up the Yangtze is a visually stunning meditation about the changes confronting modern China.



Stranded: I've Come from a Plane That Crashed on the Mountains (2007) 

91% of critics love it, but only 800 people have rated it.

Stranded is a thoroughly uplifting account of the well-known tragedy, with touching testimony from remaining survivors.



The English Surgeon (2007) 

88% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

On a trip to Kiev to give a lecture in 1992, Marsh was shocked to witness the plight of those with severe neurological problems there -- a ghastly world of primitive clinics, Kafkaesque bureaucracy, and medieval surgery - and began making regular trips back to diagnose patients and perform operations whenever possible.



I Served the King of England (2006) 

79% of critics love it, but only 7,800 people have rated it.

With charm and an eye for life's bittersweet moments, Czech New Wave master Jiri Menzel paints a picaresque story with whimsy and intellect.



God Grew Tired of Us (2006) 

91% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

Not just a powerful telling of the journey of exiled Sudanese boys, God Grew Tired of Us is also a poignant account of the determination of the human spirit.



Deep Sea (2006) 

91% of critics love it, but only 5,600 people have rated it.

Viewers will welcome being whisked away to this magical world of exotic sea life.



Azur & Asmar: The Princes' Quest (2006) 

80% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Azur and Asmar received its world premiere at the 2006 Cannes Film Festival.



Brand Upon the Brain! (2006) 

91% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

A bizarre, compelling spectacle that invests its absurd plot with heartfelt sincerety, Brand Upon the Brain! is a unique cinematic experience.



The Trials of Darryl Hunt (2006) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

In 1994, DNA testing cleared Hunt, yet he would spend another 10 years behind bars.



Requiem (2006) 

85% of critics love it, but only 4,900 people have rated it.

This harrowing, naturalistic drama holds you in its grip through Huller's intense performance.



Deep Water (2006) 

96% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

Equal parts mystery and biography, Deep Water is both an engrossing documentary and an affecting treatise on human folly and obsession.



Ten Canoes (2006) 

98% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

Ten Canoes combines adventure, comedy, and anthropology to explore an Aborigine folk tale both fallibly human and legendary. Helmer Rolf de Heer depicts a barely represented oral tradition with a clean style.



An Unreasonable Man (2006) 

91% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

A compelling documentary that humanizes the controversial, polarizing politician.



Offside (2006) 

94% of critics love it, but only 6,200 people have rated it.

A spirited film that explores gender politics with comedy, intelligence, and a variety of interesting characters.



Shadow Company (2006) 

85% of critics love it, but only 900 people have rated it.

Filmmakers Jason Bourque and Nick Bicanic explore the trend of private militaries around the world in this documentary examining the increasingly blurred distinction between soldier and mercenary.



The War Tapes (2006) 

98% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Candid, eye-opening footage gives viewers a close-up -- and educational -- look at the experiences of American soldiers in Iraq, a viewpoint not normally seen.



Kurt Cobain About a Son (2006) 

73% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

With a constant voiceover of his own words, About A Son is a deeply personal look into Cobain's life that is sure to please his many fans.



Blame it on Fidel (2006) 

93% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

Blame it on Fidel is a charming comedy of manners, class, and politics, elevated by a remarkable performance from lead child actor Nina Kervel.



The Cats of Mirikitani (2006) 

96% of critics love it, but only 800 people have rated it.

The Cats of Mirikitani is a look at an elderly street artist that turns into a sincere and deeply moving account of human compassion and healing.



Jar City (2006) 

94% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

A sublimely directed thriller, Jar City combines murder mystery, family drama and ample bits of Icelandic culture into a fascinating cinematic experience.



12:08 East of Bucharest (2006) 

95% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

With a witty script full of satirical overtones and dry humor, 12:08 East of Bucharest is a thoroughly enjoyable Romanian comedy.



Iraq for Sale: The War Profiteers (2006) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

Join documentary filmmaker Robert Greenwald (Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price, Outfoxed) in assessing the damage done to average Americans when corporations decide to wage war.



Kenny (2006) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,400 people have rated it.

Kenny uses its seemingly lowbrow mockumentary premise as the foundation for a well-acted and surprisingly thoughtful character study.



Reprise (2006) 

87% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

With Reprise, first-time director Joachim Trier effectively captures the spirit of young adulthood, and announces his arrival as a filmmaker to be watched.



The Pervert's Guide to Cinema (2006) 

87% of critics love it, but only 4,000 people have rated it.

Slovenian philosopher Slavoj Zizek forgoes the textbook stuff for a fun, probing look at cinema and the human emotional response to it.



Manufactured Landscapes (2006) 

83% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

Jennifer Baichwal follows the much acclaimed Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky while he travels the globe shooting landscapes transformed through commercial recycling, manufacturing and industrial production.



Out of the Blue (2006) 

84% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

The film co-stars Karl Urban; Graeme Tetley co-authored the script with Sarkies.



Lake of Fire (2006) 

94% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

Lake of Fire's engaging interviews and powerful black-and-white visuals make for a riveting and honest documentary about a very controversial topic.



Half Moon (2006) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Bahman Ghobadi's Half Moon is a beautiful and often humorous look into the lives of Kurdish wanderers.



Times and Winds (2006) 

87% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Lilting and meditative, Reha Erdem's story of three adolescents in rural Turkey captivates with intimate details and long takes of the endless countryside.



The Year My Parents Went on Vacation (2006) 

83% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

Hamburger deftly refracts the sociopolitical tumult of early '70s Brazil through the lens of a young boy's coming of age, and Joelsas' performance is wise beyond his years.



Tuya's Marriage (2006) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

The breathtaking landscapes of Inner Mongolia are a powerful backdrop for this quietly intense, dryly comical film.



The Rape of Europa (2006) 

83% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

For twelve long years, the Nazis looted and destroyed art on a scale unprecedented in history.



House of Sand (2005) 

78% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

Beautifully filmed with wonderful performances, this Brazilian tale deftly explores the passage of time and prolonged isolation in several decades of a mother and daughter relationship.



Look Both Ways (2005) 

75% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

With animated sequences adding imaginative quirkiness to the mix, this movie about death and disaster is insightful, empathic, and more uplifting than one would think.



Sweet Land (2005) 

84% of critics love it, but only 5,000 people have rated it.

Finding the right balance between subtle and sentimental, Sweet Land moves beyond other similarly-themed dramas with evocative cinematography that plays an equal role to the talented cast.



The Cave of the Yellow Dog (2005) 

88% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

A sparse, hauntingly beautiful journey across continents and cultures.



After Innocence (2005) 

91% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

This understated yet emotionally devastating documentary lets the stories of its subjects speak for themselves.



Ballets Russes (2005) 

91% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

Even if you know little about ballet, there is much to love about this documentary's captivating archival footage and its interviews with elderly former dancers who have much to share.



New York Doll (2005) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

Arthur Kane is a fascinating subject in what ultimately proves to be a touching, bittersweet documentary.



Rize (2005) 

83% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

The dances in Rize are electric even if the documentary doesn't go that deeply into the performers' lives.



Mad Hot Ballroom (2005) 

84% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

This heartwarming documentary will win audiences over, as the sheer charm of precocious, enthusiastic children learning to dance resonates from the screen.



Street Fight (2005) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

"Street Fight" chronicles the bare-knuckles race for Mayor of Newark, N.J. between Cory Booker, a 32-year-old Rhodes Scholar/Yale Law School grad, and Sharpe James, the four-term incumbent and undisputed champion of New Jersey politics.



Crossing the Bridge: The Sound of Istanbul (2005) 

86% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

Infused with cultural and political concerns, this film weaves together a rich tapestry of musical styles that celebrate the diversity that makes up contemporary Turkish life.



Pierrepoint: The Last Hangman (2005) 

77% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Director Adrian Shergold doesn't shy away from the darker elements of the movie's subject, and Timothy Spall is mesmerizing as the title character.



Man Push Cart (2005) 

87% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

This compassionate portrait of a New York City street vendor is as beautiful as it is melancholy.



Into Great Silence (2005) 

87% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

A meditative, deliberately paced doc capable of absorbing patient viewers into a whole different world.



The Beautiful Country (2004) 

77% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

The plight of Asian refugees is sensitively rendered, and the movie builds, with the help of Nolte, to a wrenchingly poignant conclusion.



Whisky (2004) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

When his competitive brother Herman comes to visit, Jacobo enlists his co-worker Marta to pretend to be his wife.



The Keys to the House (2004) 

80% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

Favoring subtlety over cheap sentimentality, The Keys to the House is emotionally honest, compassionate, and a genuine tear-jerker.



Walk on Water (2004) 

72% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

Politically complex and ambitious, Walk on Water delivers a memorable story of guilt, revenge, and human connectivity.



Intimate Strangers (2004) 

85% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

Intimate Strangers is Hitchcockian noir with a Gallic twist: Rather than simply imitating the genre's form, director/screenwriter Patrice Leconte delves into the underlying psychological drama.



Machuca (2004) 

89% of critics love it, but only 8,200 people have rated it.

Machuca is a touchingly bittersweet story of childhood friendship and a demonstration of how the political affects the personal.



Ae Fond Kiss... (2004) 

88% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

Casim Khan (Atta Yaqub) lives with his Punjabi-born Muslim family in Scotland.



Tropical Malady (2004) 

77% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

Sud Pralad ( aka Tropical Malady) was screened in competition at the 2004 Cannes Film Festival.



Saving Face (2004) 

85% of critics love it, but only 8,600 people have rated it.

A charming tale of a love affair that overcomes cultural taboos.



Mountain Patrol (2004) 

98% of critics love it, but only 4,000 people have rated it.

In a setting both visually stunning and cruel, this Eastern film evokes the epic spirit of old-fashioned Westerns.



Innocent Voices (2004) 

71% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

Innocent Voices is a passionately told dramatization of an ugly issue of war -- its impact on children.



Dig! (2004) 

89% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

So you wanna be a rock 'n' roll star? Dig! compellingly chronicles the ups and downs of the Dandy Warhols and the Brian Jonestown Massacre, two ambitious bands whose love/hate relationship embodies many of the potential pratfalls of the music business.



Riding Giants (2004) 

92% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

A great addition to the existing surfing documentaries.



In the Realms of the Unreal (2004) 

69% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

A fascinating treatment on the life of a reclusive man.



Control Room (2004) 

96% of critics love it, but only 5,600 people have rated it.

A fascinating, enlightening behind-the-scenes look at the Al Jazeera network.



Beautiful Boxer (2004) 

80% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

Beautiful Boxer blends boxing and identity politics to create a striking, if overdrawn, portrait of self discovery.



Going Upriver: The Long War of John Kerry (2004) 

89% of critics love it, but only 900 people have rated it.

Interesting and revealing footage of both Kerry and the Vietnam era in general.



Moolaadé (2004) 

98% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

A vibrant, powerful, and poignant glimpse into the struggles of women in modern Africa.



Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch's War on Journalism (2004) 

85% of critics love it, but only 6,000 people have rated it.

Neither fair nor balanced itself, Outfoxed offers an often entertaining indictment of the Fox News Channel.



Tony Takitani (2004) 

88% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Despite its deceptive wispiness, this delicately lovely and melancholy film about loneliness has a haunting power.



The World (2004) 

70% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Though perhaps too slowly paced and long, The World offers an intriguing glimpse into China's modernization and the growing ennui of some of its people.



Be Here to Love Me: A Film About Townes Van Zandt (2004) 

93% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

In concert, Lucinda Williams often dedicates "2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten" to him.



Darwin's Nightmare (2004) 

90% of critics love it, but only 5,200 people have rated it.

This eye-opening documentary brings some of the shocking effects of globalization to light.



Shake Hands with the Devil: The Journey of Roméo Dallaire (2004) 

87% of critics love it, but only 1,100 people have rated it.

A gut-wrenching documentary about the man in charge of the UN peace keeping force during the 1994 Rwanda genocide of 800,000 Tutsi and moderate Hutus.



Ushpizin (2004) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

Ushpizin offers a rare and warmly intimate look into ultra-Orthodox Jewish culture.



The Future of Food (2004) 

80% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

The Future of Food is a one-sided, but revelatory documentary about the dangers of genetically modified food.



A State of Mind (2004) 

89% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

Two young gymnasts prepare for the Mass Games, one of North Korea's most important and elaborate events.



Zelary (2003) 

72% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

Zelary is a satisfyingly old-fashioned romance with an epic sweep.



All the Real Girls (2003) 

71% of critics love it, but only 9,400 people have rated it.

Has enough honest moments to warrant a look.



I Capture the Castle (2003) 

79% of critics love it, but only 7,000 people have rated it.

A handsome and charming adaptation of the novel.



Step Into Liquid (2003) 

82% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

A perfect companion piece to The Endless Summer.



Fear and Trembling (2003) 

91% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

This tale of culture clash is by turns downbeat and hilarious.



Kitchen Stories (2003) 

89% of critics love it, but only 6,200 people have rated it.

By turns touching and funny, this Norwegian import offers quietly absorbing commentary on modern life and friendship.



Stander (2003) 

73% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

An unsatisfying account of Stander's life.



The Inheritance (2003) 

75% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Arven (aka The Inheritance) is the second part of a trilogy by director Per Fly on the three primary social classes, following his 2000 debut Baenken.



Wheel of Time (2003) 

94% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Celebrated filmmaker Werner Herzog turns his attention to one of the largest Buddhist gatherings in the world in this documentary.



Off the Map (2003) 

69% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

Excellent performances mark this leisurely paced film.



Since Otar Left (2003) 

96% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

A drama that's both funny and moving.



Bukowski: Born into This (2003) 

83% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

A thoroughly engrossing documentary examining the life of talented but troubled writer Charles Bukowski.



A Decade Under the Influence (2003) 

76% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

An expanded version of A Decade Under the Influence was seen as a three-part, three-hour TV miniseries, telecast on cable's Independent Film Channel beginning August 20, 2003.



My Flesh and Blood (2003) 

90% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Disturbing and heart-wrenching documentary about a 53-years-old woman raising 11 children.



Tom Dowd & the Language of Music (2003) 

90% of critics love it, but only 900 people have rated it.

Independent filmmaker Mark Moormann directs the feature-length documentary Tom Dowd and the Language of Music.



Blind Shaft (2003) 

94% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

A taut, biting critique on the new economic conditions in China.



Noi the Albino (2003) 

86% of critics love it, but only 7,400 people have rated it.

A darkly humorous, quirky coming-of-age film, enhanced by its Icelandic setting.



The Five Obstructions (2003) 

88% of critics love it, but only 6,800 people have rated it.

Both an intriguing intellectual exercise and an amusing look at the contrasts between the two filmmakers.



Save the Green Planet! (2003) 

87% of critics love it, but only 7,100 people have rated it.

A funny and wildly inventive hybrid of various genres, Save the Green Planet! is definitely a unique viewing experience.



Aileen: Life and Death of a Serial Killer (2003) 

86% of critics love it, but only 6,400 people have rated it.

This chilling, unsettling documentary provides an eye-opening look at both Wuornos and the American justice system.



Deep Blue (2003) 

67% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

This comprehensive presentation of images from the world's oceans, gathered over years of filming, plunges the audience into the spectacle of the seas.



The Saddest Music in the World (2003) 

78% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

Guy Maddin perfectly recreates the look and feel of a 1930s in this bizarre picture.



Baadasssss! (2003) 

90% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

An entertaining and intriguing tribute to a father from his son.



Osama (2003) 

96% of critics love it, but only 7,700 people have rated it.

Osama is bitterly honest, deeply disturbing, and utterly worth watching.



Crimson Gold (2003) 

86% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

A slow-burning, riveting film about Iranian class differences.



Festival Express (2003) 

96% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

Festival Express is a spellbinding documentary that nostalgically chronicles five days in the summer of 1970, when a train full of now- legendary rock perfomers jammed its way across Canada.



My Architect (2003) 

93% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

A moving and enlightening documentary about architect Louis Kahn.



The Story of the Weeping Camel (2003) 

94% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Delightful and strangely moving.



The Memory of a Killer (2003) 

83% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

Even though The Memory of a Killer is standard genre fare, it is also engaging and stylish.



Goodbye, Dragon Inn (2003) 

80% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

In a cavernous movie palace, King Hu's classic 1968 film Dragon Inn plays for a sparse crowd.



Travelers and Magicians (2003) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Interwined tales of spiritual discovery are set against a gorgeous, evocative landscape in this pleasant, engaging import.



Los Angeles Plays Itself (2003) 

95% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

A treat for cinephiles, this documentary is a comprehensive, academic, and enlightening film essay concerning Los Angeles and its depiction in the movies.



Charlie: The Life and Art of Charles Chaplin (2003) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

American film historian and author Richard Schickel directs the documentary Charlie: The Life and Art of Charles Chaplin.



Overnight (2003) 

77% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

This absorbing but wince-inducing documentary is a cautionary tale about the costs of hubris in the world of indie film.



Tarnation (2003) 

92% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

Using music and home video footage to great effect, Jonathan Caouette has made a very personal and moving film.



Orwell Rolls in His Grave (2003) 

79% of critics love it, but only 1,100 people have rated it.

Directed by Robert Kane Pappas, Orwell Rolls in His Grave questions whether the bleak, feverishly regulated world of author George Orwell's 1984 is no longer a dire fictional account of government power gone wrong but a creeping reality of recent American media trends.



The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill (2003) 

94% of critics love it, but only 4,000 people have rated it.

Interesting and appealing as both a study of man and nature.



The Tracker (2002) 

87% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

DeHeer takes a unique approach in the direction of this film; opting to show graphic paintings by artist Peter Coad during violent moments in lieu of filming bloody scenes among the actors.



Better Luck Tomorrow (2002) 

81% of critics love it, but only 8,300 people have rated it.

A promising work by Lin, the energetic Better Luck Tomorrow is disturbing and thought-provoking.



All or Nothing (2002) 

81% of critics love it, but only 7,000 people have rated it.

All or Nothing's depiction of the working-class can be depressingly bleak, but the performances are wonderfully true to life.



Respiro (2002) 

76% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

A sweet, but slight picture filled with beautiful people and locations.



Hukkle (2002) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

Understated, unconventional and observant.



Ten (2002) 

86% of critics love it, but only 5,100 people have rated it.

Ten turns a conversational car ride into a gritty and compelling character study full of real emotion while providing an intriguing look into the lives of women in contemporary Iranian culture.



The Kid Stays in the Picture (2002) 

91% of critics love it, but only 5,500 people have rated it.

Though not objective by any means, The Kid Stays in the Picture is irresistibly entertaining.



The Cuckoo (2002) 

87% of critics love it, but only 5,000 people have rated it.

As Finland's withdrawal from World War II draws ever closer, a tentative relationship between an abandoned Finnish soldier, a Lapp woman, and a Russian captain accused of anti-Soviet correspondence offers momentary solace to a trio of lost souls.



In This World (2002) 

88% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

Using documentary-style filmmaking to blur the lines between fact and fiction. In This World tells a harrowing but important story about the plight of refugees.



Blind Spot. Hitler's Secretary (2002) 

85% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

The testimony of Junge is more than enough to make this bare-bones documentary fascinating.



Standing in the Shadows of Motown (2002) 

91% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

A toe-tapping tribute to the band that gave Motown its sound.



Raising Victor Vargas (2002) 

96% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

A coming-of-age tale marked by its authenticity.



Marooned in Iraq (2002) 

92% of critics love it, but only 800 people have rated it.

Marooned in Iraq was screened as part of the "Un Certain Regard" series at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival.



To Be and to Have (2002) 

96% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

A small, sensitive, and moving portrait of a teacher and his students.



Oasis (2002) 

89% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

Lead actress Moon So-ri's stand out performance gives this harrowing film much of its power.



The Trials of Henry Kissinger (2002) 

94% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

This compelling unauthorized biography takes a muckraker's view of the controversial diplomat.



I Am Trying to Break Your Heart (2002) 

88% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

Besides being a treat for Wilco fans, I Am Trying to Break Your Heart also exposes the workings of a profit-driven music industry.



September 11 (2002) 

77% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Each filmmaker's entry takes a different approach: French director Claude Lelouch tells the tale of a World Trade Center tour guide who is on the verge of a breakup with his deaf girlfriend when the terrorist attacks hit; similarly, Hollywood actor-director Sean Penn chronicles the lonely existence of an old man living not far from the Twin Towers.



Comedian (2002) 

76% of critics love it, but only 6,200 people have rated it.

Comedian is an insightful look at the hard work of creating comedy.



Stevie (2002) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

Poignant documentary that's hard to forget.



Yossi & Jagger (2002) 

86% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

A tersely told yet deeply felt romance.



Bus 174 (2002) 

97% of critics love it, but only 7,100 people have rated it.

Regardless, a police officer then decided to fire at Nascimento anyway, accidentally killing one of the female passengers instead.



The Weather Underground (2002) 

91% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

Fascinating documentary about the militant Weathermen.



Scratch (2001) 

93% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

Whether you know anything about turntablism or not, Scratch makes for fun and informative viewing.



Baran (2001) 

88% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

The lyrical Baran is a moving film, both for its love story and political underpinnings.



La Ciénaga (2001) 

87% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

While seemingly improvised, La Cienaga was actually carefully scripted by Lucrecia Martel, who won a screenwriting award at the 1999 Sundance Film Festival prior to making her directorial debut with this feature.



L.I.E. (2001) 

83% of critics love it, but only 8,200 people have rated it.

L.I.E. is a well-acted and unsettling look at a boy's relationship with a pedophile.



Mostly Martha (2001) 

91% of critics love it, but only 7,600 people have rated it.

Mostly Martha may have a predictable plot, but it still feels charming and fresh, and the food will make you hungry.



Under the Skin of the City (2001) 

86% of critics love it, but only 900 people have rated it.

Tuba works daily at a grueling textile factory in Iran, returning home every night to deal with the rest of her problematic family, which includes: a pregnant daughter whose husband beats her regularly; a teenage son, who's been getting into trouble due to his burgeoning career in radical politics; and an older son who goes to great lengths--such as attempting to sell the family's meager house--in order to get an engineering job in Japan as a means of getting out of Iran.



The Grey Zone (2001) 

69% of critics love it, but only 8,100 people have rated it.

A grim and devastating tale of the Holocaust.



Last Orders (2001) 

78% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

With a cast that includes some of the best acting talent in Britain, Last Orders is a rewarding character-driven ensemble piece.



Startup.com (2001) 

92% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

Startup.com is more than just a look at the rise and fall of the new economy. At its center is a friendship being tested to the limit, and that's what makes it worth viewing.



Children Underground (2001) 

94% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

The first feature from documentarian Edet Belzberg, Children Underground received an enthusiastic reception and many positive reviews after its screenings at the 2001 Sundance Film Festival.



Thirteen Conversations About One Thing (2001) 

83% of critics love it, but only 8,700 people have rated it.

Thirteen Conversations About One Thing is an intelligent and poignant look at lives intersecting.



What Time Is It There? (2001) 

84% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

Though it requires patience to view, What Time Is It There?'s exploration of loneliness is both elegant and haunting.



Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures (2001) 

85% of critics love it, but only 8,600 people have rated it.

Among those who share their thoughts in Stanley Kubrick -- A Life In Pictures are actors Jack Nicholson, Tom Cruise, Nicole Kidman, Malcolm McDowell, Peter Ustinov, and Keir Dullea; writers Arthur C. Clarke and Michael Herr; special effects artist Douglas Trumbull; composers Wendy Carlos and Gyorgy Ligeti; filmmakers Woody Allen, Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, Paul Mazursky, and Sydney Pollack; and Kubrick's spouse Christiane Kubrick.



Promises (2001) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

A heartbreaking and illuminating look at the Israeli and Palestinian conflict through the eyes of children.



Life and Debt (2001) 

90% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

The program represents the views of Jamaican workers and farmers, as well as government officials and policy experts.



Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner (2001) 

90% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Compelling human drama and stunning cinematography make The Fast Runner an absorbing experience.



Autumn Spring (2001) 

97% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

Fanda (Vlastimil Brodsky of Larks on a String), an elderly former actor, can't resist playing practical jokes on everyone around him.



Late Marriage (2001) 

87% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

An observant black comedy about arranged marriages and tradition.



Behind the Sun (2001) 

73% of critics love it, but only 5,200 people have rated it.

Visually poetic, Behind the Sun is a powerful statement about cycles of violence.



Take Care of My Cat (2001) 

81% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Feeling most rejected, shy Ji-yeong finds comfort in her new friendship with rebel Tae-hee.



All About Lily Chou-Chou (2001) 

68% of critics love it, but only 7,500 people have rated it.

As they negotiate teen badlands- school bullies, parents from another planet, lurid snapshots of sex and death- these everyday rebels without a cause seek sanctuary, even salvation, through pop star savior Lily Chou-Chou, embracing her sad, dreamy songs and sharing their fears and secrets in Lilyholic chat rooms.



Rivers and Tides: Andy Goldsworthy Working with Time (2001) 

98% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

Andy Goldsworthy and his art are beautifully captured in this engaging documentary.



War Photographer (2001) 

80% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

War Photographer was screened at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival.



Faithless (2000) 

85% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

This brooding, measured look at adultery is ultimately emotionally riveting, thanks to its script and performances.



Aberdeen (2000) 

86% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

Though the characters are difficult to watch at times, Aberdeen burns with ferocious honesty and strong performances.



The House of Mirth (2000) 

81% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

Despite being a period piece, The House of Mirth's depiction of social cruelty still feels chilling and relevant for today.



Two Family House (2000) 

88% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

In 1956, factory worker and frustrated singer Buddy Visalo, who realizes his dream to buy a two family house in Staten Island for himself and his wife Estelle and convert the ground floor into a neighborhood bar where he can perform, encounters unexpected problems and romantic complications when attempting to evict tenants.



Tully (2000) 

80% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

A beautifully acted, quietly moving little film.



The Taste of Others (2000) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,400 people have rated it.

The Taste of Others is a fresh, witty comedy about the attraction of opposites. The characters are well-drawn and engaging and their social interactions believable.



With a Friend Like Harry... (2000) 

95% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

A darkly funny thriller that's reminiscent of Hitchcock.



Maelstrom (2000) 

80% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

During one rainy summer night, 25-year-old Bibiane Champagne hits a man with her car.



The Vertical Ray of the Sun (2000) 

81% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

The Vertical Ray of the Sun is gorgeously, poetically composed, lulling the viewer into its story of everyday life.



Dinner Rush (2000) 

91% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

With the aid of a witty script and a well-acted ensemble, Dinner Rush is a tasty dish.



Divided We Fall (2000) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

Divided We Fall takes a complex look at World War II, skillfully balancing humor and gravity.



Suzhou River (2000) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

Recalling both Vertigo (1958) and Chungking Express (1994), Chinese director Lou Ye spins this riveting tale of obsession and love.



Dark Days (2000) 

94% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

Marc Singer's documentary about a group of homeless people living beneath the streets of New York City is haunting and uplifting in equal measure.



The Filth and the Fury (2000) 

95% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

The Filth and the Fury is a complete and completely unabashed look at The Sex Pistols, shot in suitably propulsive punk fashion.



Paragraph 175 (2000) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

Paragraph 175 interviews the few surviving homosexuals who endured unspeakable horrors under the Nazi regime.



101 Reykjavík (2000) 

89% of critics love it, but only 8,000 people have rated it.

A funny, offbeat romantic comedy about an unlikely tryst with the beautiful Icelandic landscape as a backdrop.



Sound and Fury (2000) 

96% of critics love it, but only 900 people have rated it.

This documentary presents its opposing views in an even-handed yet emotionally engaging manner. Critics say it will provoke much thought, as well as emotions, in the audience.



Eureka (2000) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

With its subtitles and a running time nearing four hours, Eureka certainly places demands upon its viewers. For those with the patience, however, this visually lovely film builds to an emotionally resonant vision of transcendence.



Chunhyang (2000) 

85% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

Chunhyang made its North American Premiere at the 2000 Toronto International Film Festival.



The Gleaners & I (2000) 

92% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

Both a diary and a kind of extended essay on poverty, thrift and the curious place of scavenging in French history and culture--a documentary capturing the world of French gleaners who collect and make use of what others have discarded.



Into the Arms of Strangers: Stories of the Kindertransport (2000) 

91% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

Although it appears to be nothing more than a "talking heads" documentary you may see on TV, Into the Arms of Strangers, nonetheless, tells a heart-wrenching story.



Innocence (2000) 

81% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

Not only does it break ground in presenting a rarely examined age group, Innocence is a well-acted, powerful story about love.



Last Resort (2000) 

94% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Critics are raving about Last Resort, saying it's a convincing, touching tale. Particularly impressive is the lack of script during the film's shoot.



George Washington (2000) 

83% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

Tragedy strikes when one of George's friends is accidentally killed and the group, fearing punishment, decides to hide the body.



The Endurance (2000) 

95% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

The Endurance presents exciting footage of an amazing real-life story of survival.



Happy Times (2000) 

71% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

One of Zhang's smaller films, Happy Times is nevertheless moving and bittersweet.



Aimee & Jaguar (1999) 

89% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

A gripping examination of sexual taboos, set against the backdrop of Nazi Germany, bolstered by a subtly shaded script and a strong cast.



Three Seasons (1999) 

78% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

With sweeping directorial vision and a powerful poetic narrative, Tony Bui has created an enormously impressive feature debut about the "new" Vietnam.



The War Zone (1999) 

83% of critics love it, but only 6,900 people have rated it.

The molten emotional power that flows from Tim Roth's directorial debut carries multiple messages that sear one's soul.



The Winslow Boy (1999) 

97% of critics love it, but only 5,200 people have rated it.

Just after the family toasts, Arthur discovers that his youngest son, Ronnie, is back early from the Naval College at Osbourne--dismissed for stealing a five shilling postal note.



Spring Forward (1999) 

87% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Shot in sequence over a one-year period, Spring Forward received a third-place mention for best first feature at the 1999 Toronto Film Festival.



Twin Falls Idaho (1999) 

77% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

In this film, conjoined twins Blake and Francis Falls share many vital organs.



Limbo (1999) 

71% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

When Joe meets Donna De Angelo (Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio), however, he starts to come out of his shell.



Felicia's Journey (1999) 

87% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

A solitary middle-aged bachelor and a naive Irish teenager transform one another's lives to arrive at a place of recognition, redemption and wisdom in Felicia's Journey, writer/director Atom Egoyan's adaptation of William Trevor's celebrated 1994 novel.



Liberty Heights (1999) 

87% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

A moving film with moments of humor, Liberty Heights succeeds in capturing the feel of the '50s with great performances and sensitive direction.



Ratcatcher (1999) 

84% of critics love it, but only 6,200 people have rated it.

Critics find Ratcatcher to be hauntingly beautiful, though its story is somewhat hard to stomach.



My Voyage to Italy (1999) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

Included: Luchino Visconti, Federico Fellini, Vittorio De Sica, Roberto Rossellini and Michelangelo Antonioni.



Jesus' Son (1999) 

81% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

(He certainly fails with Michelle).



It All Starts Today (1999) 

81% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

Set in a forlorn mining town in the north of France, the story is about one man's struggle to bring life to his once-prosperous village.



Mr. Death: The Rise and Fall of Fred A. Leuchter, Jr. (1999) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,500 people have rated it.

Mr. Death outlines its subject's controversial life's work with the deeply fascinating and thought-provoking élan film fans have come to expect from director Errol Morris.



Not One Less (1999) 

95% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

When he is called away to tend to his dying mother for a month, the Mayor calls in an inexperienced 13 year-old replacement, Wei Minzhi; much to Teacher Gao's dismay.



Beau travail (1999) 

80% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

When Sentain (Gregoire Colin), a new recruit, joins the troops, Galoup believes that it upsets the delicate balance between the C.O.



Beyond the Mat (1999) 

81% of critics love it, but only 7,900 people have rated it.

Even if you aren't a fan, Beyond the Mat provides a riveting, perceptive look into the world of professional wrestling by taking a closer look at the people beneath the personas.



Human Resources (1999) 

96% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

When Franck's efforts to better the company lead to the firing of many employees, including his father, a furious confrontation ensues, forcing father and son to ponder their relationship while realizing their individual lives.



One Day in September (1999) 

96% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

Produced by two-time Oscar winner Arthur Cohn,One Day in September earned Cohn another trophy when it received an Academy Award as Best Documentary Feature.



Xiu Xiu: The Sent-Down Girl (1998) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

Actress Joan Chen makes her directorial debut with this bleak tale, adapted from the award-winning novella "Tian Yu" by Shanghai writer Yan Geling, about the loss of innocence during Mao Zedong's brutal Cultural Revolution.



Without Limits (1998) 

78% of critics love it, but only 7,000 people have rated it.

This drama about American track star and hero Steve Prefontaine intelligently looks at the character of this oft mythologized athlete and features a fantastic performance by Donald Sutherland as Prefontaine's trainer.



The Dreamlife of Angels (1998) 

92% of critics love it, but only 5,600 people have rated it.

Showcasing excellent lead performances, The Dreamlife of Angels is an intelligent, absorbing character study of two women.



Everest (1998) 

92% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

This is the story of the 1996 Everest Film Expedition, a MacGillivray Freeman production in association with Arcturus Motion Pictures.



The General (1998) 

81% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

Throughout his adult life, Martin Carhillderived satisfaction from making fools out of authority figures.



Besieged (1998) 

75% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

Disenchanted with her country, Shandurai surfaces in Rome at the home of an eccentric English musician, Mr. Kinsky (David Thewlis).



The Cruise (1998) 

85% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Director Bennett Miller's documentary portrait of tour bus guide/street philosopher Timothy (Speed) Levitch is an unsummarizable comedy, tragedy, love letter to the city and the anatomy of innocence.



Earth (1998) 

85% of critics love it, but only 6,000 people have rated it.

Deepa Mehta directs this tale about the 1947 Partition of India.



Hilary and Jackie (1998) 

86% of critics love it, but only 7,800 people have rated it.

Brilliant performances, lush cinematography, and complex storytelling deserve audience's attention.



Dr. Akagi (1998) 

94% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

One day he happens upon a bruised and battered Dutch soldier (Jacques Gamblin) who escaped from the local POW camp.



Last Night (1998) 

83% of critics love it, but only 8,200 people have rated it.

An engrossing, poignant film, Last Night examines the end of the world through humorous and thought-provoking dialogue.



Eternity and a Day (1998) 

95% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

Theo Angelopoulos (Reconstruction) directed this 1998 Cannes Film Festival Palme d'Or winner about a famed author nearing the end of his life.



The Apple (1998) 

80% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

A documentary of an Iranian, impoverished and religious father who kept his twin daughters locked up at home for the first 12 years of their lives.



West Beirut (1998) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

This French-Lebanese-Belgian co-production is an autobiographical drama.



The Emperor and the Assassin (1998) 

80% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

Produced on a lavish budget by Chinese standards ($15 million), Jing Ke Ci Qin Wang/The Emperor and the Assassin was directed by Chen Kaige, best known to Western audiences for the international success Farewell My Concubine.



Cabaret Balkan (1998) 

78% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

Nikola Ristanovski, Nebojsa Glogovac, Miki Manojlovic, Marko Urosevic, Bogdan Diklic, Dragan Nikolic.



The Last Days (1998) 

90% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

Shown at the 1998 Mill Valley Film Festival.



Kirikou and the Sorceress (1998) 

96% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

Kirikou and the Sorceress is a beautifully uplifting throwback to a simpler animated era, with refreshingly unique art and a timeless soundtrack.



4 Little Girls (1997) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

4 Little Girls finds Spike Lee moving into documentary filmmaking with his signature style intact -- and all the palpable fury the subject requires.



The Butcher Boy (1997) 

77% of critics love it, but only 7,200 people have rated it.

Neil Jordan's superb adaptation of Pat McCabe's disturbing 1992 novel about a 12-year-old Irish boy's descent into madness.



Career Girls (1997) 

87% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Two seemingly self-assured and successful friends reminisce about their college days only to unpack the emotional baggage they have both been carrying for six long years.



Eve's Bayou (1997) 

81% of critics love it, but only 7,900 people have rated it.

Finding her beliefs in family loyalty crumbling, the young girl visits voodoo priestess Elzora (Diahann Carroll).



Fast, Cheap & Out of Control (1997) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

In this film, four eccentrics talk about their seemingly diverse lives, interests, and offbeat occupations: Lion tamer Dave Hoover offers theories about wild animal thought processes; topiary gardener George Mendo clips hedges to various creatures; mole-rat specialist Ray Mendez researches the animals' behavior; robotics scientist Rodney Brooks assembles autonomous robots.



Love and Death on Long Island (1997) 

86% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

John Hurt gives a career performance in this wry, offbeat comedy about a stodgy British novelist whose sudden infatuation with an American pop star (Jason Priestley) gives his life a dangerous and exhilarating twist.



Rosewood (1997) 

85% of critics love it, but only 7,300 people have rated it.

In early January 1923, a tiny Florida town primarily inhabited by prosperous African American families was burned to the ground by angry whites from a neighboring town.



Sick: The Life & Death of Bob Flanagan, Supermasochist (1997) 

91% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

The film includes explicit scenes of genital self-mutilation.



Trekkies (1997) 

85% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Why this particular show?



Ulee's Gold (1997) 

94% of critics love it, but only 4,500 people have rated it.

Ulee retrieves her but runs into Jimmy's former partners who demand money from him.



Waco: The Rules of Engagement (1997) 

87% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

To build his case, filmmaker William Gazecki edited together interviews, news footage, home movies and television coverage on the Senate hearings.



The Wings of the Dove (1997) 

83% of critics love it, but only 7,600 people have rated it.

British director Ian Softley's take on this lesser-known Henry James novel offers a tightly-woven, witty look at clashing social classes in turn-of-the-century Europe as it tells the tale of a strong-willed aristocratic girl who takes drastic measures to marry her lower-class lover.



Winter Sleepers (1997) 

76% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

This stylish effort is the second film of German director Tom Tykwer, whose debut film Deadly Maria earned him favorable reviews.



Henry Fool (1997) 

89% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

A comic pageant of ironic gestures.



Cure (1997) 

91% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

Mesmerizing and psychologically intriguing.



The Big One (1997) 

92% of critics love it, but only 7,200 people have rated it.

Cameo appearances include Garrison Keillor and Studs Terkel.



The Harmonists (1997) 

80% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

This fact-based German musical drama chronicles the lives of a popular barbershop sextet in Nazi Germany during the '30s.



Little Dieter Needs to Fly (1997) 

92% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

The film is divided into four chapters, each representing a period from Dengler's life; the story is recounted via interviews with the Navy pilot, archival footage and new footage seamlessly spliced together.



Citizen Ruth (1996) 

80% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

Yet Ruth soon finds her new friends are also only interested in her value as a media icon.



Hype! (1996) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

It also features a technically shaky but historically priceless clip of Nirvana's first public performance of "Smells Like Teen Spirit".



Irma Vep (1996) 

91% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

A has-been French filmmaker makes a desperate comeback attempt with an homage to "Les Vampires."



Jude (1996) 

80% of critics love it, but only 8,000 people have rated it.

Remaining quite true to the tone and narrative style of Thomas Hardy's ultimate tragic novel Jude the Obscure, this British period drama follows the hopeless attempts of a bright country boy to realize his dream of attending a university.



Prisoner of the Mountains (1996) 

88% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

In this unsettling Russian film, two captured Russian soldiers are engaged in a waiting game with their captors in a remote Caucasian village.



Looking for Richard (1996) 

81% of critics love it, but only 6,900 people have rated it.

Looking for Richard is a smart, fascinating behind-the-scenes look at adapting Shakespeare.



Ponette (1996) 

90% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Writer and director Jacques Doillon carefully coached Victoire Thivisol (who was too young to read the screenplay) through her performance; the results earned the child Best Actress honors at the 1996 Venice Film Festival.



Ridicule (1996) 

77% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

Set in late 18th-century France during the reign of Louis XVI, this costumer provides a fascinating glance into a time where a cruel rapier wit would take one further up the social ladder than gold, land, or birthright and where ridicule could drive a man to suicide.



Family Resemblances (1996) 

88% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

A family birthday party collapses into trauma and in-fighting in this ironic French comedy-drama.



The Whole Wide World (1996) 

76% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Renee Zellweger and Vincent D'Onofrio both deliver fine performances and are a believable (if unconventional) romantic couple; D'Onofrio also co-produced.



Anne Frank Remembered (1995) 

96% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

This moving documentary tells the story of Anne Frank, the teenage Holocaust victim whose diary has been read by millions.



Antonia's Line (1995) 

67% of critics love it, but only 6,800 people have rated it.

Magical and morbid, Antonia picturesque landscapes and proficient performances elevate a somewhat pedestrian parable.



The Celluloid Closet (1995) 

95% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

The Celluloid Closet takes a thought-provoking look at the decades of omission and misrepresentation endured by the gay community in mainstream cinema.



The Flower of My Secret (1995) 

83% of critics love it, but only 7,600 people have rated it.

One bright point is a new friendship with Angel, cultural editor of the daily paper El Pais, who unknowingly hires her to write an attack on her nom de plume, Amanda Gris.



My Family (1995) 

84% of critics love it, but only 4,900 people have rated it.

Featuring Jennifer Lopez in her first major big-screen role, Gregory Nava's My Family traces three generations of the Sanchez's, a Mexican-American family living in East Los Angeles.



Nelly & Monsieur Arnaud (1995) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

Arnaud enlists her help with transcribing his memoirs and, as their unconventional relationship blossoms, barely-contained emotions threaten to break free.



Land and Freedom (1995) 

76% of critics love it, but only 7,100 people have rated it.

The internecine conflicts and heated passions of the Spanish Civil War, brought to glorious life by soft-smoldering firebrand Ken Loach.



Bandit Queen (1994) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

This gripping Indian-British film relates the true story of Phoolan Devi, an Indian woman arrested in the state of Uttar Pradesh in January 1983 for kidnapping and murder.



Lamerica (1994) 

90% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

Gino (Enrico Lo Verso) and his partner in crime Fiore (Michele Placido) come to Albania with a money-making scheme designed to capitalize on the surrounding political chaos.



Priest (1994) 

69% of critics love it, but only 6,900 people have rated it.

A deft directorial debut from Antonia Bird, Priest handles its sensitive subject with care -- despite certain sanctimonious sentiments.



The Secret of Roan Inish (1994) 

95% of critics love it, but only 6,800 people have rated it.

The Secret of Roan Inish is a gentle fairy tale filled with optimism that's suitable for the whole family.



Vanya on 42nd Street (1994) 

88% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

Beautiful performances and the subtle hand of master Louis Malle make this adaptation of Chekov's Uncle Vanya an eccentric presentation of an enduring classic.



Fear of a Black Hat (1993) 

85% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

Writer/director Rusty Cundieff's satire of gangsta rappers, focusing on a hiphop trio who release a Christmas album called "Ho Ho 'Hos."



King of the Hill (1993) 

96% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

A subtle, affecting, character-driven coming-of-age story, King of the Hill is one of Steven Soderbergh's best and most criminally overlooked films.



The Wonderful, Horrible Life of Leni Riefenstahl (1993) 

95% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Macht der Bilder: Leni Riefenstahl was released in the United States under the title The Wonderful, Horrible Life of Leni Riefenstahl.



The Scent of Green Papaya (1993) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,400 people have rated it.

Moving, engrossing tale of a Vietnamese country girl who goes to work for a merchant family in Saigon in the years prior to the war.



Raining Stones (1993) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Jim Allen wrote this comedy/drama about a poor British family struggling to raise the money for their daughter's first Communion dress.



Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould (1993) 

89% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

The highly acclaimed and famously eccentric classical pianist Glenn Gould is the subject of this idiosyncratic film portrait.



The War Room (1993) 

95% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

A look inside the 1992 presidential race, D.A.



A Midnight Clear (1992) 

86% of critics love it, but only 5,600 people have rated it.

Beautifully filmed and wonderfully acted, A Midnight Clear is a holiday war film in search of a wider audience.



Olivier, Olivier (1992) 

84% of critics love it, but only 900 people have rated it.

Meanwhile, he must overcome his brooding, adolescent sister's jealousy and doubts about his identity and reconcile his sleazy street life with his picturesque new surroundings.



One False Move (1992) 

98% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

Carl Franklin made his directorial bow with the story of three LA drug dealers who, after committing a rather messy murder, hide out in a rural Arkansas town.



Brother's Keeper (1992) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

Bill, Delbert, Roscoe and Lyman Ward, were four barely literate bachelor brothers, aged 59 to 71, living in squalor on their 99-acre dairy farm in Munnsville, a rural town in central New York.



The Best Intentions (1992) 

81% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Henrik Bergman (Samuel Froler) is a struggling theology student in the year 1909.



Incident at Oglala (1992) 

100% of critics love it, but only 800 people have rated it.

Michael Apted's documentary examines the 1975 slaying of two FBI agents in Oglala, SD, which resulted in the arrest and conviction of Native American activist Leonard Peltier for the murders.



Passion Fish (1992) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

Back home, Mary-Alice frightens off a succession of home-care nurses until a young black woman named Chantelle (Alfre Woodard) arrives to give the job a try.



La Belle Noiseuse (1991) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

A sensual and hypnotic masterpiece, La Belle Noiseuse luxuriates in its four-hour run time while holding audience attention.



City of Hope (1991) 

94% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Set in the fictional New Jersey metropolis of Hudson, three intricately interwoven tales involving real estate, robbery, and racial tension comprise a complex study of crime, corruption, and political machinery.



Enchanted April (1991) 

83% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

Mike Newell's adaptation of Elizabeth von Arnim's moves at a more generous pace than the 1935 version, allowing excellent performances from Miranda Richardson and Joan Plowright to flourish.



Flirting (1991) 

95% of critics love it, but only 5,500 people have rated it.

A terrific follow-up to The Year My Voice Broke, Flirting is a teen movie worth watching, thanks to emotionally engaging performances and an endearing script.



Homicide (1991) 

91% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

A Jewish homicide detective investigates a seemingly minor murder and falls in with a Zionist group as a result.



Let Him Have It (1991) 

81% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

Led by a gripping performance from Christopher Eccleston, Let Him Have It sounds a compelling call for justice on behalf of its real-life protagonist.



Proof (1991) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,500 people have rated it.

The story of a blind man's search for the ultimate truth.



A Brief History of Time (1991) 

94% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

Though of necessity a "talking heads" effort, A Brief History of Time is also cunningly and subtly cinematic.



American Dream (1990) 

100% of critics love it, but only 900 people have rated it.

This consultant's aggressive, no-compromise approach turns the conflict into national news but also alienates management.



An Angel at My Table (1990) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,000 people have rated it.

Laura Jones adapted Janet Frame's autobiographical books To The Is-Land, The Envoy From Mirror City, and An Angel At My Table for this New Zealand made-for-television miniseries which dramatizes her youth, when she was wrongfully confined in a mental institution for eight years, and her subsequent acclaim as a writer after her release.



Avalon (1990) 

82% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

The third of director Barry Levinson's autobiographical "Baltimore Trilogy" (the first two entries were Diner and Tin Men), Avalon covers nearly forty years in the lives of an immigrant Jewish family.



Ju Dou (1990) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

Due to his own impotence, Ju Dou cannot bear the son Yang Jin-shan desperately wants; as a result, their marriage becomes violent and bitterly unhappy, forcing the girl into the arms of the old man's nephew Yang Tian-qing (Li Bao-tian).



Life Is Sweet (1990) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

The youngish parents, Wendy (Alison Steadman) and Andy (Jim Broadbent) live with their 20-something twin daughters, Nicola (Jane Horrocks) and Natalie (Claire Skinner).



Metropolitan (1990) 

91% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

An ironically comic look at Manhattan's endangered debutante scene, Metropolitan chronicles the rise and ultimate decline of a group of young Park Avenue socialites who gather nightly to discuss love, honor, and the impending demise of their class.



Paris Is Burning (1990) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Paris Is Burning dives into '80s transgender subculture, with the understated camera allowing this world to flourish and the people to speak (and dance) for themselves.



Trust (1990) 

82% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

The unlikely relationship between a pregnant high school student and a brooding electronics repairman lies at the center of this droll comedy from writer-director Hal Hartley.



A Dry White Season (1989) 

83% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Set in South Africa during the mid '70s when apartheid was still the norm, this provocative drama centers on a white schoolmaster's gradual awakening to the horrors of government-sanctioned racism.



For All Mankind (1989) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

For All Mankind features a score by experimental rock composer Brian Eno.



Monsieur Hire (1989) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Hire worships a beautiful neighbor (Sandrine Bonnaire) from afar.



Creature Comforts (1989) 

92% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

Creature Comforts is an Oscar-winning animated short from Aardman Animations and director Nick Park, the creator of the Wallace & Gromit series.



Longtime Companion (1989) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

Longtime Companion is a sensitive ensemble AIDS drama, lensed with sympathy which builds to a moving finale.



Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988) 

80% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

Bracingly original and beautifully composed, Distant Voices, Still Lives is an invigorating period drama that finds director Terence Davies in peak form.



Let's Get Lost (1988) 

96% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

We have to be grateful to iconic fashion photographer Bruce Weber, for giving us this perfect film about the timeless jazz singer and trumpeter, Chet Baker.



Salaam Bombay! (1988) 

92% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

Salaam Bombay!



Miracle Mile (1988) 

88% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Miracle Mile starts conventionally enough, with bashful musician Anthony Edwards going ga-ga over waitress Mare Winningham.



84 Charing Cross Road (1987) 

86% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

Despite several attempts, they never manage to meet.



Chuck Berry Hail! Hail! Rock 'n' Roll (1987) 

85% of critics love it, but only 800 people have rated it.

Hail!



The Dead (1987) 

92% of critics love it, but only 4,500 people have rated it.

The final film of legendary director John Huston was based on the closing story of James Joyce's Dubliners.



Law of Desire (1987) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,400 people have rated it.

Law of Desire is kinky fun that's as explosively bright and provocative as ever.



Prick Up Your Ears (1987) 

93% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

This unadorned biography of playwright Joe Orton (Gary Oldman) charts his bawdy, dangerous relationships.



The Year My Voice Broke (1987) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

The life of a teen in an isolated small town is the subject of Australian writer/director John Duigan's film, set in 1962 in New South Wales.



'Round Midnight (1986) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

Saxophonist Dexter Gordon portrays Dale Turner, a fictional musician inspired by a number of famed jazz figures, including Bud Powell and Lester Young.



The Decline of the American Empire (1986) 

85% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

Preparing a gourmet dinner, four male intellectuals begin trading stories of their sexual experiences.



Mauvais Sang (1986) 

91% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

This critically acclaimed French drama blends film noir and science fiction elements in a story about a strange and deadly plague.



Lost in America (1985) 

96% of critics love it, but only 5,200 people have rated it.

A satire of the American fantasy of leaving it all behind, Lost in America features some of Albert Brooks' best, most consistent writing and cultural jabs.



Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters (1985) 

88% of critics love it, but only 4,900 people have rated it.

Paul Schrader's directorial masterpiece is a classy and imaginative portrait enriched by a stunning score and impressive cinematography.



Murphy's Romance (1985) 

72% of critics love it, but only 5,600 people have rated it.

Newly divorced Emma Moriarty (Sally Field) moves herself and her young son to a small Arizona town, hoping to establish a horse farm.



Shoah (1985) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

Expansive in its beauty as well as its mind-numbing horror, Shoah is a towering -- and utterly singular -- achievement in cinema.



Sherman's March (1985) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

Ross McElwee documents his march, akin to Admiral Sherman's, from North Carolina through the South, in search of true romance.



The Hit (1984) 

84% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

After kidnapping Parker, nothing goes as planned.



Love Streams (1984) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

Robert has several women staying at his place (research sources!



Places in the Heart (1984) 

96% of critics love it, but only 7,800 people have rated it.

Places in the Heart is a quiet character piece with grand ambitions that it more than fulfills, thanks to absorbing work from writer-director Robert Benton and a tremendous cast.



Secret Honor (1984) 

76% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

'Secret Honor' is a filmed version of Donald Freed and Arnold Stone's one-man play wherein the disgraced Richard M. Nixon ruminates over his failed career and suggests that he was really nothing more than the puppet of a sinister "committee" seeking global power.



A Soldier's Story (1984) 

90% of critics love it, but only 7,000 people have rated it.

The cast of A Soldier's Story features early supporting performances from several African-American actors who would go on to greater prominence, including Denzel Washington, David Alan Grier, and Robert Townsend.



The Times of Harvey Milk (1984) 

95% of critics love it, but only 4,500 people have rated it.

The most moving images depict the massive but reverential candlelight march that followed the shootings, a sharp contrast to the riots after White's infamous Twinkies-defense trial.



Danton (1983) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

Action opens in November of 1793, with Danton returning to Paris from his country retreat upon learning that the Committee for Public Safety, under Robespierre's incitement, has begun a series of massive executions, The Terror.



The Ballad of Narayama (1983) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,000 people have rated it.

This film is based on Shichiro Fukazawa's novel and is set in the 19th century in a severely impoverished mountain village in northern Japan.



Sans Soleil (1983) 

91% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

In this offering, French documentary filmmaker Chris Marker takes his cameras to Japan, demonstrating how industrialization and depersonalization often go hand in hand.



The Dresser (1983) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Set amidst WWII as the theatre troupe is touring the British Isles, the story unfolds episodically.



El Norte (1983) 

84% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

One of the first films to portray faithfully the plight of Central American political refugees, El Norte is a remarkable fusion of documentary realism and visual poetry.



Never Cry Wolf (1983) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,000 people have rated it.

Based on the autobiographical novel by Farley Mowat, Carroll Ballard's film chronicles the work of Tyler (Charles Martin Smith), a biologist who sets out alone on a government-sponsored mission to study the lives of Arctic wolves, an experience which ultimately becomes a journey of self-discovery as well.



Tender Mercies (1983) 

85% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

Mac Sledge (Robert Duvall), a once-famous country western singer, wakes up broke, alone and hung over in a tiny Texas motel run by widowed Rosa Lee (Tess Harper).



Under Fire (1983) 

88% of critics love it, but only 4,900 people have rated it.

This outrage (which actually occurred when journalist Bill Stewart was inhumanly shot by a Somoza soldier in full view of the video camera) soon makes global news and helps to hasten the overthrow of the corrupt dictatorship.



The Atomic Cafe (1982) 

95% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

This film recounts a defining period of 20th century history and serves as a chilling and often hilarious reminder of cold-war era paranoia in the United States--artfully presented through a collage of newsreel footage, government archives, military training films, and fifties music.



Burden of Dreams (1982) 

94% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

Documentary filmmaker Les Blank followed director Werner Herzog around during the stormy production of Herzog's Fitzcarraldo.



The Draughtsman's Contract (1982) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,400 people have rated it.

Mrs. Herbert's daughter (Ann Louise Lambert), in turn, seduces Neville -- her relationship with her husband Talman (Hugh Fraser) has become boring.



Frances (1982) 

68% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

Other actual personages depicted herein include Clifford Odets (played by Jeffrey DeMunn), Harold Clurman (Jordan Charney) and Ralph Edwards (Donald Craig).



My Favorite Year (1982) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,200 people have rated it.

It is 1954, and the larger-than-life, swahbuckling movie star Alan Swann is set to make his first television appearance on the hugely popular show, The Comedy Cavalcade.



White Dog (1982) 

92% of critics love it, but only 4,900 people have rated it.

Julie Sawyer (Kristy McNichol) hits a handsome white dog with her car one night and then nurses it back to health.



The Decline of Western Civilization (1981) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

The music of X, Circle Jerks, Fear and Black Flag are featured, however.



The Woman Next Door (1981) 

90% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

Francois Truffaut's The Woman Next Door continues his fascination with obsessive love.



Mephisto (1981) 

78% of critics love it, but only 5,500 people have rated it.

A Hungarian update of the Faustian legend, Istvan Szabo's Mephisto stars Klaus Maria Brandauer as Hendrik Hofgen, a successful theatrical performer who has grown bored with the accepted confines of the dramatic form.



Polyester (1981) 

89% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

Francine Fishpaw (Divine) is a housewife whose life has become a living hell.



Prince of the City (1981) 

91% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

Wired for sound, Williams almost immediately stumbles upon a police conspiracy to smuggle narcotics to informants in order to insure cooperation.



Vernon, Florida (1981) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

Many of them exhibit unusually close relationships to animals, including a turtle keeper, a worm farmer, and most memorably, an extremely enthusiastic turkey hunter.



Gloria (1980) 

91% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

The film won the Golden Lion Award at the 1980 Berlin Film Festival.



My Bodyguard (1980) 

85% of critics love it, but only 6,900 people have rated it.

T. Bill debuts as an affectionate director, keenly aware of growing pains.



The Stunt Man (1980) 

89% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

The Stunt Man is a preposterously entertaining thriller with a clever narrative and Oscar-worthy (nomination, at least!) Peter O'Toole performance.



Gregory's Girl (1980) 

93% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

In this charming and frequently hilarious comedy, an awkward Scottish schoolboy is hopelessly in love with the independent female goalie who replaced him on the school soccer team.



The Great Santini (1979) 

94% of critics love it, but only 4,000 people have rated it.

He drills his family unmercifully, like recruits.



The In-Laws (1979) 

90% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Dentist Sheldon Kornpett (Alan Arkin) is a respectable man.



A Little Romance (1979) 

69% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

The disarming comedy A Little Romance features Diane Lane as a 13-year-old American, living in Paris with her businessman stepfather (Arthur Hill) and her promiscuous mother (Sally Kellerman).



My Brilliant Career (1979) 

82% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

The film charts the developing self-awareness of Sybylla Melvyn (Judy Davis) as she grows from an insecure tomboy to a self-assured woman.



Norma Rae (1979) 

88% of critics love it, but only 8,000 people have rated it.

Norma Rae, a young Southern woman working at a cotton mill, encounters a union organizer and decides to join the effort to reform working conditions.



North Dallas Forty (1979) 

87% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Muddled overall, but perceptive and brutally realistic, North Dallas Forty also benefits from strong performances by Nick Nolte and Charles Durning. Football fans will likely find it fascinating.



Richard Pryor: Live in Concert (1979) 

90% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

Richard Pryor was one of the most influential comedians of the 1970s.



Wise Blood (1979) 

89% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

Set in the Deep South during the postwar era, Wise Blood stars Brad Dourif as an aimless veteran, who decides to become a Bible-thumping preacher (for a questionable concern called "The Church Wihout Christ") principally because he hasn't anything better lined up.



The Tree of Wooden Clogs (1978) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Tree of the Wooden Clogs was honored with the Golden Palm award at the Cannes Film Festival.



The Buddy Holly Story (1978) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,300 people have rated it.

Gary Busey's sterling performance as Buddy Holly graces this entertaining film biography of this pioneering rock and roll performer.



La Cage aux Folles (1978) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,400 people have rated it.

La Cage aux Folles is a fine French-Italian farce with flamboyant, charming characters and deep laughs.



Gates of Heaven (1978) 

89% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

The services shown herein are pet funerals.



Martin (1978) 

90% of critics love it, but only 7,800 people have rated it.

George A. Romero's contribution to vampire lore contains the expected gore and social satire -- but it's also surprisingly thoughtful, and boasts a whopper of a final act.



An Unmarried Woman (1978) 

89% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

Paul Mazursky's An Unmarried Woman follows the turmoil of a woman named Erica (Jill Clayburgh), whose comfortable domestic life is thrown into turmoil when her husband Martin (Michael Murphy) reveals over lunch that he is in love with another woman.



The Last Wave (1977) 

86% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

The stones resembled the one in Burton's recurring dream.



Opening Night (1977) 

91% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Opening Night is as dense and difficult as one would expect from John Cassavetes, but even the director's detractors will be unable to deny the power of Gena Rowlands' performance.



Master of the Flying Guillotine (1976) 

90% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

After many fights.



Bound for Glory (1976) 

85% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

Based on the autobiography of iconic folk singer Woody Guthrie, who wrote "This Land Is Your Land."



Harlan County U.S.A. (1976) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

This film chronicles the bitter and violent struggle waged by coal miners during a strike in 1973 in Eastern Kentucky against the Eastover Mining Company.



The Day of the Locust (1975) 

64% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

The story, unfolding via flashback, is told from the viewpoint of a noted art director and features a number of ugly incidents from behind-the-scenes Tinseltown.



Farewell, My Lovely (1975) 

84% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

This remake of the 1944 film, 'Murder, My Sweet,' also based on the Raymond Chandler novel, concerns private eye Philip Marlowe's attempts to locate Velma, a former dancer at a seedy nightclub and the girlfriend of Moose Malloy, a petty criminal just out of prison.



Fox and His Friends (1975) 

83% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

Fassbinder plays Franz Biberkopf, a financially poor gay man who performs in a traveling circus as Fox the Talking Head.



The Story of Adele H (1975) 

94% of critics love it, but only 5,100 people have rated it.

She conceals her identity and rents a room in a boarding house from Mrs. Saunders (Sylvia Marriott).



Jeanne Dielman, 23 Commerce Quay, 1080 Brussels (1975) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

In this experimental film about a middle-aged widow driven to desperation by the crushing boredom of making beds, cleaning bathtubs, cooking, dusting, and even just eating, the real-life time needed to make that bed or to cook is exactly the time used in the film -- an effect which makes some viewers just as bored and restless as the widow, and which brings home the point of the film quite well.



Night Moves (1975) 

82% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

Private eye Harry Moseby is hired by actress Arlene Iverson to locate her missing daughter Delly.



Overlord (1975) 

86% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Quiet Tom leaves home and enters the world of war in the British Army with its anxious days of marching and training and waiting only to meet his quick and violent death on the beaches at Normandy on D-Day, June 6, 1944.



The Sunshine Boys (1975) 

81% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

Thanks to the sparkling chemistry between its stars and Herbert Ross' gentle direction, this sweetly ambling comedy ranks among Neil Simon's finest screen adaptations.



The Travelling Players (1975) 

85% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

In 1952 a travelling actor's troupe roams the countryside performing a popular Greek pastoral play, which soon becomes a thinly disguised version of the "Oresteia."



Alice in the Cities (1974) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

Phillip takes Alice in hand on a trek across Germany to locate the girl's grandmother.



California Split (1974) 

92% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

With a free-flowing storyline, much improvisation, and a multi-channel soundtrack, filmmaker Robert Altman creates a challenging, not always successful portrait of two different gamblers united by their compulsion for gaming.



Celine and Julie Go Boating (1974) 

95% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

A story about story-telling, Jacques Rivette's self-referential classic centers on the fanciful world of two women literally lost in the stories they tell each other.



Harry and Tonto (1974) 

87% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

Accompanied by his pet, an aged cat named Tonto, Harry sets out upon an odyssey to Los Angeles.



Hearts and Minds (1974) 

89% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

A powerful, unflinching exploration of the Vietnam War, with first-person stories from both sides of the conflict, Hearts and Minds still hits the mark decades after its release.



Lancelot of the Lake (1974) 

94% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

This haunting drama from the brilliant French director Robert Bresson presents a disturbing, de-romanticized vision of the illustrious Lancelot and the Knights of the Round Table.



That's Entertainment! (1974) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

serenading Eleanor Powell from Easy to Love.



Thieves Like Us (1974) 

89% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

The film is a remake of They Live By Night, yet it is distinguished by Robert Altman's's distinctive, detailed characterizations.



Scenes from a Marriage (1974) 

88% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

Marianne and Johan always seemed like the perfect couple.



Bang the Drum Slowly (1973) 

91% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

Bang the Drum Slowly is a touching melodrama that explores the inner workings of a baseball club and its players' personalities with remarkable depth.



Coffy (1973) 

79% of critics love it, but only 8,400 people have rated it.

After her sister becomes a heroin addict, a nurse (Pam Grier) takes gun in hand and goes undercover to track down the dealers responsible for her sister's condition.



The Friends of Eddie Coyle (1973) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

The Friends of Eddie Coyle sees Robert Mitchum in transformative late-career mode in a gritty and credible character study.



O Lucky Man! (1973) 

82% of critics love it, but only 5,500 people have rated it.

al.)



The Paper Chase (1973) 

84% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

This filmization of John Jay Osborn Jr.'s novel Paper Chase ended up one of the surprise hits of the 1973-74 movie season.



Belladonna of Sadness (1973) 

86% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

Belladonna of Sadness has more than enough brilliant visual artistry to keep audiences enraptured even as the film's narrative reach slightly exceeds its grasp.



The Merchant of Four Seasons (1972) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

He turns Hans' business around and enlivens his home life.



1776 (1972) 

68% of critics love it, but only 7,700 people have rated it.

With the Boston Harbor still stained from over-taxed British tea, a revolution is brewing in the colonies!



Chloe in the Afternoon (1972) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

Eric Rohmer's Chloe in the Afternoon doesn't need sparkly cinematic dross to discover unspoken, universal truths about relationships and love through filmmaking.



The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant (1972) 

86% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

Petra Von Kant (Margit Carstensen) is a fashion designer.



The Candidate (1972) 

89% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

The Candidate may not get all the details right when it comes to modern campaigning, but it captures political absurdity perfectly -- and boasts typically stellar work from Robert Redford to boot.



Fat City (1972) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

Fat City is a bleak, mordant, slice of life boxing drama that doesn't pull its punches.



Sounder (1972) 

88% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

After suffering months of poverty, the father (Paul Winfield) steals in order to support his family.



The Harder They Come (1972) 

89% of critics love it, but only 5,100 people have rated it.

This gritty, groundbreaking film brought reggae music to the international stage, made Jimmy Cliff a star worldwide.



A Touch of Zen (1971) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

According to this drama, set in 14th-century China, a state-run secret police organization made life a living hell for anyone with the temerity to cross it.



Carnal Knowledge (1971) 

88% of critics love it, but only 7,500 people have rated it.

With a script by satirist and cartoonist Jules Feiffer, Mike Nichols's Carnal Knowledge (1971) ruthlessly exposed the damage wrought by pre-1960s sexual mores.



Minnie and Moskowitz (1971) 

78% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

The disparate duo meet in his lot.



A New Leaf (1971) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

Indigent playboy Graham (Walter Matthau), who has squandered his inherited trust fund and needs to get a new source of money, begins to ply his affections upon Henrietta.



Murmur of the Heart (1971) 

90% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Father: Daniel Gelin.



Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971) 

92% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

This critically well-received movie was unexpectedly successful at the box office.



Two-Lane Blacktop (1971) 

94% of critics love it, but only 7,800 people have rated it.

The surface story is a quixotic cross country road race between dapper sociopath playboy Warren Oates driving a showroom GTO and ultra-laconic proto-grunge hippie gearheads James Taylor and Dennis Wilson behind the wheel of their primer gray souped-up '55 Chevy.



The Honeymoon Killers (1970) 

94% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

Martha Beck (Shirley Stoler) is a lonely nurse who takes care of her invalid mother in Mobile, Alabama.



The Boys in the Band (1970) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

closet case, and one midnight cowboy party favor gather in a Greenwich Village apartment for the birthday of self-described "ugly, pockmarked Jew fairy" Leonard Frey (later Motel the Tailor in Fiddler on the Roof) but nasty host Kenneth Nelson insists on playing those truth games.



The Garden of the Finzi-Continis (1970) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

The film won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Film, and boasts terrific performances by Helmut Berger and Dominique Sanda.



Gimme Shelter (1970) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,900 people have rated it.

The original rude boys of British rock, The Rolling Stones, tour America, culminating in a death at Altamont.



Deep End (1970) 

89% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

Set at the fag-end of the '60s in a decidedly unglamorous and unswinging London (though actually filmed, very persuasively, in Hamburg), Skolimowski's pleasingly skewed variation on the coming-of-age sex comedy posits a bizarre, totally unsentimental education for its adolescent protagonist (Moulder-Brown), a somewhat naive school-leaver newly employed at a run-down swimming baths and obsessively pining for a colleague (Asher).



Performance (1970) 

84% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

This psychological crime thriller finds Chas (James Fox) as a crook on the run from the law.



The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1970) 

92% of critics love it, but only 6,400 people have rated it.

'Private Life' is both an elegiac evocation of late Victorian England and a boldly modern take on the dark side of the "real" Sherlock Holmes.



Scrooge (1970) 

75% of critics love it, but only 8,400 people have rated it.

Scrooge feels compassion for Tiny Tim (Richard Beaumont), the crippled but hopeful son of his underpaid and overworked bookkeeper Bob Crachit (David Collings).



Tristana (1970) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

She runs away from Lope with a young artist named Horacio.



Valerie and Her Week of Wonders (1970) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

In this surreal psychological fantasy, young Valerie lives with her grandmother.



Funeral Parade of Roses (1969) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

This violent dramatic bloodbath concerns a love triangle in a gay bar in Tokyo.



A Boy Named Charlie Brown (1969) 

94% of critics love it, but only 4,000 people have rated it.

The story centers on a national spelling bee.



My Night at Maud's (1969) 

94% of critics love it, but only 6,400 people have rated it.

The "my" in My Night At Maud's belongs to the protagonist played by Jean-Louis Trintignant, a Catholic engineer whose struggle with his faith is renewed when he falls instantly in love with a woman he's never met (Marie-Christine Barrault) while attending mass.



Medium Cool (1969) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

"I love to shoot film" is the sanguine motto of TV lensman John Cassellis (Robert Forster) in Haskell Wexler's 1969 Medium Cool, a semi-documentary investigation of image-making and politics.



Oh! What a Lovely War (1969) 

76% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

The awesome all-star cast includes Laurence Olivier, Ralph Richardson, Maggie Smith, John Gielgud, Michael Redgrave, Jack Hawkins, John Mills, Susannah York, Dirk Bogarde and Phyllis Calvert.



Salesman (1969) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

It follows the mishaps of door-to-door Bible salesmen.



Mississippi Mermaid (1969) 

86% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

The two are soon married and Louis takes ill soon thereafter.



Women in Love (1969) 

88% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

Both couples honeymoon together as love takes it's often rocky course.



Stolen Kisses (1968) 

95% of critics love it, but only 8,000 people have rated it.

Stolen Kisses is a fine feature follow-up to The 400 Blows, transforming Antoine Doinel into a sympathetic, silly, and romantic figure that carries to the series' end.



The Devil Rides Out (1968) 

93% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

Dennis Wheatley's black magic novel becomes a Hammer horror movie, with Christopher Lee for once in the role of the good guy playing the Duc De Richleau, an authority on the occult who must battle a group of Satanists for the soul of his friend.



Faces (1968) 

85% of critics love it, but only 6,800 people have rated it.

Richard leaves his sexually unresponsive wife Maria to cavort with a prostitute.



Petulia (1968) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

Petulia's forward nature and desperate tenderness betray her fear of her sullen, abusive, pretty-boy husband (Richard Chamberlain).



The Swimmer (1968) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

In this film, Burt Lancaster plays a wealthy, middle-aged advertising man, who embarks on a revelatory journey through suburban Connecticut.



Targets (1968) 

88% of critics love it, but only 5,100 people have rated it.

A startling directorial debut by Peter Bogdanovich mixes an homage to Boris Karloff horror films with a timely sniper story to create a thriller with modern baggage and old school shock and awe.



Monterey Pop (1968) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

With his characteristic verite style, D. A. Pennebaker captured it all, immortalizing moments that have become legend: Pete Townshend destroying his guitar, Jimi Hendrix burning his



Kuroneko (1968) 

95% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

Two women are raped and killed by renegade samurai warriors.



Marat/Sade (1967) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,100 people have rated it.

Film debut of Glenda Jackson.



Accident (1967) 

85% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

A film arguably ahead of its time, Accident boasts strong performances to match its thought-provoking themes.



The Taming of the Shrew (1967) 

85% of critics love it, but only 7,100 people have rated it.

It may not be reverent enough for purists, but This Taming of the Shrew is too funny -- and fun -- for the rest of us to resist.



La Chinoise (1967) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

Director Jean-Luc Godard, whose advocacy of Maoism bordered on intoxication, infuriated many traditionalist critics with his swiftly paced satire La Chinoise.



Far from the Madding Crowd (1967) 

72% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

Julie Christie plays Bathsheba Everdene, a country heiress who is loved by three different men: Terence Stamp, Peter Finch and Alan Bates.



Hombre (1967) 

92% of critics love it, but only 6,800 people have rated it.

When the passengers fight back, Boone takes Rush as a hostage.



The Firemen's Ball (1967) 

90% of critics love it, but only 5,000 people have rated it.

Other critics simply accepted the film as the slapsticky tale of a disastrous small-town celebration in honor of a retiring fire chief, and laughed accordingly.



Branded to Kill (1967) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

"No.



Mouchette (1967) 

87% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

Remarkable not only as a viewing experience, but as a showcase for Robert Bresson's tremendous skill, Mouchette underpins its grim narrative with devastating grace.



The President's Analyst (1967) 

80% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

When Coburn becomes expendable, he finds a pair of strong allies in the form of likeable political assassin Godfrey Cambridge and gay Soviet spy Severn Darden.



Voyna i mir III: 1812 god (1967) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

Epic adaptation of Tolstoy's novel centers around the lives of two families during Napoleon's 1812 invasion of Russia.



The Young Girls of Rochefort (1967) 

97% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

The Young Girls of Rochefort pays colorful homage to classic Hollywood musicals while earning its own emotionally affecting place of honor in the genre.



Marketa Lazarová (1967) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

Director Frantisek Vlacil spares us nothing in bringing the Vancura novel to the screen, not even a gruesomely convincing public beheading.



Born Free (1966) 

93% of critics love it, but only 7,000 people have rated it.

Joy and George Adamson (portrayed by real-life married couple Virginia McKenna and Bill Travers) involuntarily domesticate several lions while living in Kenya.



The Endless Summer (1966) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,100 people have rated it.

The Endless Summer also features a great surf-rock score by the Sandals.



A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1966) 

83% of critics love it, but only 8,500 people have rated it.

The plot is way too complex to fully detail here, though we can note that it hinges on the fact that three suburban Roman houses are next door to one another.



Closely Watched Trains (1966) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,200 people have rated it.

He undergoes several philosophical changes as he becomes attracted to the Czech underground.



King of Hearts (1966) 

93% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

During World War I, Scottish soldier Private Plumpick (Academy Award (R) Nominee, Alan Bates) is sent on a mission to a village in the French countryside to disarm a bomb set by the retreating German army.



Chimes at Midnight (1965) 

97% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

In this memorable adaptation of Shakespeare's Henry IV, Parts 1 and 2, the friendship between the rogue Falstaff and the wild Prince Hal is fated to end when the young man gives up his dissolute life and assumes the throne England after the death of his father, King Henry IV.



The Collector (1965) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,600 people have rated it.

A neurotic recluse whose only pleasure is butterfly collecting, Clegg wins $200,000 in the British Football Pool.



Juliet of the Spirits (1965) 

81% of critics love it, but only 8,200 people have rated it.

But Giulietta is too reliant on her husband's approval to succumb to hedonism.



The Shop on Main Street (1965) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

The 1965 Oscar winner for Best Foreign Film, The Shop on Main Street (Obch o Na Korze) stars Josef Kroner as Tono Briko, a slothful Slovakian carpenter.



Tokyo Olympiad (1965) 

100% of critics love it, but only 800 people have rated it.

Originally released at nearly three hours, Tokyo Olympiad was shamelessly edited for U.S. release to half that length, with insipid narration added.



Before the Revolution (1964) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

They begin a love affair after Agostino's funeral, then Gina confuses Fabrizio by sleeping with a stranger.



Charulata (1964) 

96% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

She is neglected by her busy husband, Bhupati (Shailen Mukherjee), a politically active newspaper publisher.



Gertrud (1964) 

78% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

Though initial critical reaction to the film was largely unfavorable, its reputation has steadily grown, especially considered in the context of Dreyer's long career.



The Killers (1964) 

78% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

Though it can't best Robert Siodmak's classic 1946 version, Don Siegel's take on the Ernest Hemingway story stakes out its own violent territory, and offers a terrifically tough turn from Lee Marvin.



The Naked Kiss (1964) 

92% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

She falls in love with Grant (Michael Dante), the town's philanthropist and most eligible bachelor, but a sinister secret he's hiding mars their chance for a happy ending.



Nothing But a Man (1964) 

95% of critics love it, but only 900 people have rated it.

Duff, an itinerant black railroad laborer (Ivan Dixon), romances and marries Josie, a small-town preacher's daughter (Abbey Lincoln).



The Pumpkin Eater (1964) 

63% of critics love it, but only 1,000 people have rated it.

Anne Bancroft stars as a restless, twice-married British woman with six children, whose third husband is a fledgling screenwriter (Peter Finch).



Topkapi (1964) 

90% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

Sexy Melina Mercouri (Mrs. Dassin) is probably the best of the batch: the others are faffling Robert Morley, unreliable Gilles Segal and Jess Hahn.



The Gospel According to St. Matthew (1964) 

94% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

Relating his facts in straight-on documentary fashion, Pier Paolo Pasolini's 1964 Biblical film stars Enrique Irazoqui as Jesus.



Le Doulos (1963) 

96% of critics love it, but only 5,000 people have rated it.

Confusion and wrong assumptions are the cause of tragedy in this stylish gangster noir by director Jean-Pierre Melville.



Billy Liar (1963) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

He takes comfort in an understanding girl named Liz (Julie Christie).



Le joli mai (1963) 

91% of critics love it, but only 400 people have rated it.

Comments range from the French-Algerian conflict and the stock market to everyday problems of housing, homelessness, working conditions and moral and religious observations.



Lilies of the Field (1963) 

90% of critics love it, but only 6,800 people have rated it.

In this film, a traveling laborer meets five nuns in the Arizona desert.



Muriel, or the Time of Return (1963) 

90% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

A middle aged widow tries to relive her past by inviting an old lover to visit her.



The Servant (1963) 

88% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

Wealthy wastrel James Fox hires insouciant cockney Dirk Bogarde as a valet.



Shock Corridor (1963) 

93% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

The late Sam Fuller's feral nightmare about a gung-ho reporter seeking his Pulitizer story inside a mental institution.



This Sporting Life (1963) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

Appropriately hard-hitting on narrative as well as physical levels, The Sporting Life remains a British "kitchen sink" classic that's beautiful to look at and leaves a lingering mark.



Salvatore Giuliano (1962) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

The film was shot entirely in Sicily and utilized local non-professional actors as well as professional actors.



Advise & Consent (1962) 

81% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

Among the participants are veteran Dixiecrat Charles Laughton, freshman Senator Don Murray and powerseeker George Grizzard.



The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1962) 

70% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

Dry and full of angst, this British New Wave classic features potent social commentary and a star making performance by Tom Courtenay as a textbook example of the "angry young man."



Lonely Are the Brave (1962) 

90% of critics love it, but only 4,000 people have rated it.

David Miller helmed screenwriter Dalton Trumbo's mournful masterpiece, a hymn to rugged individualism and freedom slowly being strangled to death by voracious urban development.



Long Day's Journey Into Night (1962) 

93% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

Set in 1912 New England, the story takes place in the summer home of aging actor James Tyrone (Ralph Richardson) and his family.



Mafioso (1962) 

96% of critics love it, but only 1,300 people have rated it.

Mafioso begins as an amusing farce and skillfully transforms into a portentous social drama.



Mamma Roma (1962) 

92% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

This proves impossible when the past keeps rearing its ugly head in the form of Mamma Rosa's previous "johns."



Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

An excellent production with one of Quinn's best performances, ably assisted by Rooney and Gleason.



An Autumn Afternoon (1962) 

95% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

Three elderly men discuss the problem of an aging friend's grown, unmarried daughter.



The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

Characteristically breaking with tradition, director Robert Bresson presents a realistic, unique view of the life and death of Joan of Arc.



Lola (1961) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

Marc Michel makes a reference to his unrequited love towards Lola when he reappears in Demy's The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (1964).



A Raisin in the Sun (1961) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,400 people have rated it.

His wife Ruth (Ruby Dee) takes in laundry to help make ends meet and watches over their son.



A Taste of Honey (1961) 

88% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

Jo is the neglected 16-year-old daughter whose promiscuous mother marries a dandy.



Victim (1961) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

Further elevated by a strong central performance from Dirk Bogarde, Victim offers an eloquent and emotionally affecting argument against prejudice.



Divorce Italian Style (1961) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,300 people have rated it.

While Italian Catholic law prohibits divorce, murder is only punishable by a short jail sentence if it was done to restore family honor.



Classe Tous Risques (1960) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Gangster Abel Davos (Lino Ventura) is wanted for murder in France, and has been living underground in Italy for ten years.



Elmer Gantry (1960) 

96% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

Elmer Gantry (Burt Lancaster), a drunken, dishonest street preacher allegedly patterned on Billy Sunday, wrangles a job with the travelling tent ministry conducted by Sister Sharon Falconer (Jean Simmons).



Mughal-E-Azam (1960) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

Jalaluddin Akbar was a lover of Hindustan and his son Salim loved a frightened little palace main, Anarkali.



Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1960) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,900 people have rated it.

A movie chuck full of steamy sex, stevedore language and electric-charged emotions, there is minimal plot line to grab hold of, but more than enough meat to the movie to make it stay in mind.



Wild River (1960) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

Some dated fuzzy-headed liberalism aside, Wild River is a masterful recreation of a difficult, complex period in American history.



Zazie dans le Métro (1960) 

86% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

The lighthearted comedy Zazie Dans Le Metro, an early directorial effort from Louis Malle, stars Catherine Demongeot as a 12-year-old girl named Zazie.



Look Back in Anger (1959) 

91% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

Alison's best friend Helena Charles (Claire Bloom) advises Alison to escape her injurious marriage.



Nazarin (1959) 

84% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

"A masterpiece that reveals the human condition and shows us a way to surpass it.



The World of Apu (1959) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

Achingly poignant, beautifully shot, and evocatively atmospheric, The World of Apu closes out Satyajit Ray's classic trilogy on a high note.



Ballad of a Soldier (1959) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,600 people have rated it.

A young Russian soldier is awarded a four day pass after destroying two enemy tanks.



Les Cousins (1959) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,100 people have rated it.

In various guises, Charles and Paul would reappear in virtually every subsequent Chabrol-directed domestic drama.



The Hound of the Baskervilles (1959) 

93% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

This film is the first color feature of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's legendary sleuth.



Jazz on a Summer's Day (1959) 

100% of critics love it, but only 700 people have rated it.

An incredible collection of classic live performances, Jazz on a Summer''s Day captures Louis Armstrong, Thelonious Monk, Chuck Berry, Mahalia Jackson, and many others performing at the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival.



The Mouse That Roared (1959) 

89% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

In this film, the tiny country of Grand Fenwick faces economic ruin when their chief export of wine loses out to a California vintage.



Fires on the Plain (1959) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

One group of men harbors a soldier named Tamura (Eiji Funakoshi) suffering from the last stages of tuberculosis.



The Nun's Story (1959) 

93% of critics love it, but only 6,800 people have rated it.

Though frequently disillusioned in her efforts to spread good will -- at one point she is nearly killed by a mental patient (Colleen Dewhurst) -- Sister Luke perseveres.



Black Orpheus (1959) 

89% of critics love it, but only 7,200 people have rated it.

Colorful, atmospheric, and infections, Black Orpheus takes an ancient tale and makes it fresh anew, thanks in part to its bewitching bossa nova soundtrack.



Room at the Top (1959) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

Ruthless young working-class Englishman Laurence Harvey takes a job in a North Country village controlled by millionaire Donald Wolfit.



Floating Weeds (1959) 

95% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

Floating Weeds boasts the visual beauty and deep tenderness of director Yasujiro Ozu's most memorable films -- and it's one of the few the master shot in color.



Our Man in Havana (1959) 

86% of critics love it, but only 2,800 people have rated it.

Graham Greene wrote this witty comedy inspired by Cold War paranoia.



Auntie Mame (1958) 

92% of critics love it, but only 8,600 people have rated it.

Auntie Mame began as a novel by Patrick Dennis (aka Ed Fitzgerald), then was adapted into a long-running Broadway play by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee.



The Horse's Mouth (1958) 

92% of critics love it, but only 2,000 people have rated it.

The painting is completed and promptly destroyed.



I Want to Live! (1958) 

92% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

However, the film belongs to Susan Hayward who gives a intense, shattering performance without one false note.



The Music Room (1958) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

Released shortly before his Apu trilogy, this is felt to be one of Satyaijt Ray's finest productions.



The Long, Hot Summer (1958) 

87% of critics love it, but only 7,300 people have rated it.

In time, Will gets the idea that Quick might be a good match for his daughter Clara (Joanne Woodward) and a better choice to take over his business dealings than Jody.



Man of the West (1958) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

In this western, Link Jones travels to Fort Worth to hire a new schoolteacher there.



Ashes and Diamonds (1958) 

95% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

Two men are hired to kill a top Communist official in the aftermath of World War II.



Separate Tables (1958) 

71% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

Among the guests are an alleged war hero (David Niven), a timid spinster (Deborah Kerr) and her domineering mother (Gladys Cooper), and a divorced couple (Burt Lancaster, Rita Hayworth) trying to re-ignite their romance despite the presence of his mistress (Wendy Hiller).



Shadows (1958) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

Shadows was John Cassavetes' first directorial effort.



Forty Guns (1957) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

The story centers on Barbara Stanwyck who plays a powerful female landowner who basically runs an entire Arizona county with an iron fist.



Curse of the Demon (1957) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,000 people have rated it.

In this film, American Professor Dana Andrews investigates a devil-worshipping cult active in England.



The Three Faces of Eve (1957) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Ironically, Joanne Woodward would herself play a psychologist confronted with a multiple-personality case in the Emmy-winning 1976 TV movie Sybil.



Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? (1957) 

90% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Director Frank Tashlin uses Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter as an excuse to take satirical potshots at everything from TV commercials to the unwieldiness of CinemaScope.



Bob le Flambeur (1956) 

96% of critics love it, but only 7,000 people have rated it.

Majorly stylish, Bob le Flambeur is a cool homage to American gangster films and the presage to French New Wave mode of seeing.



Aparajito (1956) 

94% of critics love it, but only 6,000 people have rated it.

The film also features a musical score by Ravi Shankar.



Baby Doll (1956) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

Enter crafty Sicilian Eli Wallach (who, like supporting actor Rip Torn, makes his film debut herein), who covets both Malden's wife and business.



Bigger Than Life (1956) 

92% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

A seriously ill schoolteacher becomes dependent on a "miracle" drug that begins to affect his sanity.



The Burmese Harp (1956) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

The film is also known as Burmese Harp.



The Harder They Fall (1956) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

This offering is one of the finest boxing films ever made, following a sportswriter who suffers a number of moral dilemmas as he agrees to promote a fixed fight.



While the City Sleeps (1956) 

88% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

This leads to a great deal of infighting amongst Price's reporters, especially cynical journalist Dana Andrews, photographer James Craig, "sob sister" Ida Lupino, and wire service chief George Sanders.



Written on the Wind (1956) 

81% of critics love it, but only 6,000 people have rated it.

Rock Hudson falls in love with Stack's nymphomaniac sister Dorothy Malone.



French Cancan (1955) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

The film is also title Only the French Can.



Le Amiche (1955) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

The fine supporting cast includes Valentina Cortese, Yvonne Furneaux, and Franco Fabrizi.



Blackboard Jungle (1955) 

75% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

This gritty, unflinching film centers on Richard Dadier, a war vet who gets a job teaching in a tough inner-city school.



Lola Montès (1955) 

83% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

Max Ophuls' final film (and his only movie in color) is a cinematic tour-de-force masquerading as a biography, in this case a dazzling fictionalized life of the notorious 19th century dancer, actress, and courtesan.



The Man with the Golden Arm (1955) 

85% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

Based on the novel by Nelson Algren, the film stars Frank Sinatra as Frankie Machine, expert card dealer (hence the title).



Summertime (1955) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,200 people have rated it.

In this romantic drama a Yankee secretary goes on a Venetian vacation and ends up falling in love with a handsome native.



Touchez Pas au Grisbi (1954) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

This strangely-christened French film noir was released in the U.S. as Grisbi.



Hobson's Choice (1954) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

The winner of the British Film Institute "Best Film" award of 1954, Hobson's Choice chalked up another international success for director David Lean.



Magnificent Obsession (1954) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

The dead man's wife, Jane Wyman, refuses to accept Hudson's apologies.



Salt of the Earth (1954) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

With the exception of five actors (including future Waltons star Will Geer), the cast is comprised of non-professionals, mostly participants of the real-life strike action upon which the film is based.



Senso (1954) 

85% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

Against the backdrop of the Italian-Austrian war of unification, troubled Countess Livia Serpieri (Alida Valli) betrays her country for the love of an Austrian rogue, Lieutenant Franz Mahler (Farley Granger).



The Naked Spur (1953) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,500 people have rated it.

His first quarry is fugitive killer Robert Ryan.



The Band Wagon (1953) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

A lavish, enduring backstage musical from Vincente Minnelli, The Band Wagon tells the tale of Tony Hunter (Fred Astaire who was 54 at the time) a multi-talented but aging movie star who heads for the Great White Way in hopes of bolstering his flagging career.



Julius Caesar (1953) 

95% of critics love it, but only 7,100 people have rated it.

Joseph L. Mankiewicz directed this exquisite version of William Shakespeare's play.



Little Fugitive (1953) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

A boy from Brooklyn, wrongly led to believe that he killed another child with his rifle by an 'ornery older brother, flees to the fantasy and fun of Coney Island to escape in this all-but forgotten drama that proves that big budgets and studios are not always needed to create a memorable, internationally distinguished gem.



The Earrings of Madame De... (1953) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

Ophüls' graceful camerawork and visual portrayal of luxury and loss make Earrings a powerful French drama.



Summer with Monika (1953) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

But when the couple returns home, their clashing personalities drive them apart.



Casque d'Or (1952) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

Georges Manda (Serge Reggiani), an honest woodworker, falls in love with Marie (Simone Signoret), the "moll" of minor crook Roland (William Sabatier).



Clash by Night (1952) 

73% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Desperate for security and happiness, Barbara Stanwyck enters into a loveless marriage with cloddish but likeable fisherman Paul Douglas.



The Importance of Being Earnest (1952) 

88% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

Jack is also in love with Algernon's attractive cousin Gwendolen (Joan Greenwood).



The Lusty Men (1952) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

Complications arise when Mitchum falls hard for Kennedy's wife.



Pat and Mike (1952) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy take competition to a romantic-comic highpoint in this elegantly directed sports comedy by George Cukor.



The Browning Version (1951) 

88% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

The film's rich montage of incident and character detail builds to intense emotional heights that make this version of +The Browning Version a classic.



On Dangerous Ground (1951) 

93% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

The film includes a memorable score by Alfred Hitchcock favorite Bernard Herrmann.



The Steel Helmet (1951) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

One of the greatest war films ever made, this film still retains considerable power when compared with today's more explicit offerings.



The Tales of Hoffmann (1951) 

85% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

An anthology of fantastic and romantic adventures, recounted by the fableist Hoffmann (Robert Rounseville) and featuring Moira Shearer (The Red Shoes), Ludmilla Tcherina, and Ann Ayars.



The Man in the White Suit (1951) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,800 people have rated it.

His textile mill bosses discover his secret experiments and initially ban him from their laboratories.



Born Yesterday (1950) 

95% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

In this adaptation of Garson Kanin's Broadway hit, Judy Holliday stars as Billie Dawn, a strident ex-chorus girl who is the mistress of junk tycoon Harry Brock.



Panic in the Streets (1950) 

95% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

The carrier was an illegal alien, murdered by criminals Jack Palance and Zero Mostel.



Where the Sidewalk Ends (1950) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,000 people have rated it.

In disposing of the body, Dixon inadvertently places the blame for the killing on cab driver Jiggs Taylor (Tom Tully).



Champion (1949) 

91% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

He wins his early fights with ease and eventually becomes champion of the world.



A Letter to Three Wives (1949) 

94% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

Thelma Ritter shows up in a hilarious unbilled bit as a slatternly domestic, while an equally uncredited Carl "Alfalfa" Switzer makes a quick entrance and exit as a bellhop.



Passport to Pimlico (1949) 

92% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

Passport to Pimlico is one of the most charmingly whimsical Ealing Studios comedies of the late 1940s-early 1950s.



Whisky Galore (1949) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

The tiny Scots Island of Todday suffers from a wartime whisky shortage.



D.O.A. (1949) 

87% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

Frank Bigelow (Edmond O'Brien), a certified public accountant, goes on vacation in San Francisco.



Brighton Rock (1948) 

94% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

Pinky, the psychotic, razor-toting gang leader, romances and marries a teenage waitress in order to keep her silent about one of his nefarious crimes.



Germany Year Zero (1948) 

95% of critics love it, but only 5,500 people have rated it.

An early masterpiece from director Roberto Rossellini, Germany Year Zero plunges viewers into real-life horror.



Call Northside 777 (1948) 

73% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

This drama was based upon the true story of journalist Jim McGuire and wrongly convicted prisoner Joe Majczek.



Easter Parade (1948) 

90% of critics love it, but only 8,300 people have rated it.

A nightclub performer hires a naive chorus girl to become his new dance partner to make his former partner jealous and to prove he can make any partner a star.



The Fallen Idol (1948) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

Young Bobby Henrey idolizes household butler Ralph Richardson.



Force of Evil (1948) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

Joe Morse wants to consolidate all the small-time numbers racket operators into a single powerful organization.



I Remember Mama (1948) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

The film is narrated by Mama's daughter Katrin (Barbara Bel Geddes), recalling the trials and tribulations of her family in turn-of-the-century San Francisco.



Letter from an Unknown Woman (1948) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,000 people have rated it.

Golden Age Hollywood romance doesn't get much better than Letter From an Unknown Woman, a powerful tale of doomed love.



Macbeth (1948) 

88% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

This haunting, eccentric Macbeth may be hampered by budget constraints, but Orson Welles delivers both behind and in front of the camera.



Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (1948) 

82% of critics love it, but only 8,300 people have rated it.

With Loy and Douglas in supporting roles, its family entertainment with the classic Grant style.



Portrait of Jennie (1948) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,700 people have rated it.

In this film, Joseph Cotten plays an artist who meets an intriguing schoolgirl named Jennie.



They Live by Night (1948) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

"This boy



Unfaithfully Yours (1948) 

93% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

Preston Sturges' Unfaithfully Yours is a typically witty and wild screwball comedy starring Rex Harrison as a symphony conductor named Alfred de Carter who is convinced his wife (Linda Darnell) is having an affair.



Drunken Angel (1948) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

A drunken doctor with a hot temper and a violence-prone gangster with tuberculosis form a quicksilver bond.



Spring in a Small Town (1948) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,400 people have rated it.

The heroine Wei Wei (Zhou Yuwen) is married to a VIP landowner who seems to be suffering from severe depression.



Body and Soul (1947) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

The cinematography is also exceptional.



Crossfire (1947) 

80% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Because of the film's subtext of prejudice and anti-Semitism, filmmaker Edward Dmytryk became one of the first 10 Hollywood figures blacklisted by McCarthy's House Committee on Un-American Activities.



Kiss of Death (1947) 

86% of critics love it, but only 4,000 people have rated it.

To make matters even more complicated, Louie soon comes calling and pressures Nick into testifying against Tommy.



Record of a Tenement Gentleman (1947) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,100 people have rated it.

In this classic shomin-geki ("story of middle-class life"), Ozu relates the slightly comic tale of a boy abandoned by his parents in postwar Japan.



Nightmare Alley (1947) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

Nightmare Alley is the story of a con man who recruits a couple of amatuers as his partners.



Odd Man Out (1947) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

Meanwhile, a vast police manhunt is launched -- a net that closes steadily, remorselessly in upon him.



Green for Danger (1946) 

76% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

At a World War II emergency hospital, a postman dies under anesthetic during a relatively minor operation.



The Spiral Staircase (1946) 

85% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

Spiral Staircase is a thriller about a mute servant (Dorothy McGuire) who works in an spooky mansion that may house a killer who has been murdering women who have physical deformities.



The Yearling (1946) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

Claude Jarman Jr. plays Jody Baxter, the lonely son of just-getting-by farmers Pa and Ma Baxter (Gregory Peck and Jane Wyman).



The Bells of St. Mary's (1945) 

94% of critics love it, but only 6,600 people have rated it.

In this follow-up to Going My Way (1944), Bing Crosby repeats his Oscar-winning characterization of happy-go-lucky priest Father O'Malley.



Christmas in Connecticut (1945) 

87% of critics love it, but only 4,900 people have rated it.

This solves everything, right?



Dead of Night (1945) 

96% of critics love it, but only 6,200 people have rated it.

With four accomplished directors contributing, Dead of Night is a classic horror anthology that remains highly influential.



Leave Her to Heaven (1945) 

90% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

She dismisses the local handyman and then drowns his crippled half-brother Danny (Darryl Hickman).



The Southerner (1945) 

90% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

Director Jean Renoir also wrote the script for The Southerner--in fluent English rather than French, as mental exercise.



A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1945) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,500 people have rated it.

The story is told from the point of view of daughter Peggy Ann Garner, a clear-eyed realist who nonetheless would like to believe in her pie-in-the-sky father, whom she loves,



Blithe Spirit (1945) 

75% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

Rex Harrison plays a novelist, newly married to straight-laced Constance Cummings.



Going My Way (1944) 

78% of critics love it, but only 7,300 people have rated it.

Bing Crosby and Barry Fitzgerald are eminently likable, and film is pleasantly sentimental, but Going My Way suffers from a surplus of sweetness.



Hail the Conquering Hero (1944) 

94% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

In this film, Eddie Bracken plays the son of a WWI Marine hero who is the first in his small town to sign up for military service.



Ministry of Fear (1944) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Lang's famous expressionistic style is somewhat muted here, but Henry Sharp's crisp black-and-white cinematography sets a suitably unsettling mood, and the twists and double-crosses of Greene's story unfold at an appropriately quick pace.



National Velvet (1944) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,800 people have rated it.

National Velvet makes the most of a breakout performance from Elizabeth Taylor, delivering a timeless family-friendly tearjerker that avoids straying into the sentimental.



This Happy Breed (1944) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,500 people have rated it.

This was the second of four collaborations between author Noel Coward and director David Lean.



The Uninvited (1944) 

94% of critics love it, but only 5,400 people have rated it.

Once the film's deep dark secret is revealed (courtesy of a virtuoso "mad speech" by supporting actress Cornelia Otis Skinner), Roderick is able to single-handedly exorcise the estate and claim Stella as his bride.



Ossessione (1943) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

Memorable adaptation of James M. Cain's The Postman Always Rings Twice to the milieu of early-1940s Italy.



Five Graves to Cairo (1943) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

Protagonist John J. Bramble (Franchot Tone) is stranded in the Sahara, the lone survivor of a British tank crew.



Hangmen Also Die! (1943) 

83% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Czech loyalist Brian Donlevy assassinates the vicious Gestapo leader Heydrich, then goes into hiding.



Heaven Can Wait (1943) 

91% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

At 21, Henry elopes with lovely Martha Strabel (Gene Tierney) stealing her away from her stuffy fiance Albert Van Cleve (Allyn Joslyn), Henry's cousin.



I Walked with a Zombie (1943) 

92% of critics love it, but only 7,100 people have rated it.

Evocative direction by Jacques Tourneur collides with the low-rent production values of exploitateer Val Lewton in I Walked with a Zombie, a sultry sleeper that's simultaneously smarmy, eloquent and fascinating.



Lassie Come Home (1943) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,200 people have rated it.

Based on the novel by Eric Knight (originally serialized in The Saturday Evening Post), Lassie Come Home was released quite some time after Knight's death.



The More the Merrier (1943) 

94% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

This is why elderly Benjamin Dingle (Charles Coburn) is obliged to share a tiny DC apartment with pretty Connie Milligan (Jean Arthur) and handsome Joe Carter (Joel McCrea).



Jane Eyre (1943) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,300 people have rated it.

But Jane's employer, the brooding, tormented Edward Rochester (Orson Welles), terrifies the prim young governess.



The Miracle of Morgan's Creek (1943) 

88% of critics love it, but only 4,500 people have rated it.

The Miracle of Morgan's Creek finds director Preston Sturges at his most zanily subversive -- not to mention hilarious.



I Married a Witch (1942) 

95% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

After several hilarious through-the-years examples (the Civil War-era Fredric March runs off to battle rather than endure his wife's nagging), we are brought up to 1942.



In Which We Serve (1942) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

The real star of In Which We Serve is the British destroyer Torrin.



Kings Row (1942) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

In this dark drama, set shortly before WWII, two young men grow up to discover that their idyllic and wholesome Midwestern hometown has a seamy side rife with jealousy, pettiness, and horrific acts.



The Major and the Minor (1942) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

This comedy is about the budding romance between an engaged soldier and a woman posing as a 12-year-old girl.



The Palm Beach Story (1942) 

96% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

After a deliberately confusing pre-credit sequence (not explained until the film's punch line), Tom Jeffers (Joel McCrea) and Gerry Jeffers (Claudette Colbert) are married.



The Pride of the Yankees (1942) 

92% of critics love it, but only 7,800 people have rated it.

The equally tragic and heroic story of Yankee's first baseman Lou Gehrig is eloquently told here with an iconic star turn by Gary Cooper.



Road to Morocco (1942) 

91% of critics love it, but only 4,900 people have rated it.

An Oscar was bestowed upon Johnny Burke and Jimmy Van Heusen's ballad "Moonlight Becomes You".



The Talk of the Town (1942) 

92% of critics love it, but only 4,500 people have rated it.

George Stevens' Talk of the Town is a quick-witted comedy driven by wonderful performances by Cary Grant, Ronald Colman and Jean Arthur.



Went the Day Well? (1942) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

But in this stirring, startlingly violent (for its time) masterwork of WW2 propaganda, that's exactly where the plucky locals of Bramley End engage the enemy.



This Gun for Hire (1942) 

92% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

As Raven ducks and dodges the police, detective Michael Crane (Robert Preston) is hot on the trail of Bewster and Gates.



Woman of the Year (1942) 

91% of critics love it, but only 7,200 people have rated it.

As the first romantic-comedy pairing of Tracey and Hepburn, the stars' chemistry is off to a working start and the film's sparkling comedy smooths out any rough patches.



Ball of Fire (1941) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,200 people have rated it.

A splendidly funny twist on the story of Snow White, Ball of Fire boasts a pair of perfect leads in Gary Cooper and Barbara Stanwyck.



The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

The film is also known as All That Money Can Buy and Daniel and the Devil.



Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

Robert Montgomery plays saxophone-playing boxer Joe Pendleton, who insists upon piloting his own plane, much to the consternation of his manager Max Corkle (James Gleason).



The Little Foxes (1941) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,100 people have rated it.

This adaptation of Lillian Hellman's play involves the corrupt machinations of a wealthy Southern family.



Never Give a Sucker an Even Break (1941) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

In this film, W. C. Fields heads to Esoteric studios to pitch a story idea to producer Franklin Pangborn.



Penny Serenade (1941) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,200 people have rated it.

It seems hopeless until kindly adoption agency head Miss Oliver (Beulah Bondi) helps smooth their path.



The Bank Dick (1940) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

In this film, the matchless W. C. Fields plays Egbert Souse, a bibulous denizen of Lompoc who supports his family by winning radio contests.



Christmas in July (1940) 

93% of critics love it, but only 1,600 people have rated it.

This modest Preston Sturges comedy stars Dick Powell as an office clerk dreaming of better things and Ellen Drew as his more pragmatic girlfriend.



The Great McGinty (1940) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

McGinty chalks up $74 worth of votes, and when local ward heeler William Demarest can't pony up, McGinty takes direct action by trying to beat up The Boss (Akim Tamiroff).



Night Train to Munich (1940) 

93% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

This movie, made just prior to WWII, gave a more temperate view of the Nazis than later movies.



The Sea Hawk (1940) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,400 people have rated it.

Another highlight was the best adventure film score ever written by Erich Wolfgang Korngold; and the script's seriousness was nailed down by various not-so-veiled references not to 16th century Spain but 20th century Nazi Germany.



They Drive by Night (1940) 

95% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

Two hard-boiled truckers are committed to a life as wildcatters.



Dark Victory (1939) 

85% of critics love it, but only 6,800 people have rated it.

A major success and perennial favorite, Dark Victory was later remade as Stolen Hours with Susan Hayward and as a TV movie starring Elizabeth Montgomery.



Destry Rides Again (1939) 

95% of critics love it, but only 6,800 people have rated it.

His detractors laugh even louder when Destry signs on as deputy to drunken sheriff Wash Dimsdale (Charles Winninger).



Dodge City (1939) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,200 people have rated it.

Starring dashing Errol Flynn and beauteous Olivia de Havilland, Dodge City begins with a nailbiting race between a stagecoach and locomotive--representing the transition from the Old West to the new one.



Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939) 

81% of critics love it, but only 7,200 people have rated it.

Told via flashbacks, the film features an aged Mr. Chipping looking back nostalgically at his long career, taking note of the people who've touched his life over the years.



Gunga Din (1939) 

92% of critics love it, but only 7,900 people have rated it.

Now it became the tale of three eternally brawling British sergeants stationed in colonial India: Cutter (Cary Grant), McChesney (Victor McLaglen) and Ballantine (Douglas Fairbanks Jr.).



The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939) 

100% of critics love it, but only 8,200 people have rated it.

In 15th century France, a gypsy girl is framed for murder by the infatuated Chief Justice, and only the deformed bellringer of Notre Dame Cathedral can save her.



Le Jour Se Leve (1939) 

91% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Told largely in flashbacks, Marcel Carne's dark melodrama stars Jean Gabin as a factory worker who kills the rival of his lover's affections, leading to a standoff with the authorities.



Midnight (1939) 

92% of critics love it, but only 2,400 people have rated it.

The farcical complications come thick and fast, culminating in a less funny but still entertaining courtroom scene, in which the never-married Ameche and Colbert must request a divorce!



Of Mice and Men (1939) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

Despite being endlessly parodied in Warner Bros. and MGM cartoons ("Which way did he, go George?



Son of Frankenstein (1939) 

91% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Boris Karloff's final appearance as the Monster is a fitting farewell before the series descended into self-parody.



Young Mr. Lincoln (1939) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

In this biography of Abraham Lincoln, the President is wonderfully portrayed by Henry Fonda.



Boys Town (1938) 

89% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

This film focuses on Father Edward J. Flanagan, whose philosophy that no boy will grow up bad if given a chance in life culminates in his formation of Boys Town in Omaha, Nebraska.



Pygmalion (1938) 

94% of critics love it, but only 5,100 people have rated it.

She tells him, "I sold flowers.



Captains Courageous (1937) 

93% of critics love it, but only 5,600 people have rated it.

Spencer Tracy earned an Academy Award for his performance in Captains Courageous and even sings a bit; the story was parodied years later (with a few rather drastic changes) in the Chris Elliott vehicle Cabin Boy.



The Edge of the World (1937) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,100 people have rated it.

Partly based on a true story (The evacuation of "Hirta" or "St. Kilda").



The Good Earth (1937) 

94% of critics love it, but only 2,500 people have rated it.

The Good Earth is Irving Thalberg's final film production.



The Life of Emile Zola (1937) 

75% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

Well-written, well-meaning and solidly acted, The Life of Emile Zola film may ultimately be more earnest than dramatically engaging.



Make Way for Tomorrow (1937) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,400 people have rated it.

When that fails, they must find some place to stay.



Pépé le Moko (1937) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

In this film, Pepe le Moko is a well-known criminal mastermind who eludes the French police by hiding in the Kasbah section of Algiers.



Stage Door (1937) 

95% of critics love it, but only 5,700 people have rated it.

Lucille Ball, Eve Arden, and Ann Miller also play actresses in this very funny movie,



A Star Is Born (1937) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,500 people have rated it.

replies Esther defiantly.



Topper (1937) 

94% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

The musical score by longtime Hal Roach composer Marvin Hatley is perfectly attuned to the zany goings-on (including snatches of background music from Roach's earlier Laurel and Hardy comedies), while Hoagy Carmichael appears briefly on screen to introduce the film's signature tune, "Old Man Moon."



Young and Innocent (1937) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,300 people have rated it.

The actual villain, whose identity is never in doubt, is George Curzon.



After the Thin Man (1936) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,400 people have rated it.

The Charleses are sucked into another murder case via Nick's lovely cousin Elissa Landi, whose husband Alan Marshall has vanished.



The Devil-Doll (1936) 

86% of critics love it, but only 2,100 people have rated it.

Oscar-winner Lionel Barrymore ("It's a Wonderful Life") stars in this classic horror thriller about a Devil's Island escapee who shrinks murderous slaves and sells them to his victims as dolls.



Dodsworth (1936) 

87% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

In this highly acclaimed adaptation of Sinclair Lewis's novel, Walter Huston plays Sam Dodsworth, a good-hearted, middle-aged man who runs an auto manufacturing firm.



Fury (1936) 

100% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

Fritz Lang's first American film is a vigorous and perceptive indictment of mob law, starring Spencer Tracy and Sylvia Sidney.



Libeled Lady (1936) 

81% of critics love it, but only 4,400 people have rated it.

In this film, William Powell and Myrna Loy star as Bill Chandler and Connie Allenbury.



The Informer (1935) 

91% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

When director John Ford remade The Informer in 1935, the role of the tragic Irish roisterer Gypo Nolan went to Cyril's brother Victor McLaglen.



Ruggles of Red Gap (1935) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

During one of the Earl's nocturnal forays, nouveau riche American cattle baron Egbert Floud (Charles Ruggles) wins Ruggles in a poker game.



Babes in Toyland (1934) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

Two bumbling apprentices to the master toymaker of Toyland try to raise money to help Little Bo-Peep and her sweetheart Tom-Tom.



The Black Cat (1934) 

87% of critics love it, but only 5,600 people have rated it.

Making the most of its Karloff-Lugosi star pairing and loads of creepy atmosphere, The Black Cat is an early classic in the Universal monster movie library.



The Gay Divorcee (1934) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

One of the finest Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers musicals ever made, this film stars Rogers as a woman seeking a divorce.



It's a Gift (1934) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

In this film, W.C. Fields is in fine fettle as small-town grocer Harold Bissonette.



Man of Aran (1934) 

95% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

Nonfiction filmmaking pioneer Robert Flaherty's first sound feature elaborates on themes presented in his two previous major works, Nanook of the North and Moana.



The Scarlet Empress (1934) 

90% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

Complex, visually stunning, and breathtakingly intense, The Scarlet Empress overpowers its flaws with a confident vigor befitting its legendary subject.



Tarzan and His Mate (1934) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

Accompanying Cavanaugh is Neil Hamilton the former fiance of Jane Porter.



Twentieth Century (1934) 

87% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Despite his successful efforts at turning her into a star, theatrical producer Oscar Jaffe is persona non grata to actress Lily Garland - a situation that he attempts to fix when a coincidence places the two aboard the same train.



The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (1933) 

88% of critics love it, but only 7,400 people have rated it.

After the mad doctor dies, the asylum's director is possessed by the soul of Mabuse.



Baby Face (1933) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,200 people have rated it.

When her father dies, this "bound-for-bigger-things" blonde heads to NYC going to work in a bank, where she uses beauty and charms to quickly move up the ladder.



Dinner at Eight (1933) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

In this comedy/drama, social butterfly Mrs. Oliver Jordan arranges a dinner party that will benefit the business of her husband.



42nd Street (1933) 

95% of critics love it, but only 8,300 people have rated it.

Julian Marsh, a successful Broadway director, produces a new show, in spite of his poor health.



Lady for a Day (1933) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

In this film, May Robson plays Apple Annie, a slatternly Broadway apple peddler.



Little Women (1933) 

91% of critics love it, but only 7,500 people have rated it.

While Jo is away, Amy falls in love and marries Jo's old flame Laurie Laurence (Douglass Montgomery).



The Private Life of Henry VIII. (1933) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

Alexander Korda's look at the reign of England's oft-married monarch stars Charles Laughton as the title character.



Queen Christina (1933) 

89% of critics love it, but only 4,700 people have rated it.

Greta Garbo stars as the title character, a 17th-century Swedish monarch whose life is chronicled from her rise to the throne, to the moment she gave it up for the love of a Spanish ambassador.



Zero for Conduct (1933) 

92% of critics love it, but only 4,100 people have rated it.

The shortest of French filmmaker Jean Vigo's two feature-length films, Zero for Conduct (Zero de Conduite) is also arguably his most influential.



The Blood of a Poet (1932) 

94% of critics love it, but only 3,900 people have rated it.

The boy's guardian angel appears and covers him.



Blonde Venus (1932) 

56% of critics love it, but only 2,600 people have rated it.

In this film, Marlene Dietrich stars as Helen Faraday, a German cabaret singer in the States whose husband, Ned, falls ill.



Boudu Saved from Drowning (1932) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,000 people have rated it.

This classic Jean Renoir comedy was remade in 1986 as Down and Out in Beverly Hills.



The Most Dangerous Game (1932) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

This top-notch first screen incarnation (shot on sets built for King Kong (1933)) of the famous short story was redone many times but rarely to such excellent effect.



The Old Dark House (1932) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

This atmospheric thriller features an unforgettable post-Frankenstein horror role for Boris Karloff, as the hulking, disfigured butler Morgan.



Shanghai Express (1932) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,800 people have rated it.

Two notorious women of the night are aboard a train that is hijacked by rebel Chinese.



Tarzan the Ape Man (1932) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,600 people have rated it.

The original and definitive Tarzan sound movie -- following several silent films on the same subject -- stuck fairly closely to the novel by Edgar Rice Burroughs.



Island of Lost Souls (1932) 

96% of critics love it, but only 4,600 people have rated it.

Led by a note-perfect performance from Charles Laughton, Island of Lost Souls remains the definitive film adaptation of its classic source material.



La Chienne (1931) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,800 people have rated it.

Maurice (Michel Simon) is a meek bank clerk trapped in a marriage with a harridan named Adele (Magdelaine Berubet).



Tabu: A Story of the South Seas (1931) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

This is a sensual tale of doomed love, filmed on location in Tahiti.



À Nous la Liberté (1931) 

100% of critics love it, but only 2,900 people have rated it.

A Nous la Liberte is an early talkie from French filmmaker Rene Clair.



Hell's Angels (1930) 

76% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Several early scenes establish Lyon and Hall as unregenerate lotharios, setting up their romantic rivalry over two-timing socialite Jean Harlow.



Under the Roofs of Paris (1930) 

90% of critics love it, but only 1,200 people have rated it.

Rene Clair's Under the Roofs of Paris is one of the first French films shot in sound.



Pandora's Box (1929) 

91% of critics love it, but only 6,700 people have rated it.

Pandora's Box is an acknowledged masterpiece of sensual imagery.



The Cocoanuts (1929) 

95% of critics love it, but only 5,900 people have rated it.

A fast-talking Miami hotel manager tries to stay in business during the Florida land rush.



The Cameraman (1928) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,600 people have rated it.

Fast-paced and funny, this silent Buster Keaton comedy has" the Great Stone Face" playing an aspiring newsreel cameraman who falls in love with an office girl and tries to impress her by getting the scoop on a Chinese tong war.



The Crowd (1928) 

95% of critics love it, but only 4,300 people have rated it.

John and Mary are eventually married, raising two children in their tiny New York tenement (complete with a balky toilet-the first time that this particular bathroom fixture ever appeared in an American film).



The Docks of New York (1928) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,900 people have rated it.

He saves Betty Compson from committing suicide; though the girl displays little gratitude, the inebriated Bancroft impulsively marries her.



The Last Command (1928) 

100% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Plot inconsistencies aside, The Last Command is a stunning cinematic achievement, combining the harsh realities of Russia and Hollywood with vonSternberg's unerring sense of visual beauty.



The Man Who Laughs (1928) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,300 people have rated it.

Though the property was later optioned by Kirk Douglas, The Man Who Laughs was never remade.



The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog (1927) 

95% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

British matinee idol Ivor Novello plays Jonathan Drew, a quiet, secretive young man who rents a room in a London boarding house.



The Cat and the Canary (1927) 

92% of critics love it, but only 1,700 people have rated it.

Remade three times in the sound era, this silent version starring Laura LaPlante is considered the definitive rendering.



College (1927) 

88% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

One of Buster's lesser -- but still classic -- silent features.



Underworld (1927) 

84% of critics love it, but only 2,200 people have rated it.

A series of "art" titles fill the screen to establish the mood: "A great city in the dead of night



Wings (1927) 

94% of critics love it, but only 6,500 people have rated it.

Subsequent war epics may have borrowed heavily from the original Best Picture winner, but they've all lacked Clara Bow's luminous screen presence and William Wellman's deft direction.



The Adventures of Prince Achmed (1926) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,000 people have rated it.

German director Lotte Reiniger spent three years making this silent animated film based on the Arabian Nights legends.



The Big Parade (1925) 

100% of critics love it, but only 3,100 people have rated it.

Rich, clean-cut American hero John Gilbert plunges into World War I and some of the most emotionally shattering battle scenes ever filmed.



Seven Chances (1925) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

The hilariously inventive comedy culminates with one of Buster Keaton's most renowned set pieces that finds him pursued through the streets of Los Angeles by a gaggle of wannabe-wives - as well as scores of massive, dislodged boulders.



The Navigator (1924) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,500 people have rated it.

A funny, touching story, this is the tale of a wealthy couple who find themselves cast adrift in an empty cruise liner.



The Thief of Bagdad (1924) 

96% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

It requires some viewing commitment, but this beautifully assembled showcase for Douglas Fairbanks' acting offers some splendid treats for classic film fans.



Greed (1924) 

100% of critics love it, but only 5,200 people have rated it.

There he meets and befriends Marcus Schouler (Jean Hersholt).



The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923) 

95% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

A heart-rending take on the classic book, with a legendary performance by Lon Chaney.



Our Hospitality (1923) 

95% of critics love it, but only 6,000 people have rated it.

En route, Keaton befriends pretty Natalie Talmadge, who invites him to dinner.



Nanook of the North (1922) 

100% of critics love it, but only 7,000 people have rated it.

Flaherty employed two recently developed Akeley gyroscope cameras which required minimum lubrication; this allowed him to tilt and pan for certain shots even in cold weather.



The Phantom Carriage (1921) 

100% of critics love it, but only 4,800 people have rated it.

Edith Larssen (Astrid Holm) aids in bringing the troubled couple together.



Orphans of the Storm (1921) 

90% of critics love it, but only 2,300 people have rated it.

In this film, Henriette brings her blind sister Louise to Paris, in search of a surgeon who might be able to restore her sister's sight.



Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920) 

92% of critics love it, but only 3,500 people have rated it.

In 1920, filmgoers were treated to no fewer than two different film versions of Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.



Way Down East (1920) 

94% of critics love it, but only 2,700 people have rated it.

New York's Museum of Modern Art obtained a set of prints of Griffith's classic 1920 movie Way Down East and restored them, helped along by the rediscovery of the film's original musical score by Louis Silvers and William F. Peters.



Broken Blossoms (1919) 

95% of critics love it, but only 6,000 people have rated it.

Thought-provoking and beautifully filmed, D.W. Griffith's Broken Blossoms presents a master at the top of his form.